New Realistic ‘Mikoto’ 3D Printed Medical Simulator Robot Developed in Japan

Realistic 'Mikoto' 3D printed medical training robot developed in Tottori, Japan

Another new healthcare simulation manikin, this time out of Japan, as reported by 3D printer and 3D printing news website 3ders.org, which focuses primarily on endotracheal intubation, gastrointestinal endoscopy, and sputum suctioning. The new device was a collaborative project between Tmsuk R&D Inc., a medical venture firm based in Tottori Prefecture and the Tottori University Hospital in Japan.

Mikoto, which is the Japanese word for “life,” is an extremely lifelike medical simulation robot that was specifically developed to help train young doctors, medical students, and emergency care workers. Not only does the 3D printed robot look and feel real, it is also equipped with special sensors that allow it to give real-time feedback to trainees—in the form of saying “ouch” and gagging. At first glance, it’s easy to mistake the robot for a real boy, as all of its features are uncannily lifelike. Even its interiors are anatomically accurate, as its tongue, esophagus, and windpipe were all based on a patient’s actual organs. In making the simulation robot, the Tmsuk team transformed digital images of the patient’s organs into 3D printed models.

As we’ve seen, the medical sector is turning increasingly towards realistic 3D printed models to train surgeons and simulate medical procedures. In Japan, where most medical learning is still done through textbooks, simulations are also gaining in popularity, as they offer hands-on experience and training, though the simulation models are still relatively limited in their scope. That is, while many medical schools and hospitals are equipped with simulation centers, many of the current training devices and “dolls” are much more rigid than real patients, which creates a discrepancy between what doctors are trained to do and what they actually do when they encounter a real patient.



Dr. Toshiya Nakano, a neurologist at the University of Tottori’s faculty of medicine, added: “Young doctors used to learn the ropes gradually by observing senior doctors at work and then trying their hand at operating on actual patients. Such styles of training are no longer acceptable. Ensuring patient safety is a top concern.”

The new Mikoto robot thus marks a remarkable step forward for medical simulation equipment. Mikoto is not designed for all types of simulations, however, but is built for three main procedures: endotracheal intubation (a process wherein a patient’s airway is forced open by a tube in the windpipe), gastrointestinal endoscopy (where internal organs are checked using a flexible fiber-optic camera tube), and sputum suctioning. As mentioned, Mikoto is equipped with various sensors which can alert users if they are putting too much pressure on the robot, or if they are choking it. At the end of the simulation, the 3D printed robot also issues a score for the simulation, which is based on data obtained through the sensors as well as the length of the procedure.


Sponsored Advertisement:


UW’s CREST Utilizes DOD Grant to Build Modular Manikin Simulator

Fake it ‘til you make it

Looks like there is a new manikin on the horizon from the team at CREST! The Daily UW recently reported about the manikin’s development, which while initially seems to have combat medics in mind, will also have lasting civilian opportunities with the industries first “open source” programming interface.

Named after Frankenstein, the roughly 6-foot manikin is part of an ambitious project by the UW Center for Research in Education and Simulation Technologies (CREST) to create an intelligent, customizable model patient that can fit the needs of any medical scenario. The finished manikin will have interchangeable limbs, an internal computer system, and a network of sensors that monitor how a simulation is progressing in real time. “[Frank] is kind of the logical conclusion,” said CREST director David Hananel. “We’ve been trying to develop these high-tech medical simulators for 25 years, but we haven’t made a lot of progress. It’s really the last three to four years where it’s starting to take off.”

The team won a competitive grant from the Department of Defense (DOD) last September as part of the Advanced Modular Manikin project, securing $7.7 million over the next three years to further develop Frank into a multipurpose training tool. They plan to equip Frank with realistic features like warm skin, a wet tongue, a working system of fluid-filled veins, and a network of sensors that relay information back to the computer core in real time.



