Canadian-Based QEII Foundation Raises 1.8 Million for New Simulation Program

High-stakes education: Simulation training at QEII

Wouldn’t 1.8M be great for your simluation program? Learn how the Charles V. Keating Emergency and Trauma Centre at the QEII Health Sciences Centre was able to secure this funding to help improve the training of their healthcare professionals with this recent article from The Chronicle Herald Times:

Designed to provide a realistic medical teaching environment, the Sim Bay is heading toward a transformation that will turn the makeshift space into a state-of-the-art high fidelity simulation facility — as close to real life as possible. Once complete, it will play a key role in training various disciplines resulting in improved patient health outcomes.

The QEII Foundation raised $1.8-million to support this transformation as part of a simulation-based learning campaign.

“When the space is renovated, the sky is the limit for us. We’ve done great things with what we have and I know we can be so much better,” says Donna Warren, Simulation Coordinator, QEII Simulation Program. “If you’ve ever had a loved one who’s been in hospital, and whose care has been exemplary, behind that is hours and hours of simulation and getting it right.”


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Dr. Nick Sowers, medical director of the Sim Bay, works closely with various groups of learners at the QEII to direct simulations and offer medical oversight. He says the traditional medical philosophy of ‘see one, do one, teach one’ is quickly going by the wayside as simulation training proves its worth. Just one scenario provides crucial real-life training, and simulation training reduces the need for, and the risk of, experiential learning.

“By the time you’re a senior resident, the diagnosis and treatment is often not the hard part,” Dr. Sowers says. “One of the hardest parts is the ability to manage the room, to control yourself and stay calm; communicating effectively as a team during a crisis no matter how chaotic it is.” Taking charge and leading a team of staff in an emergency can take years for most physicians to perfect, but now, thanks to spaces like the current Sim Bay, self-admitted quiet people like fourth-year resident Dr. Samantha Jang-Stewart can find their voice before graduation.

“My first year doing simulation was terrifying because you’re a little unsure and still learning the medical side of things and then you’re supposed to be directing a team of people,” Dr. Jang-Stewart says. “It’s really nerve-wracking but with practice in sim, you get used to doing it and become more comfortable and confident.”This new-found confidence helped Dr. Jang-Stewart lead a team of residents to a first place finish at the Trauma Nova Scotia Simulation Olympics.


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Summary of Product Demo Video Interviews from IMSH 2017 Trade Show Floor

imsh 2017

Hey Simulation Champions! Today we are sharing a comprehensive review of all the product demonstration interviews HealthySimulation produced exclusively from the International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare 2017 Orlando Tradeshow floor! These videos will help you to catch up with the latest news and information about innovative new products and services entering the field of healthcare simulation, so be sure to watch them all!


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Exclusive IMSH 2017 Exhibit Hall Video Interviews:

Finally, here is the HealthySim staff writeup about our favorite products from IMSH 2017!

Singapore Simulation Symposium “S3” Has Extended Abstract Deadline to June 30th!

singapore healthcare simulation conference

This October 31st – November 3rd, SESAM, SimGHOSTS and SingHealth are combining powers to create the S3 Simulation Conference event in Singapore, the World’s first multi-organizational simulation event! And great news — the abstract submission deadline has been extended until the end of this month — so there is still a bit more time left to submit and join us this November!

About the S3 Event

Bringing the World of Medical Simulation Together​ The S3 Conference brings together thought​ leaders and cutting-edge ideas from three renowned simulation centers to one place – Academia, located in Singapore General Hospital Campus, Singapore.

Hosted by the SingHealth Duke-NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS), the S3 Conference 2017 is jointly organized by SIMS, Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine (SESAM) and The Gathering Of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists (SimGHOSTS).


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This international tripartite part​nership will provide participating healthcare simulation teams with the best learning and networking opportunities with leading experts worldwide. The S3 Conference aims to be at the pulse of Asia’s simulation industry and to lead the transformation of simulation in the region and beyond.

