Airport Hosts Simulated Crash Exercise for Emergency Preparedness Training

Airport hosts simulated crash exercise for emergency preparedness training

Gosanangelo.com recently reported how loud sirens and flashing lights filled the air in-between the runways at San Angelo Regional Airport recently, as part of an emergency preparedness exercise, which involved a simulated crash between commercial and military aircraft which included irst-responders from the San Angelo Fire Department. The EMS group arrived at the scene to administer ‘aid’ to the ‘victims,’ portrayed by local volunteers, and Goodfellow Air Force Base personnel.

The purpose of the exercise was to help prepare emergency personnel for real-world emergencies, which is a REGULATED practice in the aviation industry!

“It keeps us updated on our training (so that) we’re prepared and ready to handle any situation that takes place,” Firefighter Roger Hernandez said. “We like to keep (first-responders) on their toes,” Santos Elizondo, EMS coordinator for SAFD, added. Firefighter Shane Mathews leads volunteer ‘victims’ to awaiting buses that will take them to local hospitals, where training will continue Thursday, July 13, 2017, at San Angelo Regional Airport. (Photo: Cara DeLoach) The mock scenario went like this: a military aircraft had been in the process of landing at the airport, when it collided with a passenger aircraft stopped on the run-way.


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Following the script, the pilot and co-pilot of the military aircraft have ejected; one has serious injuries, and the other deceased, and 24 civilian passengers were scattered across the field with varying ‘injuries.’

Rescue crews followed protocol responding to the situation, first putting out the aircraft ‘fires’ and proceeding to help the injured, who used prosthetic makeup to simulate fake wounds. Responders applied first-aid to victims, and classified their injuries according to severity — all while being observed by leaders from the Office of Emergency Management and the San Angelo Fire Department. 

Simulations like these are “important because you can control an exercise. You can control how many dead, injured and missing you have … In real world situations you don’t really have too much of a control. You just try to make sure the damage doesn’t spread out,” said Zak Dale, who created the fake injuries, and works in Medical Logistics at Goodfellow Air Force Base.”


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SynDaver Expands Executive Leadership Team and Prepares for IPO

syndaver

Recently in Tampa, SynDaver Labs, who focus on high-fidelity synthetic human and animal simulators for medical and veterinary training, announced the expansion of their executive leadership team Monday with the hiring of Kevin King as their new vice president of global marketing. Not many companies in our industry are in the public sector so this is exciting news!

“This is a great day for SynDaver, and I am very excited to have Kevin join my leadership team,” said Dr. Christopher Sakezles, founder of SynDaver Labs. “As we continue to experience record growth, the wisdom and expertise Kevin brings will be instrumental to our expansion as we continue progress towards our planned IPO.” King, a native of Toronto, Canada, and an 18-year seasoned healthcare executive in the medical simulation marketplace, moved to the Tampa Bay area in 2015, where he served as a senior executive for CAE Healthcare, before joining SynDaver’s executive leadership team.

“SynDaver’s products are profoundly transformational in terms of medical education, and there’s nothing like them anywhere in the world, which is why I found SynDaver attractive,” King said. “Prior to my executive leadership roles, I have more than 15 years serving patients as a critical care paramedic in the air environment and on the ground, so patients and their outcomes are still fundamentally important to me. With SynDaver, I feel the company’s vision closely aligns with mine by providing the highest-fidelity simulated trainers to both human doctors and veterinarians so we can improve training and help save lives.”  Prior to his time at CAE, King worked for Muskoka EMS as chief of ambulance services and was adjunct faculty at METI in Sarasota as a critical care clinical educator.

SynDaver recently experienced a record-breaking second quarter and is expected to double their sales from last year. Additionally, this past January, SynDaver began executing plans to enable them to have an initial public offering, which is scheduled for 2020.


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About SynDaver Labs

Headquartered in Tampa, Florida, SynDaver Labs is the world’s leading manufacturer of ultra-realistic, synthetic human and animal surgical trainers. SynDaver’s synthetic bodies simulate fully-functioning live organisms and are primarily used for training in schools, hospitals and military installations. SynDaver has the world’s largest database of live-tissue properties and all SynDaver tissues are made from water, salts and fibers. The company currently has 12 patents on these materials, processes and related products. Currently, SynDaver Labs employs more than 100 people at their Tampa facility and is planning additional facilities in the U.S., China, Europe and Latin America.

