Arch Virtual Partners with Envision to Provide Prospective Medical Students With Realistic Experiences, Becomes Official VR Developer for GE Healthcare

envision arch virtual medical simulation

Just received word from Arch Virtual about their new project with Envision EMI, which provides a way for students to be practicing the field of healthcare before they take their first course with a VR experience! Arch Virtual expanding its business opportunities in healthcare, and with a quality that caught the attention of GE Healthcare! Read below to learn why….

About Envision:

For over 30 years, Envision has delivered transformational career exploration and leadership experiences for high-aspiring students like you. Envisionaries who attend our programs gain hands-on experience and the success skills they need to become our next generation of entrepreneurs, doctors, lawyers, engineers, influencers, journalists, digital media stars, diplomats and leaders.

About the VR Experience

For students considering a career in medicine, it can be difficult to imagine the responsibility of caring for a patient and performing a medical procedure as they consider the commitment of time and money pursuing this career.


Sponsored Advertisement:


With the new VR application we developed for Envision, students can become immersed in a medical environment, working together collaboratively to clean a laceration, inject lidocain, staple the skin, and apply a bandage. “Immersive Virtual Reality represents a unique and compelling way to expose students to places and events they couldn’t otherwise experience. With Arch Virtual, we were able to mimic the operating room environment and allow students to feel what it’s like to be in that theater. Cool stuff!” Dr. Jan Sikorsky – Envision EMI. The application was used at the Johns Hopkins University during Envision’s National Youth Leadership Forum: Advanced Medicine & Health Care this summer.

Official VR Developer of GE Healthcare

Arch Virtual was also thrilled to announce that they are now the official VR development partner for GE Healthcare! GE Healthcare has been a visionary client of Arch Virtual, exploring a variety of case studies and test projects that are pushing the boundaries of the use of VR in healthcare. Arch’s most recent VR application demonstrates the features and benefits of the new GE Senographe Pristina 3D Mammography product. The VR experience has been accompanying a roadshow traveling across the country, introducing health care professionals to this innovative new product.

Check out the Arch Virtual Website to learn more!


Sponsored Advertisement:


Icahn School of Medicine’s Dr. Khouli Presents on Integrating Medical Simulation into Training and Curriculum

sim center

A Department of Medicine Grand Rounds presented by Hassan Khouli, MD, Chief, Critical Care Section; Director, Center for Advanced Medicine Simulation, Mount Sinai West and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine), on Integrating Medical Simulation into Training and Curriculum.


Sponsored Advertisement:


Dr. Khouli founded the first simulation laboratory at Roosevelt Hospital through philanthropic support. The simulation lab expanded to a full institution-wide simulation Center in 2010 and was named the Center for Advanced Medical Simulation (CAMS) with three state-of-the-art simulation laboratories, two full-time simulation specialists,and several faculty from critical care and other departments with specialized expertise and certifications in simulation education and training. The Simulation center has grown exponentially to gain regional and national reputation. The center obtained a rare 5-year full national accreditation status from the Society of Simulation in Healthcare in 2015 to become one of only few accredited simulation centers in the United States. Dr. Khouli established the first simulation fellowship in New York City in 2011. Dr. Khouli has been an invited lecturer regionally, nationally, and internationally. He is on advisory boards and committees of several regional and national organizations and societies. He has been a member of the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law. He has directed several local and regional symposiums. He has received many teaching and community awards.

Learn more about the Center for Advanced Medicine Simulation at Mount Sinai West

University of Birmingham Provides Queen Elizabeth Hospital Patients with VR Physical Therapy

patient vr bicycle pt excercise

Recently ITV created a video report on how researchers from the Human Interface Technologies (HIT) Team at The University of Birmingham have developed a virtual reality cycling program for Queen Elizabeth Hospital. It won’t be long before all physical therapy departments utilize video games for healing patients — as results show that patients remain self-motivated for longer with better rates of improvement.

Patient recovering from major surgery are being given the chance to cycle the Devon coast path from their hospital bed. 


