RemedySim Provides Affordable and Realistic Customizable Injection Trainers

remedysim injection pad simulator

Check out these new simulated injection pads from RemedySim! Improve training with auto-injecting devices, used by EMTs, nurses, teachers, parents, and patients. Be prepared for every scenario by practicing your technique and teaching others with Remedy’s Injection Pads. The tools come in two flavors:

  • PATRICK is your choice for a larger working area. Skin pad can be pinched and spread to simulate SubQ, IM, and Z-Track Injections.
  • PADDY offers a more compact working area. It is great for traveling practitioners and training on the road.

Realistic Puncture resistance mimics the feel of an actual injection and triggers most auto-injectors. Both injection pads can also be used for intra-muscular and subcutaneous injections. Use with our removable epidermis layer to simulate intra-dermal injections. Construction and materials will meet requirements for airline carry-on items.



About RemedySim

Remedy Simulation Group uses the best combination of old school production methods and cutting edge technology providing solutions to the medical community. Remedy offers our own line of Medical Simulation products developed from customer input. They build all products in the United States and provide the same innovative production methods to medical startups and other medical simulation companies via Contract Manufacturing. Speed and cost are addressed with the use of cutting edge 3D printing equipment. Their Rapid Anatomy branded service allows us to develop products faster and provide the medical community with custom patient anatomy in a physical form you can hold and explore. Remedy Simulation Group looks forward to working with you to Improve the Standard of Practice.

Learn more on the RemedySim website!


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New Healthcare Simulation Safety Org Provides Free Safety Stickers and More

simulated use only warning label

A concerned group of simulation champions have created a new organization to help ensure that medical supplies designated for use in simulation are not accidentally used in patient care. The website provides FREE warning templates or allows you to order some pre-made stickers for your simulation lab. HealthySim applauds this new groups innovation and concern for this very real issue! Some years ago patients were given simulated IV bags which caused numerous illnesses which you can read about here.

About the Warning Label Stickers

Standardized “Not for human use / education only” labels have been designed in three sizes to be affixed to all simulation equipment, supplies, and medications. They can be purchased here as self-stick laminated labels in rolls of 250 for the printing cost plus shipping and a handling fee. Alternatively, templates for printing your own labels on Avery adhesive label sheets can be downloaded (note – they will not be waterproof unless you laminate them).

About the Healthcare Simulation Safety Project



“The spread of simulation throughout the healthcare world has been a wonderful technique to improve education, teamwork, and patient safety. Thousands of programs around the world are actively innovating every day to deliver high quality simulation sessions in a variety of settings with a wide array of educational goals. Promoting this evolution must not stop, as the aspirations and achievements are truly remarkable. However, there are dangers lurking.

As with anything new, unanticipated and subtle hazards exist and can be difficult to manage. In healthcare simulation we are introducing programs with its array of real and simulated equipment, supplies, and medications. We also bring a certain degree of deception, asking people to act as if things that are not real are true and things that are real are not. All of these introductions are into a healthcare world that has its own difficulties maintaining a safe and error free environment. The chance that this new world of simulation will lead to an accidental misuse of some simulated entity on a real patient or healthcare worker is real and worrisome.

On this website, we will try to present accidents and “near misses” from healthcare simulation that come to our attention. We will try to use the collective wisdom of the field to present best practices and mitigation strategies to help the simulation community reduce the potential for harm. Working together we hope to make the chance of a simulation related injury vanishing small. label The Foundation for Healthcare Simulation Safety has applied for 501-C3 not-for-profit status, as it has been established solely to promote education and safe practices for healthcare simulation programs.”

Learn more and get your free resources on the Healthcare Simulation Safety Website!

Cardionics IMSH 2017 Trade Show Floor Video Interview – New SAM3 & SimShirt!

cardionics simshirt

At IMSH 2017 HealthySimulation.com was on hand to interview the team from Cardionics about some of the awesome new products they launched at the show, including SAM 3 and the SimShirt. Stay tuned for more great IMSH video interview coverage!



SAM, the Student Auscultation Manikin 3rd Generation is an innovation in teaching and learning heart, lung, and bowel sounds. SAM’s brand new computer software interface includes Case Videos, a Real Sound Library, Echo Cardiogram Videos, and ECG Waveform for heart sounds.