The theme for the S3 Conference​ this year is, “At the Crossroad of Simulation; Bringing the World together”. ​​​​

Expect transformative sessions with international guest speakers, experience the latest in simulation technology, take in new ideas, share simulation best practices across borders, present ground-breaking simulation studies to fellow industry insiders, receive hands-on training in advanced simulation procedures, and more.​

Learn more and submit your abstract today on the S3 website!


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Medical Training Magazine Interviews President of Simulab Doug Beighle Regarding Simulation & Patient Safety Industries

doug beighle healthcare training magazine

Recently our friends at Medical Training Magazine (formerly MedSim Magazine) interview Doug Beighle, President and COO of Simulab, regarding the current state of the simulation and patient safety industries. As a board member of key organizations between these industries like the Global Network for Simulation in Healthcare (GNSH), SSH, and NPSF — Doug sits in a unique position to share where the worlds of patient safety and simulation can collaborate to improve healthcare outcomes on an international level. Here below, are a few excerpts from the edition which you can read fully through the link below!

Medical Training Magazine: You are on a number of Boards and important committees at the SSIH, National Patient Safety Foundation and GNSH to name a few and you work very hard to get members of the different associations to work together to achieve common goals. Please discuss the importance of working together and what you would like to see accomplished.

Doug Beighle: At Simulab we have a very experienced management team, which gives me an opportunity to spend almost a third of my time focused on issues external to our company. Nearly five years ago we realized the Patient Safety and Medical Simulation movements were suffering from the same symptom – lack of resources. By this I mean a lack of adequate budget: allocated trainer time, learner time, and training facilities and equipment. The majority of my external work is an effort to support these movements by increasing awareness, working to break down silos, and building partnerships. Medical errors in the United States are a multi-billion dollar annual problem. Yet, two of the most powerful opportunities to reduce these errors, patient safety programs and simulation-based education are under-resourced. Bringing in a business perspective helps healthcare educators and patient safety professionals build a case to get their projects adequately funded. Ultimately, the first step towards reducing medical errors requires that educators, healthcare providers, patient safety experts, and financial officers break down their silos and work together using the same language.

MTM: How could the simulation industry help itself and the healthcare sector to improve training, patient care and results?


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DB: There are many initiatives that can help speed up the process of improving patient care. One of the highest impact possibilities is integrating the simulator and curricula into one training system. In these settings learners would use a simulator and modules to self-direct learning. These systems create the ability to easily measure a learner’s path to mastery. This process would not only reduce the cost of educational interventions, but it might increase the likelihood of retention. Additionally, without the need for an instructor to be present, scheduling periodic assessments of adherence would be easier. There are examples of this today from the Resuscitation Quality Improvement (RQI) product from Laerdal, products from SonoSim and many other virtual reality training systems.

MTM: What effect do you think the merger between the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and the National Patient Safety Foundation will have on patient safety and outcomes?

DB: As a member of one of the NPSF committees I do not know the behind the scenes but everyone believes it will be a very beneficial merger. The new group will continue under the IHI name and one of its goals is to revitalize the issue of patient safety. Derek Feeley, CEO and president of IHI, will lead the combined organization and Dr. Tejal Gandhi, president and CEO of NPSF, will lead the new organization’s patient safety teams. One goal of the new group is to draw greater attention to patient safety across the care continuum and not just in hospitals. It would be beneficial if they work with industry, academia and hospitals to bring innovation to medical education and work together by having state chapters or regional chapters.

Read the full interview with Doug in the latest edition of Medical Training Magazine

Healthcare Simulation Dictionary – Free SSH Resource to Answer ‘What’s It All Mean’?

medical simulation dictionary

Today we have crossed the 1st birthday of the Healthcare Simulation Dictionary — a free resource from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH).


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The Healthcare Simulation Dictionary features a collection of definitions showing how various terms—and their meanings— are being used in the profession today. Inside you’ll find straightforward definitions of 127 words and terms. Download your free copy today! The Healthcare Simulation Dictionary is designed to enhance communication and clarity for healthcare simulationists in teaching, education, assessment, research, and systems integration activities. Thank you to the contributors and healthcare simulation societies, who over three years dedicated time and expertise to developing and producing the dictionary.