Sponsored Advertisement:


They are now working alongside medical professionals at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital to help patients like Paul Kavanagh in their recovery. Patient in a hospital bed Paul Kavanagh recently had a dual-lung transplant. Credit: ITV News Central It took the team over three years to design and develop ‘Virtual Wembury’, which is based on the village on the south coast of Devon.

Professor Robert Stone who has been working in the field for 30 years, chose the area because he was born and bred there. He says it offers the perfect mix of green, sand and sea for an attractive virtual reality landscape. ‘Virtual Wembury’ landscape The landscape can reflect both day and night scenes. The virtual reality program has been designed to enable doctors and nurses here to use it alongside traditional rehabilitation techniques. If this trial is successful, they are hoping that it might be used in other hospitals across the UK.

We can’t embed the ITV video here, so be sure to check it out on ITV!


Sponsored Advertisement:


Airport Hosts Simulated Crash Exercise for Emergency Preparedness Training

Airport hosts simulated crash exercise for emergency preparedness training

Gosanangelo.com recently reported how loud sirens and flashing lights filled the air in-between the runways at San Angelo Regional Airport recently, as part of an emergency preparedness exercise, which involved a simulated crash between commercial and military aircraft which included irst-responders from the San Angelo Fire Department. The EMS group arrived at the scene to administer ‘aid’ to the ‘victims,’ portrayed by local volunteers, and Goodfellow Air Force Base personnel.

The purpose of the exercise was to help prepare emergency personnel for real-world emergencies, which is a REGULATED practice in the aviation industry!

“It keeps us updated on our training (so that) we’re prepared and ready to handle any situation that takes place,” Firefighter Roger Hernandez said. “We like to keep (first-responders) on their toes,” Santos Elizondo, EMS coordinator for SAFD, added. Firefighter Shane Mathews leads volunteer ‘victims’ to awaiting buses that will take them to local hospitals, where training will continue Thursday, July 13, 2017, at San Angelo Regional Airport. (Photo: Cara DeLoach) The mock scenario went like this: a military aircraft had been in the process of landing at the airport, when it collided with a passenger aircraft stopped on the run-way.


Sponsored Advertisement:


Following the script, the pilot and co-pilot of the military aircraft have ejected; one has serious injuries, and the other deceased, and 24 civilian passengers were scattered across the field with varying ‘injuries.’

Rescue crews followed protocol responding to the situation, first putting out the aircraft ‘fires’ and proceeding to help the injured, who used prosthetic makeup to simulate fake wounds. Responders applied first-aid to victims, and classified their injuries according to severity — all while being observed by leaders from the Office of Emergency Management and the San Angelo Fire Department. 

Simulations like these are “important because you can control an exercise. You can control how many dead, injured and missing you have … In real world situations you don’t really have too much of a control. You just try to make sure the damage doesn’t spread out,” said Zak Dale, who created the fake injuries, and works in Medical Logistics at Goodfellow Air Force Base.”

Watch: Gardaí Simulate Terror Attack at Dublin’s Docklands

Watch: Gardaí test response to terror attack in simulation at Dublin's Docklands

The Irish-based Gardai engaged with a counter-terrorism exercise in Dublin recently to test their response in the event of a mass casualty terrorist attack. The simulation, codenamed ’Sciath’, involved a number of actors at the Docklands railway station in Dublin’s north inner city and the garda units involved today had not been told ahead of time what would be involved.

Does your simulation program work with local Civil Service Groups to provide simulated training opportunities? The promotional opportunities to develop new business opportunities and showcase your simulation program are clearly evident!


Sponsored Advertisement:


As part of the simulation, the men inside acted out assaulting a number of people inside the station. Armed officers used stun grenades and blank rounds, shooting one of the suspects and securing the scene. “Today has demonstrated the professionalism and the capability that we have,” Garda Commissioner Nóirín O’Sullivan told reporters after the training exercise was finished. “Incidents like this can happen. We have to make sure that we are ready to respond to those incidents. In the last few days we have given instructions to all of our members and I think we wanted to see how those instructions would work,” she said.

The Commissioner said simulations such as today’s operation are prioritised in high density areas like Dublin city, but she said further exercises will take place in other parts of the country to test response times outside the capital.