The SimShirt is a garment worn by a Standardized Patient (SP) for simulating physiological conditions to test students and examine their diagnostic and procedural skills. SimShirt provides a second choice to wearing the RFID sensor tags required by the SimScope. Instead of wearing individual RFID sensor tags adhered to bare skin, the tags are integrated inside the SimShirt.  The SimShirt system has multiple uses in simulation. It can be worn by a Standardized Patient or also by a high-fidelity manikin. You can program the SimScope to play desired sounds from our vast sound library which is already embedded in the SimScope tablet. Once the standardized patient wears the SimShirt, the SimScope will read the RFID sensor tags placed within the SimShirt and your students will hear the programmed sounds of your choice through the scope. You can put the SimShirt on a low-fidelty manikin too to help increase simulation realism!

Learn more about the SAM3, SimShirt and Other New Products on the Cardionics Website!


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Active Shooter Moulage Training Program and Kits Now Available from MoulageConcepts + Upcoming Training Dates

active shooter moulage training program kit

Our great friends at MoulageConcepts recently launched a new active shooter training program along with specialized moulage build kit. MoulageConcepts founder Bobbie Merica is a world renown expert in healthcare simulation resources, and has written the most comprehensive moulage recipe book on the market… read our review of her book Medical Moulage here!

Upcoming Moulage Trainings:

  • Medical – Trauma Moulage Workshop Fayette MO. June 8-9, 2017
  • All Hazards/Medical Moulage Workshop Nokesville VA. May 18-19, 2017
  • All Hazards Trauma Moulage Workshop Pomona CA. June 29, 2017
  • All Hazards/Medical Moulage Workshop Folsom CA. July 20-21, 2017

More than just a moulage company, MoulageConcepts provides interactive training workshops are designed to enhance realism, scenario staging, and hazard identification. This intensive, hands-on, 16-hour workshop is regularly presented in a multi-level learner approach including:

  • Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced moulage development
  • Scenario Staging
  • Sensory Engagement
  • Core STEPS and Technique
  • Accessory Moulage & Layering
  • Wound Customization
  • Time and Budget Saving Options

These two-day workshops are developed to save you time and money upfront, exceeding your training needs, wound for wound, as an industry standard.



Active Shooter Program and Moulage Kit

As the industry leader, MoulageConcepts understands the complexities of creating interactive training that meet your safety-preparedness needs. With an extensive knowledge of moulage wound development and scenario staging, Moulage Concepts provides a unique combination of simulation expertise to strengthen training performance, participant retention, and risk reduction. Working with both simulator and standardized patients, they provide measurable training options to meet your industry requirements.

The Active Shooter/Mass Casualty (AS/MCI) Moulage & Training Kit was developed to assist you in preparing for Active Shooter Incident Response. Including moulage specific to wound identification and treatment, this multi-training kit enables team practice of rapid assessment, airway management, and hemorrhagic response- with focused training realism and incident standardization. Utilizing interactive wounds that are quick, cost effective and most importantly, convincing- MoulageConcepts provides the visual and olfactory realism required in developing an effective Emergency Operations Response with multi-skin tones.

 

Learn more about these workshops, programs and kits on the MoulageConcepts website!

Final Deadline for SimGHOSTS USA Abstract Submission is TODAY by 12PM Pacific!

simghosts hourglass

Today is the day to submit your abstracts for SimGHOSTS USA 2017!
Accepted presentations provide a $50 discount for lead presenter’s registration!

Share your ideas and projects with the community, connect with others, and plan future collaboration by presenting at SimGHOSTS 2017 USA!  The due date to submit your proposal is TODAY BY 12pm PST!

Submit Your SG17USA Proposal here!

We are now accepting proposals in the following categories for SG17USA:



  • Podium Presentations (lecture with powerpoint)
  • Workshops (hands-on activity, 2 to 4 hours long)
  • Poster Presentations (“Science Fair” type of explanation of project, program, research, etc)
  • DIY Contest Entry (live demonstration or online video of a technology hack, unique design or other project)
  • Hackathon Workshop (A 4hr workshop to ‘hack’ a new product, service, or project that could better support the simulation industry)

Accepted Podium Presentations earn one (1) $50 registration discount for one of the presenters. Accepted Workshops earn $50 registration discount for up to three (3) presenters. Accepted DIY & Poster proposals will be eligible for competition in the DIY Contest and Poster Exhibition. For both types of proposals, we will be selecting a Best In Show judged by SimGHOSTS representatives, as well as a Community Award voted on by event attendees. Prizes will be distributed during the Awards Ceremony.