SynDaver Labs products have been lauded by industry experts and earned a cult following after appearances on ABC’s Shark Tank, MythBusters, Grey’s Anatomy, and the series finale of CSI. The company’s models are also expected to feature prominently in multiple episodes of the upcoming MythBusters 2.0.

 Learn more about the awesome synthetic cadavers at SynDaver’s website!

Medical Group Readies Complaint Over Use of Live Pigs for Training Instead of Simulators

live animal training instead of simulators for healthcare

Last week the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine announced they will file a federal complaint against the University of Missouri School of Medicine, questioning the legality of the school’s use of live animals for emergency medicine residency training — as reported by the Columbia Tribune.

Consider that if enough healthcare groups complained about the abuse of animals for medical training, that simulators would grow in adoption and utilization, as this article clearly points out! Does your healthcare program have an animal rights group? Perhaps as a simulation center representative you should connect with them to explore collaborative options of mutually beneficial support!

In the complaint, which the committee emailed to the Tribune on Friday, the national not-for-profit organization of 12,000 physicians asserts that the training program does not meet the requirements of the Animal Welfare Act of 1966. Emergency residents practice several medical procedures on live pigs, and “this animal use is at odds with the current standards of practice in emergency medicine training,” the committee said in the complaint.

The committee conducted a survey of 168 emergency medicine programs nationwide and found that 150 of them, or 89 percent, did not use animals to train residents. Four of those 150 programs are in Missouri, including the University of Missouri-Kansas City, which is part of the UM System along with the Columbia campus. In the complaint, the committee said these 150 programs use only human-based simulation to practice the procedures that MU’s residents practice on pigs. 

Because the MU School of Medicine uses live animals despite the existence of alternative methods and has not provided “objective evidence to support” doing so, the school is breaking the law, the organization said in the complaint. However, Foundation for Biomedical Research President Matthew Bailey said in an email that nationwide, doctors do not have a general consensus that simulation can replace the use of animals in physician training.


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“While simulators have become increasingly advanced in recent years, and make good adjuncts to training, many doctors do not agree that they provide an adequate level of training before operating on live people,” Bailey said. “They simply aren’t a full replacement in every case, yet.”

Human-based simulators “are not yet capable of replicating the human condition” in the case of some injuries, Bailey said. He gave the example of traumatic injuries that members of the military might suffer in combat. The Association of American Medical Colleges on its website says that the role of live animals in research is “irreplaceable” and that animals are “vital in the medical education continuum.”

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine attributes its information about MU’s emergency medicine training program from a protocol document the committee obtained. According to the document, trainees cut into and open the throats and chests of the live pigs in order to insert needles and tubes and repair an injury to the pericardium, a sac surrounding the heart. The trainees continue the procedures even if the pig dies in the process, but if it survives, they kill it before they perform the final procedure.

The committee will send the complaint to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Animal Care Unit, which is the division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture responsible for enforcing the Animal Welfare Act. The complaint asks APHIS to investigate MU’s medical school and enforce penalties for what the committee sees as breaches of federal law.


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EMSWorld Interviews Moulage Concepts Founder Bobbie Merica About Simulation Realism Through Makeup

EMSWorld recently interviewed Moulage expert Bobbie Merica of MoulageConcepts.com to learn how moulage makeup can improve the educational outcomes of simulation by increasing the realism for learners. Here are a couple of excerpts from the EMSWorld article entitled The Importance of Accuracy in Moulage Trainingby Valeria Amato:

What advice would you give people who are looking to implement more realistic and effective moulage into training regimens?

It’s like anything else: You need to plan and prepare. When you develop your case scenarios, decide what the takeaway is going to be. Is it triage-specific? If so, then your wounds should accurately represent wounds related to triage. A lot of the time, people will throw in the moulage piece at the end without giving it any thought. They won’t collectively decide what the full-thickness burn is going to look like, what the pediatric patient will look like and how they’re going to present it. Locate an accurate picture on the Internet of an actual case. Practice creating moulage so that everyone in your training knows what these wounds will look like.