Supported Organization:


Mixed and Augmented Reality Can Facilitate Seamless Medical Communication

ar-healthcare-simulation

MedicalResearch.com recently interviewed Birmingham City University Associate Professor Dr. Ian Williams PhD about the work of the DMT lab on mixed and augmented reality for healthcare simulated training. Make no mistake, VR and AR are the future of healthcare simulated training:

Dr. Williams: Our work at the DMT Lab (dmtlab.bcu.ac.uk) focuses on developing a novel Mixed Reality (MR) medical presentation platform which allows practitioners to interact with patient data and virtual anatomical models in real time. The system enables the presentation of medical data, models and procedures to patients with the aim of educating them on pending procedures or the effects of lifestyle choices (for example the effects of smoking or excessive alcohol consumption).

The system employs an exocentric mixed reality environment which can be deployed in any room. It integrates a medical practitioner in real time with multimodal patient data and the corresponding result is a real time co-located visualisation of both the practitioner and the data, which they can interact with in real time.  We implement a natural interaction method into the system which improves a user’s level of direct interaction with the virtual models and provides a more realistic control of the data.

The system can also be used in a fun educational setting where patients, students, children or any naive user, can learn about medical anatomical information via a real-time interactive mixed reality “body scanner”. This fun system overlays the MR information onto their own body in real-time and shows them scaled and interactive virtual organs, anatomy and corresponding medical information. We are aiming for this system to be used not only in patient education but also in engaging and informing people on lifestyle choices.


Sponsored Advertisement:


MedicalResearch.com: What types of medical or surgical problems do you envision can be enhanced with the use of free hand gestures to manipulate patient data?

Dr. Williams: Mixed reality has enormous potential within the medical field, with healthcare being profoundly affected by some recent developments. Mixed reality technology can also provide the platform for facilitating a seamless doctor-patient communications in real time. The system we are developing can provide a real time augmented view of the patient’s data which can be overlaid onto the patient, or interacted with via freehand interaction without the use of complex wearable devices.

Many current mixed reality systems rely on bespoke sensors and cumbersome wearable devices (for example haptic gloves) whereas we work in freehand interaction without the need for a medical practitioner or patient to wear any complex wearable device. This interaction method enables a more natural virtual interface and via the use of naturally inspired physical interaction models (for example common real grasping types) we bridge the gap between users and technology. This form of natural interaction can also enable an interaction which can be perceived as more realistic to the observer.

Medical Group Readies Complaint Over Use of Live Pigs for Training Instead of Simulators

live animal training instead of simulators for healthcare

Last week the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine announced they will file a federal complaint against the University of Missouri School of Medicine, questioning the legality of the school’s use of live animals for emergency medicine residency training — as reported by the Columbia Tribune.

Consider that if enough healthcare groups complained about the abuse of animals for medical training, that simulators would grow in adoption and utilization, as this article clearly points out! Does your healthcare program have an animal rights group? Perhaps as a simulation center representative you should connect with them to explore collaborative options of mutually beneficial support!

In the complaint, which the committee emailed to the Tribune on Friday, the national not-for-profit organization of 12,000 physicians asserts that the training program does not meet the requirements of the Animal Welfare Act of 1966. Emergency residents practice several medical procedures on live pigs, and “this animal use is at odds with the current standards of practice in emergency medicine training,” the committee said in the complaint.

The committee conducted a survey of 168 emergency medicine programs nationwide and found that 150 of them, or 89 percent, did not use animals to train residents. Four of those 150 programs are in Missouri, including the University of Missouri-Kansas City, which is part of the UM System along with the Columbia campus. In the complaint, the committee said these 150 programs use only human-based simulation to practice the procedures that MU’s residents practice on pigs. 

Because the MU School of Medicine uses live animals despite the existence of alternative methods and has not provided “objective evidence to support” doing so, the school is breaking the law, the organization said in the complaint. However, Foundation for Biomedical Research President Matthew Bailey said in an email that nationwide, doctors do not have a general consensus that simulation can replace the use of animals in physician training.