Download the Healthcare Simulation Dictionary for Free!


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Final Countdown for Early-Bird Rate Begins for SimGHOSTS 2017 USA – Aug. 1-4 at WakeMed Raleigh

sim tech training in healthcare

Sim Champs — its the “Final Countdown” for big savings to SimGHOSTS 2017 USA at WakeMed Center for Innovative Learning in Raleigh North Carolina this August 1st-4th with early-bird registration!

Join hundreds of Simulation Champions from around the world at our 7th annual hands-on training event!  SimGHOSTS is working with Simulation Champion Dr. Amar Patel to bring the 2017 USA event to the WakeMed Center for Innovative Learning in Raleigh, North Carolina! We cannot wait to showcase this amazing facility, team, and program to the world’s leading simulation technology specialists.  Save the date so you can join us there in August!

Pre-Con Workshops: August 1st, 2017
Main Symposium: August 2nd-4th, 2017
Host: WakeMed Center for Innovative Learning
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina

Brochure here

REGISTER HERE

Early-Bird ENDS JULY 1st! $473
Standard (July 2nd – August 2nd): $597

Who Should Attend SimGHOSTS Events?

Anyone responsible for the technical operation of a medical simulation lab including full-time or part-time Sim Techs, or clinical educators tasked with operating the day-to-day of simulation spaces. As well, anyone evaluating medical-simulation based technology should strongly consider attending as most major industry vendors are encouraged to attend.

Other meetings are better suited for clinical educators specifically looking to learn how to teach with medical simulation.


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*New Thought* Administrators of simulation programs should also consider sending their institution’s AV and IT related staff members who are responsible for supporting the simulation program. In our most recent events, staff from AV and IT departments outside of the healthcare simulation program found immense benefit from participating in SimGHOSTS to better understand the needs of their institution’s simulation program!

SimGHOSTS events provide hands-on training workshops, special pre-symposium courses and podium presentations in:

  • Manikin Programming & Hardware Repair
  • A/V System Design, Integration and Consolidation
  • IT Networking & Debugging
  • Trauma & Suturing Moulage Makeup
  • Video Production & Editing Techniques
  • Team Communication & Leadership
  • Medical Pharmacology for Scenarios
  • Career Development & Staff Management
  • Much much more!

simalliance

Platinum Sponsor – simAlliance

Once again, Level 3 Healthcare through simAlliance is sponsoring this year’s Keynote Address and Opening Reception!

The Keynote address will be given by Brian Gillett, MD CEO & Founder of SimCore.  Dr. Gillett’s presentation will explore new simulation technologies, how effective and sustainable healthcare interventions must be developed in a genuine partnership with those who will ultimately utilize the systems, and lessons for the successful development, growth, and support of staff who operate simulation programs from his numerous administrative roles.

The Opening Reception Comedy Show & Networking Event will be held at Raleigh’s premiere comedy club “Goodnight’s”! This world famous venue for stand-up comedians has been putting on a show since 1983, with dinner & drink specials from its bar & grill. Bus transportation, taco bar dinner and drinks are on us thanks to simAlliance!

Laerdal, CAE Healthcare, EMS SimulationIQ will also be returning as Gold Sponsors to the event, providing hands-on technical workshops throughout the event!

Unable to join us in US this August? Join SimGHOSTS this month at SESAM with a special track or Singapore this November!

Learn more and Register for SimGHOSTS 2017 USA here!

WISER Develops Ebola Clinical Response Team Training & Receiving Centers Through Simulation

wiser ebola simulation

Our friends at the WISER Simulation Center at UPMC has been actively developing and supporting a variety of educational programs focusing on Clinical Response Team (CRT) Training for response to highly communicable diseases.

From the initial onboarding of the CRT, to skills training, competency assessments and maintenance of knowledge, WISER has been collaborating with Emergency Preparedness to provide high quality training and assessment of the team. Due to their integral role, WISER helped to coordinate and participate in a PA Department of Health (DOH) evaluation exercise as part of the process to become an Ebola Assessment/Treatment Facility for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.


