Hibbing Nursing Students Go Beyond Books and Train in New $1M Healthcare Simulation Center

Hibbing Nursing Students Go Beyond the Books, Train in Simulation CenterAnother article showcasing how the media can cover your simulation program! Read our tutorial on how to gather such public attention for your simulation program here!

Nursing students at the Hibbing Community College (HCC) are stepping out of the classroom, into a realistic hospital room setting and learning how to treat patients in life and death situations. The newly remodeled HCC Healthcare Simulation Center opened this semester and is transforming the way students train. The state-of-the art simulation allows the students to go beyond the book and gain real-life experience that comes without the risk of working on real people.

“Students can come in and practice clinical with patients from birth all the way up to death, and they can do it in a safe environment,” explained Sandy Gustafson, nursing program director at HCC. “They can actually do the hands-on care in critical or unusual situations that they wouldn’t get in a facility that’s in a rural area.” The mannequins talk, breath, blink, cough, puke and bleed like a real human would. One of the female robots even gives birth.


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“We can assess them in a way that’s different than just learning from a book because we’re just pretending there,” said Brandy Mass, a first-year nursing student. “If you don’t have that experience behind you with the simulation, then you risk the chance of freezing or not knowing what to do or drawing a blank,” said Ashton Martin, a first-year nursing student. “This prevents us from feeling that nervousness.”


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OSF HealthCare Partners with NIH and AHA to Create Online Medical Journal for 3D Hearts

osf healthcare 3d printed heart library

“Tea. Earl Grey. Hot.”

Soon any type of 3d printed patient heart will be available online thanks to OSF Healthcare and the AHA.

OSF HealthCare and the National Institutes of Health 3D Print Exchange are developing a partnership with the American Heart Association to establish the Jump Simulation-curated 3D Heart Library as an online medical journal where experts specializing in 3D heart modeling can review and validate models submitted by clinicians world-wide. The 3D Heart Library is an open-source digital repository of hearts with congenital defects on the NIH 3D Print Exchange.


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Representatives from the NIH and AHA as well as physicians specializing in 3D modeling from OSF, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, George Washington University School of Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, and the University of Washington recently met in Chicago for a roundtable discussion as part of the effort.

Dr. Matthew Bramlet, Director of the Jump Advanced Imaging and Modeling Program at OSF HealthCare, is working with the AHA-Midwest Affiliate to develop interest in creating accuracy and quality standards for the 3D Heart library, and transition it to a national AHA-backed database. “There are many physicians utilizing 3D modeling for the treatment of congenital heart disease, but there aren’t any best practices for utilizing the technology,” said Dr. Bramlet. “Establishing a peer-review process will drive standardization and increase the quality of 3D digital models around the world.”

Read the full article on the OSF Healthcare Website!

Vet Students Train with Simulators in New Lab at Cornell University

Vet Students Train with Simulators in New Lab at Cornell University

Did you know that the use of high-fidelity simulators is increasing rapidly for veterinary sciences? Check out these recent developments from Cornell University:

The Tetlow and Roy Park Veterinary Innovation Laboratory functions as a classroom and a workshop that will change the way veterinary medicine is taught. The laboratory was built with generous support from the Parks and the Triad Foundation, and is housed in Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM).


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The lab is the brainchild of Daniel Fletcher , a veterinarian and biomedical engineer who teaches and practices emergency and critical care at CVM and Cornell’s Companion Animal Hospital.

Fletcher the engineer was fascinated with the computer-operated human simulators used to train medical students to address symptoms such as rapid heartbeat and labored breathing. Fletcher the educator wondered why there weren’t animal simulators for veterinary students. He purchased a human simulator and began stripping it for parts. The first “smart” pet, a dog, debuted in 2010 . By 2013, Fletcher was heading a simulation center and helping to develop new manikin products!