Sponsored Advertisement:


“While simulators have become increasingly advanced in recent years, and make good adjuncts to training, many doctors do not agree that they provide an adequate level of training before operating on live people,” Bailey said. “They simply aren’t a full replacement in every case, yet.”

Human-based simulators “are not yet capable of replicating the human condition” in the case of some injuries, Bailey said. He gave the example of traumatic injuries that members of the military might suffer in combat. The Association of American Medical Colleges on its website says that the role of live animals in research is “irreplaceable” and that animals are “vital in the medical education continuum.”

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine attributes its information about MU’s emergency medicine training program from a protocol document the committee obtained. According to the document, trainees cut into and open the throats and chests of the live pigs in order to insert needles and tubes and repair an injury to the pericardium, a sac surrounding the heart. The trainees continue the procedures even if the pig dies in the process, but if it survives, they kill it before they perform the final procedure.

The committee will send the complaint to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Animal Care Unit, which is the division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture responsible for enforcing the Animal Welfare Act. The complaint asks APHIS to investigate MU’s medical school and enforce penalties for what the committee sees as breaches of federal law.

EMSWorld Interviews Moulage Concepts Founder Bobbie Merica About Simulation Realism Through Makeup

EMSWorld recently interviewed Moulage expert Bobbie Merica of MoulageConcepts.com to learn how moulage makeup can improve the educational outcomes of simulation by increasing the realism for learners. Here are a couple of excerpts from the EMSWorld article entitled The Importance of Accuracy in Moulage Trainingby Valeria Amato:

What advice would you give people who are looking to implement more realistic and effective moulage into training regimens?

It’s like anything else: You need to plan and prepare. When you develop your case scenarios, decide what the takeaway is going to be. Is it triage-specific? If so, then your wounds should accurately represent wounds related to triage. A lot of the time, people will throw in the moulage piece at the end without giving it any thought. They won’t collectively decide what the full-thickness burn is going to look like, what the pediatric patient will look like and how they’re going to present it. Locate an accurate picture on the Internet of an actual case. Practice creating moulage so that everyone in your training knows what these wounds will look like.

Mostly it’s about the planning. You’d never run your training scenarios without a great deal of planning. When you’re building those scenarios, start building in those moulage components. Understand what story you want to tell. Understand what the training outcome is. Is intubation with a full-thickness burn the outcome, or is it identifying the smoke inhalation? If the training outcome is smoke inhalation, then you don’t need a full-thickness burn. It’s not difficult to clarify that a full-thickness burn in the upper airway in the chest and neck has smoke inhalation. If you really want to know if someone has smoke inhalation, bring it back and test it in multiple areas. Create that eye-reddening, some tears coming down, the reddening in the back of the throat. That little bit of hoarseness. Break it out into multiple training avenues, unless intubating the patient with a full-thickness burn is the skill set.


Sponsored Advertisement:


That makes sense, especially going back to what you said about using moulage in less of a theatrical capacity and for mass-casualty incidents.

If it’s a mass-casualty incident, you’re going to have some people who look like those first-line-of-response people, but often a lot of those people look the same. Certainly you should assess the woman screaming and covered in blood, but you might also want to look at that person quietly dying right next to her. It’s about creating all those aspects and using this as a tool to define where those strengths are and, more important, where those weaknesses are so you know how to align future training dollars.

I think every person, every entity and every training site should have access to this level of training. Moulage doesn’t have to be expensive and time-consuming. You can have amazing moulage that tells the whole story, allowing you to spend the next six weeks accurately training your participants to meet outcomes, that will cost you pennies.

Do you have a copy of Bobbie’s Best Selling Moulage Recipe Book? Check out our review here!

Air Canada Almost in Deadliest Accident in Aviation History — CRM Training Saves Countless Lives

sfo near miss aviation simulation

Yesterday in San Francisco (July 10, 2017), Mercury News reporter MATTHIAS GAFNI wrote how Air Canada pilots almost landed an Airbus 320 onto the jetway where four other planes were waiting to take off. The incident provides a strong example of why Crew Resource Management (CRM) communication protocols allowed for everyone involved to create awareness, recommendations, and change. In this case that “must hear” communication helped save almost a thousand lives.