Mostly it’s about the planning. You’d never run your training scenarios without a great deal of planning. When you’re building those scenarios, start building in those moulage components. Understand what story you want to tell. Understand what the training outcome is. Is intubation with a full-thickness burn the outcome, or is it identifying the smoke inhalation? If the training outcome is smoke inhalation, then you don’t need a full-thickness burn. It’s not difficult to clarify that a full-thickness burn in the upper airway in the chest and neck has smoke inhalation. If you really want to know if someone has smoke inhalation, bring it back and test it in multiple areas. Create that eye-reddening, some tears coming down, the reddening in the back of the throat. That little bit of hoarseness. Break it out into multiple training avenues, unless intubating the patient with a full-thickness burn is the skill set.


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That makes sense, especially going back to what you said about using moulage in less of a theatrical capacity and for mass-casualty incidents.

If it’s a mass-casualty incident, you’re going to have some people who look like those first-line-of-response people, but often a lot of those people look the same. Certainly you should assess the woman screaming and covered in blood, but you might also want to look at that person quietly dying right next to her. It’s about creating all those aspects and using this as a tool to define where those strengths are and, more important, where those weaknesses are so you know how to align future training dollars.

I think every person, every entity and every training site should have access to this level of training. Moulage doesn’t have to be expensive and time-consuming. You can have amazing moulage that tells the whole story, allowing you to spend the next six weeks accurately training your participants to meet outcomes, that will cost you pennies.

Do you have a copy of Bobbie’s Best Selling Moulage Recipe Book? Check out our review here!

A Sim Tech Shares Why You Should Come to SimGHOSTS 2017 USA

simghosts sim training

Simulation Operator Rachel Bailey  recently shared with the simulation community why she suggests attending SimGHOSTS.


There is still time to register for the 2017 USA Event
Next month at WakeMed in Raleigh, NC August 1st-4th

From Rachel: SimGHOSTS is a community of hard working technicians that adapt to any environment given to them.    As technicians we work over 8 hours a day, and when we are not working, we are thinking about what we can do better in the simulation community.  We volunteer for projects, we come in early and stay late.  You have to love the job in order to stay in the field.  The hours we work and the constant struggle to ensure things operate well, can weigh heavily.  Sometimes we are in a no- win situation but it never prevents us from thinking of how to improve simulations for educators and learners.


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Being a sim tech is not the easiest job, nor the most rewarding, we do the job because we love it.  The demand of the job can leave us discouraged and burnt out, but when August comes around, we get to meet with people that are just like us and experience the same highs and lows of simulation operations.  I have attended several SimGHOSTS conferences, I get the pleasure of meeting new technicians, hearing their ideas, and seeing there fabrications.  The passion of this community is something to experience.  It is not about where you went to college, it is not about who you know, this conference is strictly about the job that we all love.

A fellow sim tech stated her experience at SimGHOSTS, as her “date night” with her job.  I couldn’t agree with her more.  This conference is more than educational, it is empowering.  When I thought I could not take one more reminder of what didn’t work , or how much time I spend at my job, that a select few really understand, I go to SimGHOSTS as a reminder that I really love what I do, and I love the community I am involved in.  I have attended SimGHOSTS as a presenter and a participant, and the community is the most inquisitive, intelligent, and involved in simulation technology that I have ever experienced.  People are proud and willing to share ideas and projects.  Every time I attend I am empowered to do my job for another year.

Whether you are tech, educator, coordinator, or director, the education you receive at SimGHOSTS is as unique as the people sharing what they have learned.  If you haven’t been to a conference, I urge you to try to persuade your leadership to invest in your education and your professional development.  See you in Carolina!

Learn more about joining Rachel at SimGHOSTS 2017 USA this Aug. 1-4!


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Modern Healthcare Covers Growth of Healthcare Simulation Field

modern healthcare simulation

In the most recent addition of Modern Healthcare, the publisher covered the growing field of healthcare simulation with key interviews to help outsiders better understand the benefits of the emerging methodologies and technologies. This is a GREAT article to introduce others to the field of healthcare simulation, so be sure to share this link!

Simulation can save lives and limit patient harm by ensuring physicians young and old alike follow protocols and complete all the necessary steps in order to safely perform a procedure. In a study of 44 final-year medical students in Frankfurt, Germany, students who participated in a three-day simulation-based training course were found to have more thoroughly followed protocols for CPR and a trauma enactment in comparison to students who shadowed emergency physicians for three days. Students trained on simulators scored an average of 90% on their ability to complete steps required on a standard CPR checklist, while the other students scored 62%.