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Center for Medical Simulation Hosts Alaskan Healthcare Providers for Frontline Training

CMS Hosts Alaskan Healthcare Providers

The opportunity to train for frontline medical cases in rural areas is limitless with simulation. Recently Harvard’s CMS hosted Alaskan healthcare educators to provide a master course in the latest simulation learning best practices:

Recently, Harvard’s Center for Medical Simulation hosted two Alaskan healthcare providers, Susan Davis, EMT, CHP-c, and Danita Koehler, MD. Susan and Danita came to CMS representing Eastern Aleutian Tribes , a healthcare corporation working alongside the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium to provide health services to communities in the Aleutian Islands and on the Alaska and Kenai peninsulas. These programs are part of the Alaska Community Health Aide Program, which provides resources to a network of more than 550 healthcare providers serving more than 170 rural villages throughout Alaska. ANTHC is Alaska’s second largest healthcare employer, with over 2,500 employees.

Susan and Danita attended the CMS Comprehensive Instructor Workshop in order to further their goal of bringing simulation training to these healthcare programs. The Community Health Aides / Practitioners who work in the CHAP program are the primary providers in their communities, working with limited resources to provide health education, prevent disease and injury, and ensure safe water and sewer services. These community providers work in conjunction with remote providers at hospitals, using teleconferencing to examine patients, discuss treatment options, and determine whether medevac resources are required in critical situations.


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Simulation training will allow these frontline providers to safely train on and improve response times to many potential clinical situations, including early recognition of crucial signs and symptoms for issues like shock, sepsis, and psychiatric distress. Having spent a week at CMS training with an international and interprofessional team of healthcare providers, Susan and Danita are now better equipped to create, operate, and evangelize simulation programs for their healthcare organizations and their communities.

Do you train for rural healthcare with simulation? Tweet us @HealthySim and let us know how!

3D Digital Continuity is the Future of Healthcare Education

3-D Digital Continuity Is the Future of Human Health

Sim champions it won’t be long before the entire healthcare industry is surronded by 3D Animation! We already know that designing and testing devices using 3D physical simulation is a key part of developing a commercial product. Slowly we are convincing the world that simulating and testing healthcare providers will become a key part of developing a more effictive healthcare system. Imagine watching in real-time, the human patient’s case as it developed — in 3D on the wall during diagnosis. With faster computers like IBM’s Watson — its only a matter of time! Check out the use of animation from a recent Medical Device Summit:

Steve Levine reports on The Living Heart Project which enables realistic simulation. At a time when the industry is facing some of its toughest challenges, more than 200 regulators, engineers, and healthcare leaders came together in Chicago at the American Medical Device (AMD) Summit in October, to discuss the state of the medical device industry and focus on opportunities to accelerate innovation, with increased predictability and profitability. From a regulatory, patient and payer perspective, medical device business models are changing, creating an environment that has rendered sustainable innovation elusive for many medical device companies seeking to grow their top line as well as bottom line.


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These shifts in the marketplace are pressuring the balancing act between corporate efficiency, time to market, and predictable patient outcomes. It has raised an essential question for the future of the medical device industry—how to restructure to remain competitive and compliant while simultaneously meeting the needs of the patient, provider, and enterprise? The healthcare industry is finding answers in an unlikely place, by turning to a resource traditionally associated with more traditional manufacturing industries such as automotive and aerospace.

You Won’t Believe the Future Tech of Healthcare Education

new tech in healthcare

Chris Merritt, recently wrote an article for McKnights News on the evolution of healthcare education through modern day technologies — which should be forwarded along to simulation discomfiters, or naysayers, in your simulation program! Chris theorizes that online gaming is the future of healthcare education!

The rapid advancements in technology continuously impact our lives on a daily basis and each new week brings a critical update to our attention. This has significantly changed the ways in which we receive and process information such as current events, the daily news, industry updates, association content, medical journals and even our educational materials. You do not need to look any further than a grade-school classroom in which personal tablets have replaced pencil and paper for our youngest generation. This transformation has occurred not because it is the cheapest alternative, in fact this migration can often times be more expensive on the front-end.

We are changing our educational delivery mechanisms due to improved learner experience, retention and overall knowledge outcomes. A 2008 study by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation reported that a great lecture can improve learning outcomes by 17%, while switching to a different delivery mechanism such as serious gaming can improve learning outcomes by 108%.


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Many have acknowledged the explicit need for our healthcare professionals to have a safe environment in which to practice, make mistakes and increase their proficiency in the many critical decisions they make on a daily basis without putting a patient at risk. A 2015 study in The Journal of Clinical Nursing reported in 2015 that, “Finding a new platform to allow all nurses to practice difficult clinical decisions is key. A virtual immersive environment…can provide simulation for nurses to practice making such difficult decisions.”