SimGHOSTS Topic Categories are:

  • Audiovisual Technology
  • Information Technology Management
  • Administration Medical/Clinical Topics
  • Moulage
  • Simulation Technology
  • Professional Development
  • Educational practices

SG17USA Event info:

Location: WakeMed Center for Innovative Learning
Raleigh, North Carolina
Pre-Symposium: August 1st, 2017
Symposium: August 2nd-4th, 2017

Learn more about the SimGHOSTS 2017 USA Event HERE!

New Debrief 2 Learn Podcast: Circular Questions in Debriefing

healthcare simulation debriefing podcast

Our friends at Debrief 2 Learn have produced another awesome podcast, this time covering circular questions in debriefing! Debrief2Learn aims to improve healthcare outcomes by fostering effective feedback and debriefing practices.

About this Podcast

Walter Eppich and Michaela Kolbe talk about the use of circular questions in debriefing healthcare teams. As a psychologist and family therapist, Michaela used circular questions to promote perspective taking and reflection about family interactions. In this podcast, Michaela explains how she adapted this approach for healthcare debriefing and provides multiple examples. She also discusses an article she and her team wrote entitled: How to debrief teamwork interactions: using circular questions to explore and change team interaction patterns!

About Michaela



Michaela Kolbe, PhD is a psychologist and the Director of the Simulation Center of the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. She uses simulation for training clinicians and for her research in education, psychology and organizational behavior. She publishes widely in psychological, healthcare, and simulation journals and books and is a member of several editorial boards.

About Walter

Walter Eppich practices pediatric emergency medicine at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. He teaches about simulation, faculty development, and debriefing around the world. A candidate for a PhD in Medical Education at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, Walter studies the role of talk as a medium of learning for individuals and teams. He is a co-founder of Debrief2Learn.

Listen to the podcast on Debrief 2 Learn here!

88% of US-Born Sex Trafficking Victims Receive Medical Care – USF Med Student Creates Simulation Scenario to Help ID Warning Signs

Human Trafficking, Behind the Scene

Michelle Lyman, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine is a third year medical student, has created a simulation scenario to help healthcare providers better identify those who may be victims of sex trafficking. Recently she shared about the experience and the reasons why she built the scenario on in-training.org. I have reached out to Michelle in the hopes that she will share her scenario with us so stay tuned to this article for future updates!

In-Training.org Excerpt:

“Physicians across many specialties are treating trafficked persons in their practice. Yet, they are not trained to recognize human trafficking or know how to intervene. Studies have shown that 88% of US-born sex trafficking victims reported receiving medical care while being trafficked . This puts healthcare providers in a key position with these vulnerable individuals to aid in identification, prevention and intervention, but only if they are educated about the clinical presentations of human trafficking. In an effort to increase health care’s capacity to fight human trafficking, I worked behind the scenes at my medical school’s simulation center, creating a clinical scenario centered on treating a trafficked person for my fellow students to learn from.

This case was designed to expose future physicians to the complexity of human trafficking. The simulation center provides a learning environment to explore uneasy feelings in difficult clinical scenarios and practice building trust. It is okay to become flustered and misspeak — this experience is formative; however, when the students are the practicing physicians in a few short years, stakes are higher. Watching through the two-way mirror, I saw students grow. Most were courteous; however, few took the extra effort to build a certain degree of trust with their distracted patient sitting on the examination table. This patient’s clipped responses to questions often intimidated many students, leading them to shy away from asking heavy questions about her history with abuse.



Patients benefited the most from those students who were compassionate. Students who succeeded built a relationship by being empathetic. They looked beyond the exterior of a stoic young woman and offered her confidentiality, demonstrating respect for her decision to disclose. Their tone was non-judgmental and gentle when they took notice of her brandings that signaled her trafficking history. I also watched as standardized patients shut down and students walked away unaware. Some sped through their mental checklist, forgetting that simply looking and inspecting the patient might tell them more than a blood test. Others took too direct an approach, demanding a more detailed history, only to be met with a wall of resistance and no new information.