Much of the DOD’s interest in medical simulation stems from its goal to improve training procedures for combat medics, but the CREST grant specifies that the manikin platform should have both military and civilian applications. This technology could also allow the U.S. military to end its current practice of using live animals, such as pigs and goats, to train combat medics on invasive procedures.

The U.S. military uses over 8,500 live animals every year for training purposes, according to a house bill filed in February. The DOD wants to move away from animal models but is hesitant to do so until researchers have demonstrated that medical simulations are equally effective training tools, according to Speich. As part of the DOD’s grant, the final manikin platform will be open source, meaning the software and design information will be available for free. While it’s unusual for the DOD to be this transparent with its research, Hananel said that they see the benefits of many companies collaborating on a common platform. “For too long simulation has been silos where everyone is pretty protective of their technology,” Speich said. “The way we’re approaching this from the start is letting everyone know that what we’re creating will be shared with everyone. It’s been a long time coming.”

I’m sure we will see Frank at a SimGHOSTS healthcare simulation technology conference in the near future!

Read the full article on the Daily UW website

‘S3’ Singapore Simulation Conference Now Accepting Presentations for November Event, Supported by SimHealth, SESAM & SimGHOSTS

singapore simulation conference 2017

The S3 Conference brings together thought leaders and cutting-edge ideas from three renowned simulation centers to one place: located in Singapore General Hospital Campus, Singapore. Hosted by the SingHealth Duke-NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS), the S3 Conference 2017 is jointly organized by SIMS, Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine (SESAM) and The Gathering Of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists (SimGHOSTS).

All presentation submissions are due by May 19th!

This international tripartite partnership will provide participating healthcare simulation teams with the best learning and networking opportunities with leading experts worldwide. The S3 Conference aims to be at the pulse of Asia’s simulation industry and to lead the transformation of simulation in the region and beyond. The theme for the S3 Conference this year is, “At the Crossroad of Simulation; Bringing the World together”. Expect transformative sessions with international guest speakers, experience the latest in simulation technology, take in new ideas, share simulation best practices across borders, present ground-breaking simulation studies to fellow industry insiders, receive hands-on training in advanced simulation procedures, and more.

Who Should Attend?



The S3 Conference connects healthcare professionals across disciplines and medical professions in Singapore, the Asia-Pacific region, Europe and the US. The conference will be useful for:

  • Healthcare and simulation technology specialists,
  • Healthcare educators and trainers,
  • Nursing and allied health professionals,
  • Academics and researchers, as well as Local and overseas healthcare leaders.

The main conference takes place from 1 – 3 November 2017, while pre-conference activities will be held on 31 October 2017.

About the Host

The SingHealth Duke-NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS) is Singapore’s largest simulation facility with a comprehensive range of simulation modalities, cutting-edge technology and training programmes. SIMS is committed to delivering quality simulation training by providing a safe and supervised environment for healthcare professionals to sharpen their clinical skills. The institute draws upon the synergy of collective expertise, curriculum and resources in SingHealth. With a rich legacy in clinical education, SIMS aims to be the leading global institution in medical simulation, pushing frontiers in patient safety.

Submit Your Abstracts By May 19th on the SingHealth S3 Website!


Sponsored Advertisement:


Latest Healthcare Simulation News Articles From Around the World!

medical simulation news

Here’s the latest recap of healthcare simulation topics found from the global news stream:

Special Operations Medics Refine Tactical Combat Casualty CareAs a 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) battalion surgeon, Maj. Hunter Winegarner assists in the planning and execution of medical training across the Group. On April 6th, Winegarner led a group of medics through some of the most realistic training Fort Carson has to offer. To help close that gap as much as possible, Group medics use the Medical Simulation Training Center (MSTC) to provide realistic scenarios that they can work through. The MSTC provides training aids that simulate casualties who can bleed from their extremities, have difficulty breathing, and have eyes that are unresponsive to light.