SAN FRANCISCO — In what one aviation expert called a near-miss of what could have been the largest aviation disaster ever, an Air Canada pilot on Friday narrowly avoided a tragic mistake: landing on the San Francisco International Airport taxiway instead of the runway.

Sitting on Taxiway C shortly before midnight were four airplanes full of passengers and fuel awaiting permission to take off, according to the Federal Aviation Administration, which is investigating the “rare” incident. An air traffic controller sent the descending Air Canada Airbus 320 on a “go-around” — an unusual event where pilots must pull up and circle around to try again — before the safe landing, according to the federal agency. FAA investigators are still trying to determine how close the Air Canada aircraft came to landing and potentially crashing into the four aircraft below, but the apparent pilot error already has the aviation industry buzzing.


Sponsored Advertisement:


“If it is true, what happened probably came close to the greatest aviation disaster in history,” said retired United Airlines Capt. Ross Aimer, CEO of Aero Consulting Experts. He said he’s been contacted by pilots from across the country about the incident. “If you could imagine an Airbus colliding with four passenger aircraft wide bodies, full of fuel and passengers, then you can imagine how horrific this could have been,” he said.

You can bet that this exact scenario conditions will be programmed into simulators around the world, especially for those pilots flying into San Francisco. As well, I am sure that the Ground Control teams at SFO will take a deep look at the lighting patterns for the runway to see what else could be  done to better indicate approaching flights.

In aviation, such near misses cause huge safety investigations from multiple agencies. When does that happen in healthcare for our near misses? — Why is TeamStepps training not mandatory for healthcare professionals like CRM is for aviation industry professionals? Possibly because the lives of the healthcare providers aren’t also on the line, only their patients. Harsh as that may sound, why else would healthcare not force adoption of the issue, like aviation did? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below.

Read the Whole Mercury News Story About the Never-Event here

A Sim Tech Shares Why You Should Come to SimGHOSTS 2017 USA

simghosts sim training

Simulation Operator Rachel Bailey  recently shared with the simulation community why she suggests attending SimGHOSTS.


There is still time to register for the 2017 USA Event
Next month at WakeMed in Raleigh, NC August 1st-4th

From Rachel: SimGHOSTS is a community of hard working technicians that adapt to any environment given to them.    As technicians we work over 8 hours a day, and when we are not working, we are thinking about what we can do better in the simulation community.  We volunteer for projects, we come in early and stay late.  You have to love the job in order to stay in the field.  The hours we work and the constant struggle to ensure things operate well, can weigh heavily.  Sometimes we are in a no- win situation but it never prevents us from thinking of how to improve simulations for educators and learners.


Sponsored Advertisement:


Being a sim tech is not the easiest job, nor the most rewarding, we do the job because we love it.  The demand of the job can leave us discouraged and burnt out, but when August comes around, we get to meet with people that are just like us and experience the same highs and lows of simulation operations.  I have attended several SimGHOSTS conferences, I get the pleasure of meeting new technicians, hearing their ideas, and seeing there fabrications.  The passion of this community is something to experience.  It is not about where you went to college, it is not about who you know, this conference is strictly about the job that we all love.

A fellow sim tech stated her experience at SimGHOSTS, as her “date night” with her job.  I couldn’t agree with her more.  This conference is more than educational, it is empowering.  When I thought I could not take one more reminder of what didn’t work , or how much time I spend at my job, that a select few really understand, I go to SimGHOSTS as a reminder that I really love what I do, and I love the community I am involved in.  I have attended SimGHOSTS as a presenter and a participant, and the community is the most inquisitive, intelligent, and involved in simulation technology that I have ever experienced.  People are proud and willing to share ideas and projects.  Every time I attend I am empowered to do my job for another year.

Whether you are tech, educator, coordinator, or director, the education you receive at SimGHOSTS is as unique as the people sharing what they have learned.  If you haven’t been to a conference, I urge you to try to persuade your leadership to invest in your education and your professional development.  See you in Carolina!

Learn more about joining Rachel at SimGHOSTS 2017 USA this Aug. 1-4!