For the simulation case, the patient sitting on the exam table is a collection of narratives from individuals who have experienced human trafficking and survived. It is my goal that by interacting with this patient, students will learn from their missteps now and be able to see the signs of trafficking for what it is later. After all, being cognizant enough to recognize a patient in need of resources to advocate for their own health is all part of the job. Empathy and empowerment thereafter are crucial, but being able to provide such values takes practice and dedication.”

Michelle is in the SELECT Program at the University of South Florida. Originally from Jacksonville Florida, Michelle currently lives in Allentown, Pennsylvania where she is completing her third year clerkships. She is interested in public health and patient advocacy.

Update: Abstract Deadline PUSHED for SimGHOSTS USA to March 7th!

simghosts hourglass

UPDATE! The deadline has been extended until March 7th for USA! SimGHOSTS @ SESAM Paris is closed!

Share your ideas and projects with the community, connect with others, and plan future collaboration by presenting at SimGHOSTS 2017 USA!  The due date to submit your proposal is *UPDATE* now March 7th!

Submit Your SG17USA Proposal here!

Submit Your SimGHOSTS Track @ SESAM Paris Here!

We are now accepting proposals in the following categories for SG17USA:



  • Podium Presentations (lecture with powerpoint)
  • Workshops (hands-on activity, 2 to 4 hours long)
  • Poster Presentations (“Science Fair” type of explanation of project, program, research, etc)
  • DIY Contest Entry (live demonstration or online video of a technology hack, unique design or other project)
  • Hackathon Workshop (A 4hr workshop to ‘hack’ a new product, service, or project that could better support the simulation industry)

Accepted Podium Presentations earn one (1) $50 registration discount for one of the presenters. Accepted Workshops earn $50 registration discount for up to three (3) presenters. Accepted DIY & Poster proposals will be eligible for competition in the DIY Contest and Poster Exhibition. For both types of proposals, we will be selecting a Best In Show judged by SimGHOSTS representatives, as well as a Community Award voted on by event attendees. Prizes will be distributed during the Awards Ceremony.

SimGHOSTS Topic Categories are:

  • Audiovisual Technology
  • Information Technology Management
  • Administration Medical/Clinical Topics
  • Moulage
  • Simulation Technology
  • Professional Development
  • Educational practices

SG17USA Event info:

Location: WakeMed Center for Innovative Learning
Raleigh, North Carolina
Pre-Symposium: August 1st, 2017
Symposium: August 2nd-4th, 2017

Learn more about the SimGHOSTS 2017 USA Event HERE!

7 Pasos para Lograr un Crecimiento Récord en su Programa de Simulación Medica: Parte 1

growing a simulation program

This is a Spanish translation of our article 7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program: Part 1 transcribed by Alfred de Jesús Toledo de Lima Director del Centro de Simulación COSMOS en Universidad Nacional Pedro Henríquez Ureña! Thanks Alfred!

Este mes hemos estado cubriendo consideraciones clave de negocios que su personal de simulación necesita tener en cuenta para construir o expandir el programa. Los artículos anteriores en esta serie incluyen el “Lenguaje de las ventas – cómo aumentar su presupuesto para simulación” y “3 recursos dominantes para ampliar su programa de simulación”.

En el artículo de hoy comparto cómo, siendo Director del Centro de Simulación Clínica de Las Vegas, pude obtener $ 250,000 USD en contratos de negocios externos en sólo dos años. Estos fondos adicionales ayudaron al centro a contratar personal adicional y a comprar nuevos equipos. Por lo tanto, tenga en cuenta que aunque este artículo se centra en los contratos externos, centrarse en los materiales presentados aquí también le ayudará a ampliar sus servicios de simulación hasta en los departamentos internos dentro de su institución.

La discusión se centra en 7 áreas clave necesarias para crear un embudo de ventas exitoso para sus servicios de simulación, los primeros 3 de los cuales cubriremos hoy:

  1. Obtención de apoyo
  2. Construir un programa
  3. Aprovechar oportunidades
  4. Mercadearse usted mismo
  5. Proporcionar servicios de calidad
  6. Obtención de retroalimentación
  7. Perfeccionamiento de los sistemas
  1. Obtencion de apoyo

Antes de que yo empezara a construir un programa de simulación externo, sabía que tendría que obtener el apoyo del liderazgo ejecutivo de nuestro departamento para dedicar tiempo y energía concentrándome en clientes fuera de nuestros grupos de interés internos. En el CSCLV este liderazgo eran los Decanos de las escuelas colaborativas compartiendo el espacio (todos los cuales estaban bajo el techo del Sistema de Educación Superior de Nevada UNLV, NSC y UNSOM).