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As a result of over 100 people working together, UPMC has been officially approved and is now recognized as an Ebola Receiving Facility. UPMC has the privilege of being part of the Ebola treatment network which includes both Front Line Facilities and seven Regional Treatment centers. WISER Director Dr. Paul Phrampus commented they are “proud to be part of such an amazing team!”.

Learn more about the WISER Simulation Center and Training Programs


Supported Organization:


Featured Job Listing: Medical Education Western Region Sales Representative

Check out this medical simulation job listing from Engenium:

Western Region Sales representative reports to the Director of Sales and is responsible for managing sales activities throughout every stage of the sales cycle, from lead generation through to close. Covering the Western region, you will be responsible for selling software and hardware solutions used to improve training and patient outcomes in Hospital, Nursing Schools and colleges.


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Responsibilities include:

  • Responsible for the sales of Software and hardware solutions for simulation and clinical environments within the Western region (including Northwest territories, Canada and Alaska.)
  • Responsible for building strong relationships within hospitals, Nursing School/colleges and health system networks.
  • Consult and make recommendations to prospects and clients with respect to solutions the company offers.
  • Clearly articulate technology and product positioning to clinical and medical education.
  • Deliver web-based and onsite presentations to audiences of varying sizes and professions
  • Demonstrate the ability to build relationships with Medical Education and Patient Safety Key stakeholders.
  • Maximize all opportunities in the process of closing a sale, resulting in the taking of market share from competitors.
  • Exhibit at industry conferences and special events.
  • Maintain accurate records of all sales and prospecting activities including sales calls, presentations, closed sales, and follow-up activities through weekly reports and the use of a CRM tool.

Requirements:

  • A minimum of 2-4 years professional experience
  • Proven ability to achieve sales quotas
  • Experience with web-based productivity tools
  • Willingness to travel a minimum of 30% and work in a fast-paced environment.
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills
  • Ability to work independently and in a team environment
  • B.A./B.S. in Business, Computer Science, Healthcare Management, or related degree strongly preferred
  • Experience using Salesforce is a plus
  • Software & Simulation experience is highly desired
  • Existing contacts within the Medical Education and Patient Safety industries is strongly preferred

Interested applicants should directly contact Jason Irving at Engenium

‘S3’ Singapore Simulation Conference Now Accepting Presentations for November Event, Supported by SimHealth, SESAM & SimGHOSTS

singapore simulation conference 2017

The S3 Conference brings together thought leaders and cutting-edge ideas from three renowned simulation centers to one place: located in Singapore General Hospital Campus, Singapore. Hosted by the SingHealth Duke-NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS), the S3 Conference 2017 is jointly organized by SIMS, Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine (SESAM) and The Gathering Of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists (SimGHOSTS).

All presentation submissions are due by May 19th!

This international tripartite partnership will provide participating healthcare simulation teams with the best learning and networking opportunities with leading experts worldwide. The S3 Conference aims to be at the pulse of Asia’s simulation industry and to lead the transformation of simulation in the region and beyond. The theme for the S3 Conference this year is, “At the Crossroad of Simulation; Bringing the World together”. Expect transformative sessions with international guest speakers, experience the latest in simulation technology, take in new ideas, share simulation best practices across borders, present ground-breaking simulation studies to fellow industry insiders, receive hands-on training in advanced simulation procedures, and more.

Who Should Attend?


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The S3 Conference connects healthcare professionals across disciplines and medical professions in Singapore, the Asia-Pacific region, Europe and the US. The conference will be useful for:

  • Healthcare and simulation technology specialists,
  • Healthcare educators and trainers,
  • Nursing and allied health professionals,
  • Academics and researchers, as well as Local and overseas healthcare leaders.

The main conference takes place from 1 – 3 November 2017, while pre-conference activities will be held on 31 October 2017.

About the Host

The SingHealth Duke-NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS) is Singapore’s largest simulation facility with a comprehensive range of simulation modalities, cutting-edge technology and training programmes. SIMS is committed to delivering quality simulation training by providing a safe and supervised environment for healthcare professionals to sharpen their clinical skills. The institute draws upon the synergy of collective expertise, curriculum and resources in SingHealth. With a rich legacy in clinical education, SIMS aims to be the leading global institution in medical simulation, pushing frontiers in patient safety.