It’s not just students. Another study found that anesthesiologists who engaged in simulation-based training on how to properly wean patients from cardiopulmonary bypass performed better in real-life procedures than those who received traditional interactive seminars. Simulation-trained physicians scored over five percentage points higher when assessed two weeks later by senior staff on their ability to adequately complete necessary steps on a technical checklist. Similar results were shown five weeks after training. Researchers seeking to understand whether simulation could help improve training for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter cannulation found that 51% of simulation-trained residents were successful on the first try of cannulating a patient, as compared with the traditionally trained group’s success rate of 37%, according to a study published in the journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges.


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Medical malpractice payouts have begun climbing upward since 2012, reaching $3.9 billion in 2016. Connecticut’s payout rate per capita is among the highest in the nation. In hopes of reversing this trend and reducing risk, Connecticut-based Hartford HealthCare sought to improve simulation-based training for obstetricians, who are at a particularly high risk for malpractice suits. The health system’s Center for Education, Simulation and Innovation (CESI) developed a simulation-based training program that evaluates physician effectiveness in preventing shoulder dystocia, a high-risk labor complication in which labor is obstructed by the infant’s shoulder. The project utilized technology that measures the amount of force being applied to a simulated baby, eliminating the subjectivity of a doctor-to-doctor evaluation. “Verdicts in the state of Connecticut have been steadily increasing, with some exceeding $20 million,” said CESI Director Stephen Donahue. The device has given physicians more confidence in their abilities, and protected them from preventable risk that can result in lawsuits.

Read the full Modern Healthcare Simulation Article here!

Summary of Product Demo Video Interviews from IMSH 2017 Trade Show Floor

imsh 2017

Hey Simulation Champions! Today we are sharing a comprehensive review of all the product demonstration interviews HealthySimulation produced exclusively from the International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare 2017 Orlando Tradeshow floor! These videos will help you to catch up with the latest news and information about innovative new products and services entering the field of healthcare simulation, so be sure to watch them all!


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Exclusive IMSH 2017 Exhibit Hall Video Interviews:

Finally, here is the HealthySim staff writeup about our favorite products from IMSH 2017!

OEI Announces RealMom Birthing Simulator Will Debut at INACSL, Creating Paradigm Shift in Labor and Delivery Training

oei realmom birthing simulator

In anticipation of record attendance at this years International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation & Learning Operative Experience (INACSL) in Washington D.C., Operative Experience Inc. (OEI), a leading developer of high-fidelity human patient simulators, announced the launch of RealMom, a “breakthrough, full-body childbirth simulator designed to revolutionize the way clinicians and practitioners develop proficiency in labor and delivery procedures.”

Representatives suggested that RealMom leapfrogs today’s hard-plastic birthing manikins, by providing the most natural and realistic childbirth simulator ever created, featuring incredibly lifelike soft tissue, accurate internal anatomy and an active birth canal with human-like dilation and effacement. RealMom provides learners with a high-adrenaline, “true-to-life” delivery room experience and a full spectrum of clinical scenarios from normal fetal delivery to more complicated procedures, such as breech, shoulder dystocia, nuchal cord, cord prolapse, and assisted delivery with forceps and vacuum devices.

RealMom Features:

  • Lifelike Mother and Baby: Full-body female simulator and full-term baby with unsurpassed realism and lifelike appearance. Features realistic, soft tissue and accurate internal anatomy.Available in Caucasian and African American skin tones.
  • Natural Delivery: First-in-the-world, natural delivery with active, soft tissue birth canal. Provides human-like dilation and effacement with massageable fundus and amniotic reservoir. Includes a fully-realistic uterus, placenta and umbilical cord.
  • Fully Operable: Provides normal delivery, breech, shoulder dystocia, nuchal cord, cord prolapse, transverse and placenta previa, compound delivery, and assisted delivery with forceps or vacuum devices.
  • Postpartum Hemorrhage: Realistic postpartum hemorrhage control with appropriate flow control and the ability to effectively stop hemorrhage with a Bakri or Ebb balloon.
  • Tablet Control: Instructor control of dilation and delivery progression. Physiological presentation and control of maternal and fetal heart rate, fetal heart tones and contractions, pulses, blood pressure and SPO2. Supports iOS, Android and computer browsers.
  • Simple and Affordable: More affordable than other competitive birthing simulators and with no complicated programming or set-ups there’s no simulator downtime.