Después de nuestro primer año de utilización, pude demostrar a los decanos que los espacios de nuestro centro no estaban siendo utilizados durante muchas noches y fines de semana. Esto fue seguido por el recordatorio de la oportunidad de “alquilar” esos espacios a grupos que podrían estar interesados en capacitar a sus estudiantes de atencion medica o estar en un centro que se vea como de atención médica pero sin pacientes reales. Los decanos acordaron que una exploración del desarrollo de negocios externos podría ayudar a cubrir los costos no sólo del tiempo de trabajo necesario para manejar esos compromisos, sino tambien el tiempo de trabajo adicional para ayudar a nuestros propios programas y también para pagar por nuevos equipos en el futuro cuando fuera necesario.

Los decanos me recordaron que tendría que obtener permiso para una cuenta especial del sistema estatal para obtener ingresos, y que tendría que generar una plantilla de contrato para los usuarios externos para proteger el centro – una que exigiera a los programas externos una prueba de estar asegurados para cubrir cualquier accidente. Después de esto me reuní con el soporte legal del Centro de la UNLV para tratar todas estas preocupaciones con el fin de obtener la aprobación final en el inicio de un programa externo.

  1. Construir un programa

Lo más importante a recordar al iniciar el desarrollo de un nuevo programa de simulación, interno o externo, es comenzar en pequeño. Al crear un programa exitoso que sea manejable y repetible, su equipo puede “enjuagar y repetir” en modo automatico mientras reserva energías de desarrollo para proyectos más grandes. Recuerde que el personal se fatiga con información nueva, nuevos procesos, nuevas tecnologías y nuevos sistemas. Al apuntar demasiado alto al principio, nos arriesgamos a agotarnos nosotros mismos y nuestros programas. Con un programa más pequeño, podemos estar seguros de no extender nuestros recursos demasiado rápido y agotarlos. Recuerde, el objetivo es el éxito a largo plazo del programa – y pasos más pequeños nos ayudarán a construir sobre nuestros logros y, en última instancia, avanzar más lejos, más rápido.

Esta mentalidad ayudó a nuestro equipo a escoger nuestro primer cliente externo, el curso de ATLS del Hospital del Condado que quedaba junto a nosotros. El grupo estaba buscando un nuevo anfitrión que les proporcionara el espacio para el entrenamiento, y para almacenar los materiales necesarios para los cursos. Sus educadores proporcionarian el entrenamiento, y el mercadeo local. Nuestro personal almacenaría su equipo, les proporcionaría espacio, proporcionaría mercadeo adicional y aseguraría una pequeña tarifa por nuestro trabajo.



Este reducido programa de 2 días permitió a nuestro equipo trabajar con cientos de situaciones que surgieron sin sobrecargar nuestro horario de trabajo de “8 a 5” dedicado a los usuarios internos de nuestro programa de simulación. Puntos como catering, recolección de pagos, horarios, contratos y preocupaciones de seguridad fueron abordados durante los 2 meses previos al primer evento. ¡Cómo resolveriamos con el aparcamiento y direcciones al salon mismo tambien necesitaba ser considerado! Las ganancias de este programa fueron pequeñas, apenas unos $ 1500 USD por evento de fin de semana.

Evidentemente aprendimos muchas cosas del primer programa en el Centro que luego incorporamos en eventos futuros (más sobre esto luego). Lo importante a destacar aquí es que después de este curso ahora podríamos manejar programas más grandes, más largos y más caros para clientes externos. Después de esto, lanzamos cursos de capacitación basados en simulación en colaboración con un consultor externo que duraron entre 4-5 días y requirieron mucho más apoyo por parte de nuestro personal en cuanto a experiencias de simulación, marketing y administración. Los beneficios de estos eventos aumentaron a unos $ 6.000 USD por evento.