The evidence is present that these online simulations increase learner engagement and retention while also resulting in improved patient outcomes and a positive impact on healthcare economics. One chronic disease specific online simulation called SiMCare Diabetes has published data which reports: improved glycemic control in patients with A1C >7%, a 60% reduction in the prescription of contraindicated medication and reduced cost by $71 per patient versus those professionals that did not train with the simulation.

Advances in medical education, clinical content, guidelines and standards of care now have a new and improved medium for dissemination. Online training simulations and educational games are continually updated in real-time and given the nature of the platform, content can be rapidly deployed around the globe with the click of a button.

Polhemus Brings Micro Sensor Motion Tracking to Healthcare Simulation

micro sensor motion tracking

Do you believe that one day we will be able to learn from masters simply by copying their hand motions in real-time VR? Polhemus has made this reality one step closer with advanced motion capturing with micro sensors. Are you building a medical simulator? Consider the benefits that Polhemus motion tracking could bring your product:

Developed for a recently released VR cardiac catheterization training simulator, Polhemus’ MicroSensor 1.8 was up to the task of tracking Julian Gray’s amazing finger work. With applications in biomechanics, rehabilitation, virtual reality and more, the MicroSensor 1.8 is extending Polhemus’ leadership in high fidelity motion tracking.


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Hand and finger tracking is achieved in real time, with Polhemus Micro Sensors 1.8. Polhemus motion tracking is high fidelity and robust, tracking the quick fingers of a skilled guitarist. Tiny, lightweight sensors attach easily with custom Micro Mounts. Using our LIBERTY tracking system, the complex finger and hand motions are easily tracked at an update rate of 240 Hz per sensor, with virtually no latency, and using no cameras.

The possibilities for Polhemus motion tracking in medical simulation are clear!

Integrating Research Into Your Healthcare Simulation Program – HealthySimAdmin Video Series Part 4

sim lab management

Last month we publicly launched that the highly praised HealthySimAdmin video series with Part 1: Collaborative simulation program development. Today we continue our ongoing exploration of how to start and expand a healthcare simulation program with Part 4 of HealthySimAdmin: Building Research Programs Into Healthcare Simulation. This 2-hour recording starts with a presentation by Dr. Amar Patel of WakeMed Center for Innovative Learning — which is also the host of SimGHOSTS 2017 USA — and then finishes off with a panel session by a dynamic range of simulation program administrators who provide advice for those integrating research into their simulation programs. Thank to Laerdal, B-Line Medical, and Pocket Nurse these recorded sessions are now available for free to the public!

About Part 3 of HealthySimAdmin:

Medical Simulation is quickly becoming a leading methodology for clinical skills based education
and training. Impacting how our learners understand and apply the content is just as important as expanding our understanding of how to improve human and system processes. Groups interested in developing and funding or expanding current research into simulation will find this session led by Amar Patel MS, REMT-P, CFC extremely useful. Amar will lead our discussion highlighting the successful integration of research at the facility he manages.

Amar shares:

  • Types of research that can be conducted (scopes of projects)
  • Costs associated with conducting and managing research projects
  • Funding opportunities
  • The Return on Investment
  • What you need to know to begin (documents, education, IRB, policies & Procedures)
  • Publishing abstracts and completed research projects
  • Data collection and analysis
  • Setting up the simulation environment (is it research friendly?)

Afterwards our panel engaged in a discussion on how to build and facilitate a successful research component into your simulation program. An audience question and answer period will follow the panel discussion. Through this session we learned how to conduct, integrate, and manage research projects. Furthermore, we will highlight ways to incentivize educators to engage in successful simulation-based research projects that will promote your institution and your program.