“RealMom is simply the most exciting development in labor and delivery training to date,” said Jane O’Reilly, Global VP of Sales for OEI. “RealMom looks real and feels real and provides learners with the most realistic and lifelike simulated birthing experience out there. It’s really one of a kind.”

RealMom can be operated wirelessly using an iOS or Android tablet device and provides precise control of dilation and delivery progression as well as heart rate and tones, contractions, pulses, blood pressure and SPO2 levels. As well as being incredibly realistic and lifelike, RealMom is exceptionally reliable with no complicated set-up or programming required of instructors and subsequently no simulator downtime.


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“Operative Experience is already recognized for its groundbreaking line of soft tissue, open surgery simulators for emergency obstetric procedures,” said Mick Navin, President and CEO of OEI. “RealMom is a natural extension of this technology and provides learners and educators with the first ever complete and fully-integrated solution for labor and delivery skills training. We deliver the entire continuum of care, from vaginal delivery through an active birth canal to emergency skin-to-skin C-section, postpartum hemorrhage control enabling practice including uterine artery repair, compression sutures and the Bakri balloon, and c-hyst when hemorrhage cannot be contained.”

OEI will introduce RealMom this week at the annual INACSL conference so be sure to stop by their booth to see this innovative new product!

About Operative Experience, Inc.

Operative Experience, Inc. is on a mission to revolutionize surgical and pre-hospital training. Using medical simulators with unprecedented anatomical and surgical fidelity within a rigorous experiential instructional paradigm, OEI reduces training costs while increasing training effectiveness and retention. OEI is dedicated to applying this technology to reduce combat and civilian surgical mortality and to provide humanitarian support to developing countries with limited medical resources.

Learn more about RealMom at the OEI website today!

LifeCast Body Unveils Hyper Realistic Infant Trainer

infant simulator

Just a quick note today to share about this amazing new infant simulator from LifeCast Body — which HealthySim got a sneak peak of at IMSH. While the device does not have any technology inside currently, the level of realism with the infant was incredible! Educators could make the infant suckle however, through a small port in the back like a puppet.


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From LifeCast Body: Introducing a step change in realism for the medical training industry. Lifecast Body Simulation is developing a range of highly accurate and lifelike “bodies” which will transform the way training is both delivered and absorbed. Designed and produced in Great Britain to the highest quality, the range will include newborn babies, toddler, young adult & geriatric. Lifelike and with a wide range of ethnicity options.

Visit the new LifeCast Body website for more info!

Singapore Simulation Symposium “S3” Has Extended Abstract Deadline to June 30th!

singapore healthcare simulation conference

This October 31st – November 3rd, SESAM, SimGHOSTS and SingHealth are combining powers to create the S3 Simulation Conference event in Singapore, the World’s first multi-organizational simulation event! And great news — the abstract submission deadline has been extended until the end of this month — so there is still a bit more time left to submit and join us this November!

About the S3 Event

Bringing the World of Medical Simulation Together​ The S3 Conference brings together thought​ leaders and cutting-edge ideas from three renowned simulation centers to one place – Academia, located in Singapore General Hospital Campus, Singapore.

Hosted by the SingHealth Duke-NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS), the S3 Conference 2017 is jointly organized by SIMS, Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine (SESAM) and The Gathering Of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists (SimGHOSTS).


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This international tripartite part​nership will provide participating healthcare simulation teams with the best learning and networking opportunities with leading experts worldwide. The S3 Conference aims to be at the pulse of Asia’s simulation industry and to lead the transformation of simulation in the region and beyond.

The theme for the S3 Conference​ this year is, “At the Crossroad of Simulation; Bringing the World together”. ​​​​

Expect transformative sessions with international guest speakers, experience the latest in simulation technology, take in new ideas, share simulation best practices across borders, present ground-breaking simulation studies to fellow industry insiders, receive hands-on training in advanced simulation procedures, and more.​

Learn more and submit your abstract today on the S3 website!