Después de completar con éxito varios de estos entrenamientos, estábamos listos para programas de varias semanas con hospitales locales y escuelas privadas que terminaron generando $ 50,000 USD + contratos. Si hubiéramos empezado desde la nada a este alto nivel de servicio, estoy seguro de que no habríamos podido proporcionar programas de alta calidad los cuales son necesarios para asegurar relaciones de apoyo a largo plazo y testimonios positivos, mientras minimizamos los niveles de estrés del personal.

  1. Aprovechar oportunidades

Considere ¿Que hace que su programa de simulación sea especial? ¿Qué servicios puede proporcionar su equipo, centro, programa que los interesados internos o clientes externos pueden necesitar? Piense en pequeño y piense en grande: ¿qué grupos locales podrían beneficiarse de los contratos de capacitación permanente a largo plazo y qué grupos internacionales visitarían su centro para programas de capacitación especializada? ¿A qué equipo poco común tiene acceso su programa actualmente? ¿Está usted ubicado en un destino de viaje?

El CSCLV está ubicado en Las Vegas, lo que significa que puede atraer a personas de todo el mundo que estén interesadas en obtener Certificados de Educacion Continua mientras viajan a una ubicación divertida. ¿Qué oportunidades únicas ofrece su equipo, facultad, programa y ciudad a los clientes potenciales?

Otro beneficio de Las Vegas es su proximidad a Hollywood, que ayudó a Nuestro Centro De Simulación A Tener Su Día Más Rentable De La Historia. Las compañías de producción pagarán mucho dinero para alquilar instalaciones que parezcan localidades clínicas pero que no tengan pacientes reales de los que preocuparse.

Saber lo que puede ofrecer a los clientes locales, regionales, nacionales e internacionales le permitirá identificar y construir programas que hablarán y atraerán nuevos negocios a su programa.

¿Está interesado en una inmersión más profunda en estos temas?

¡Eche un vistazo a las 8 sesiones grabadas del evento HealthySimAdmin de forma gratuita después de inscribirse en el boletín mensual de HealthySim!

* Actualización: La segunda parte de esta serie de artículos ya está disponible, la cual nos proporciona 4 ideas más necesarias para hacer crecer su programa de simulación: ¡Marketing, entrega, retroalimentación y crecimiento!

Intelligent Video Solutions Brings Robust A/V Recording & Debriefing Systems To Healthcare Simulation

ivs medical simulation debriefing system

Intelligent Video Solutions (IVS), has provided numerous industries a/v recording systems since 2001. IVS develops software that enables end users to leverage the power of video to increase their programs effectiveness. Driven by a goal to deliver excellence in all phases of a project and backed by 15 years of experience, the team at Intelligent Video Solutions suggests they can meet any challenge — which is why they have started expanding into healthcare simulation.

About IVS and VALT

IVS develops software that enables end users to leverage the power of video to increase their programs’ effectiveness. Driven by the goal to deliver excellence in all phases of a project and backed by 15 years of experience the team at Intelligent Video Solutions can meet any challenge.

IVS suggests they approach the simulation video observation, recording and debriefing challenge from a different perspective because they have taken feedback and developed a new tool to address an old challenge. At it’s core their VALT solution is an incredibly simple but powerful tool because the interface can be learned in minutes and the basic observation and recording tasks are often picked up intuitively without any extensive training or tech support.



With VALT you can scale to any number of cameras and users all while incurring no per client, confusing ‘pay per feature’ license structures or budget crushing annual maintenance contracts. They have also built in critical data security measures and integrate into your existing user management and authentication systems to efficiently manage multiple departments, programs and ever changing groups of users. Plus, different departments and programs can share hardware while keeping live sessions and video assets securely separate. The system is scalable allowing one camera or hundreds of cameras.

The VALT system can capture content being displayed on virtually any screen (vital sign monitors, software screen, mobile device data) and synchronize it seamlessly with HD video cameras arranged in many different configurations to match changing room configuration or scenarios. To make high volume OSCE prep rounds a breeze, the recordings can even be triggered from the rooms with student id cards or scheduled in advance. VALT also allows supervisors to observe & talk back into simulation rooms from any authorized computer.

They’ve also enabled their clients to literally take video recording into their own hands with our BEAM application. This iOS app can turn an Apple device into a truly mobile AV capture point that can provide unique in-situ perspectives or record simulations out in the field. The same powerful security, data capture and sharing features come along to ensure the video is still easy to manage and secure.

Visit the IVS website to learn more today!