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Session Presentation Lead By:

Amar Pravin Patel, MS, NREMT-P, CFC
Director, Center for Innovative Learning
WakeMed Health & Hospitals

Amar Patel is the Director of the Center for Innovative Learning at WakeMed Health & Hospitals. Mr. Patel is responsible for integrating technology-based education to include human patient simulation, healthcare gaming, hybrid education, and intellectual property development at the local, regional, and national level. His passion for changing how human behavior and processes impact healthcare can be seen by his involvement in patient safety and risk management teams. Prior to this position, he served as an Advanced Life Support Program Instructor and the Project Manager of Medical Simulation for the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute at the University of Maryland, College Park. In this role he was responsible for developing new curriculum, as well as integrating medical simulation into all of the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Programs. He was the lead developer of simulation scenarios and technical simulation expert at the local and state level. Mr. Patel has taught numerous instructor courses, including ones offered on an international circuit. He has presented at several conferences, including JEMS EMS Today, the Human Patient Simulation Conference, Laerdal SUN, and the Air Medical Transport Conference.

While educating EMS providers all over the state, Mr. Patel also maintained clinical competency with the Baltimore County Fire Department in Baltimore, Maryland as a national registered paramedic, haz-mat technician and a firefighter. Currently, Amar maintains over 17 certifications to include a HAM radio operator’s license and a certified flight communicator.

Mr. Patel currently serves as the chair of two different committees: the Simulation Steering Committee at WakeMed Health & Hospitals and the Medical Educator’s Transport Section for the Association for Air Medical Services. He is involved in simulation based research projects that focus on integration and implementation of simulation technology across disciplines. He has contributed to numerous simulation articles and travels around the United States providing assistance in simulation center design.

Mr. Patel holds a Bachelors of Arts degree in computer music from Goucher College, a Master’s of Science in Emergency Health Science with a concentration in Education from the University of Maryland Baltimore County, and is currently completing his Doctorate in Health Sciences degree at Nova Southeastern University.

Watch the whole HealthySimAdmin video series now here!

Inova Fairfax Simulation Center Helps Doctors Actually Practice Medicine

Inova Fairfax Helps Doctors Actually Practice Medicine

NBC Washington reports on a new program at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Virginia is giving the term “practicing medicine” a new meaning:

The Inova Center for Advanced Medical Simulation is an effort to keep doctors, nurses and medical students engaged both with the latest in medical techniques as well as some of the more usual challenges in medicine. “It is a laboratory for our physicians and nurses, students, any health care professional to train, whether they’re new or whether they’re a seasoned clinician,” said Director Dr. Craig Cheifitz, who helped develop the center.


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The center has 14 rooms, including an operating room, and state-of-the-art technology. “We do have very high tech mannequins, which have the ability to bleed – artificial blood, of course — voice files, can even change their vitals,” Cheifitz said.

Health care professionals work in teams and deal with everything from infectious diseases to head wounds to complicated births. The exercises are done in real time, and the center is frequently at capacity, Cheifitz said. It’s one of seven medical simulation centers in Virginia.“Medical education for years has been such that after you graduate, you might learn more from a textbook or a conference,” Cheifitz said.

Healthcare IT News Covers Growing Use of Healthcare Simulation Technology

simulation technology in healthcare it

Stephen Burrows, Chair & Program Director of Healthcare Information Systems at Sacred Heart University’s College of Health Professions, once reflected on the growing use of healthcare simulation technology in Healthcare on HealthcareITNews.com. How does your healthcare IT department interact with your simulation program?

With an explosion of technology in simulation, the opportunity to teach healthcare students has almost limitless boundaries.  At the heart of simulation in healthcare is the human patient simulator (HPS). In 1969, Abrahamson, Denson, and Wolf wrote about the ‘Effectiveness of a simulator in training anesthesiology residents’ and the use of patient simulators (Journal of Medical Education) to train physician residents. They felt that simulation held much promise and, from their findings, it would provide “a significant time saving in training” and that “anesthesiology residents might be expected to achieve this level of professional competence in a saving of 22 days over a period of 77 days.”


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Today’s patient simulators are significantly more advanced. Most of them can blink, breathe, cry, sweat, and have a heartbeat and pulse. When hooked up to monitors, they can even display vital signs. With some customization by the faculty the ‘patient’ can exhibit any number of cardiac arrhythmias. The technology can even mimic virtually every major bodily function. Using different scenarios, students can experience a range of events from physical examination to major trauma. The simulator even recognizes injected medications via RFID and responds with appropriate vital signs. This is a particularly helpful (and safe) way to demonstrate a reaction to the wrong medication being given by the student.

Read the Full HealthcareITnews.com Article here!