Submit Your Abstracts By May 19th on the SingHealth S3 Website!

Millionaire’s Mission: Joe Kiani Wants Zero Patient Deaths Due to Medical Error

Joe Kiani, founder and CEO of Masimo, is photographed at the company's headquarters in Irvine, California January 27, 2017. Kiani invented non-invasive patient monitoring medical devices. Photo by Kendrick Brinson
Photo by Kendrick Brinson

STAT news reporter USHA LEE MCFARLING recently reported on the work of patient safety advocate Joe Kiani, a millionaire on a mission to solve patient deaths attributed to medical error. I have previously participated in Joe’s annual Patient Safety Summit as a representative of SimGHOSTS, and found the man, the mission, and the organization a powerful voice for improving healthcare. Check out this excerpt of the article by Usha on STAT news:

Joe Kiani likes to point out that the most worn spot on most medical monitoring devices is the mute button. He’s out to change that — and, he hopes, to stop the epidemic of preventable hospital death that kills tens of thousands of Americans each year. It’s not a glamorous cause. And Kiani is not a household name. But he is a multimillionaire with a proven track record of using engineering smarts to fix dogged problems; he made his fortune improving the humble pulse oximeter, which measures oxygen saturation in the blood. Now, he’s pushing a nerdy, but elegant, idea for saving lives: prodding manufacturers of medical devices and electronic records to open their platforms so all the systems can talk to each other.

His tech fix — if widely implemented — could bring order to the cacophony of beeps, buzzes, and blaring alarms that can so overwhelm nurses and doctors that they push “mute” and miss true emergencies. It could make it easier for staff to monitor patients with complex needs. And it could flag, in advance, potentially fatal errors like incorrect dosing and drug allergies. Manufacturers, naturally, aren’t so eager to share their computer code. But Kiani is not one to give up. He stages a glitzy patient safety summit each year, attracting big-name speakers like Bill Clinton and Joe Biden to pound home the need for hospitals to stop killing their patients.

Kiani runs his own medical device company, Masimo, from a building so airy and modern it stood in for Stark Enterprises in the first “Iron Man” movie. “It’s probably better he didn’t become a doctor,” mused Dr. Steven Barker, a professor emeritus of anesthesiology and aeronautical engineer at the University of Arizona who now works as chief science officer for Masimo. “He wouldn’t have saved nearly as many lives.” Soon after graduating, Kiani got a chance to work on pulse oximeters. The geek in him was captivated. “I couldn’t believe you could shine light in your finger and measure oxygen in your blood,” he said. “I just loved the idea.”


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When Kiani began to put faces to the statistics, he was shaken. One of those faces belonged to 11-year-old Leah Coufal, who died in December of 2002 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. She’d had routine surgery to correct a mild chest deformity and apparently received a massive dose of fentanyl to control pain — enough to stop her breathing. Her mother, Lenore Alexander, couldn’t talk about Leah’s death for a decade. When she started speaking out, Kiani listened. He was shocked to realize his own daughter — who is fine now — had surgery in the same hospital, with the same surgeon, in the same week as Leah. “That could have been me,” Kiani told the people gathered at his first patient summit in 2013. “It could have been you.”

He was also shocked to find Leah had not been monitored after surgery, not even with a simple pulse oximeter. Another name Kiani couldn’t keep out of his mind at the time was Rory Staunton, a 12-year old from New York who scraped his arm in gym class, then died from a sepsis infection that simple screening tools could have detected.  

How one hospital is beating sepsis and saving lives “He wondered: “Why are people going into hospitals and not coming out?’” said Frederic J. Harris, an electrical engineering professor at San Diego State University who taught Kiani and remains close to him.

He’s working to create the architecture that hospitals could use to network their tens of thousands of devices into what he calls a “truly neutral, two-way plug and play” system. Once those standards are in place, he said, “I’m going to call vendors on their data pledges — very publicly.”

Read the full article on STAT news today