WSU Provides Simulated Training to Enhance Medical Education Program: In August, Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine will debut its medical education program, which leads to a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree. The program will welcome 60 students to its charter class. “By integrating clinical, simulation, and case-based learning experiences, the College prepares graduates to lead health care teams,” says Dr. Ann Poznanski, pathologist and Associate Dean for Curriculum. “They learn to coordinate resources in new ways to improve patient care and the health of their communities.”

El Paso EMT Students Receive Grant for Simulated Ambulance

EPCC EMT Students have New Tool for Simulated Training, Echoing Real-Life Experience

Has your EMS program considered a simulated ambulance? We’ve heard of sponsored vehicles and this awesome classroom simulated environment. My only question is — does it move and vibrate like a real ambulance? The El Paso Herald recently reported on the grant purchase of one such classroom simulator: El Paso Community College (EPCC) Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and Paramedic students have a new tool for “real-life” training.

As part of a $123,000 grant from the Texas Association of Community Colleges– Texas Success Center, EPCC has installed a $40,000 state-of- the-art Ambulance Simulator in its classrooms at the Mission del Paso Campus. “The EMT and Paramedic program is required to train and educate students in a variety of lifesaving treatments and assessment techniques,” said Tony Ayub, Program Coordinator Emergency Medical Services Paramedic. “Simulation has been used successfully in a variety of healthcare related training programs as it allows students to practice and test in a realistic environment.” Practice with “real-life” simulators enriches the student’s training experience.



Accreditation entities recognize and allow the use of medium and high fidelity simulation for clinical training. Paramedic student Kenya Martinez says the simulator training really enhances the program, “I like to help people; I know I can make a difference in their lives.” Ambulance simulators allow the student to practice treatment of critical patients while in transport with all of the restrictions that are associated with working in small, enclosed environments.


Sponsored Advertisement:


University of Nebraska Medical Center Breaks Ground on $119M Davis Global Simulation and Training Center

davis simulation center

What wonderful news for the University of Nebraska healthcare program! On Monday, the University of Nebraska Medical Center held a ceremonial groundbreaking for a planned health care simulation center that will change education of students in the health professions, as well as practicing health professionals in Nebraska. The $118.9 million center, called the Dr. Edwin Davis & Dorothy Balbach Davis Global Center for Advanced Interprofessional Learning — Davis Global Center for short – will transform health care education at UNMC. The center is scheduled to open in September 2018.

As aviation simulation changed the flight industry – health care simulation will propel the training of doctors, nurses and allied health professionals into the next generation with emerging virtual and augmented reality. UNMC’s goal? To provide the highest quality of patient care and safety to improve human performance and effectiveness in health care.

The multi-level Davis Global Center at 42nd and Emile Streets in Omaha will:



  • Result in new and relevant learning methods, including the creation of 3-D/Virtual and Augmented Reality content, clinical and surgical training modules, research and development opportunities, and interprofessional learning.
  • Feature such state-of-the art technology as the iEXCEL Helix – a unique extended 280-degree curved screen creating a 2-D/3-D immersive environment; the first-of-its-kind laser-based 3-D iSpace – a five-sided virtual immersive reality environment; and a 130-seat holographic theater.
  • Form the hub of a statewide network of interconnected simulation centers for the professional development of health care providers across the state.
  • Collaborate with industry to provide new research and development opportunities.
  • Contribute to workforce development and economic growth for Nebraska, creating up to 325 well-paying jobs.
  • Generate an annual economic impact in Nebraska of approximately $40 million (Tripp Umbach study).
  • Offer specialized training opportunities in simulation technology and 3-D/Virtual and Augmented Reality content development.

The nearly 192,000-gross-square-foot center has been developed to help transform health care education from the traditional lecture-based model to embrace more “hands-on” engagement that addresses skills competencies, including teamwork. Studies show that experiential learning yields greater retention than lectures, as well as improves proficiencies. As a result, the traditional “See one, Do one, Teach one,” model will be supplemented with human patient simulators; surgical simulation; and interactive visualization technology such as head-mounted displays; 2-D interactive, touch-screen learning walls; and 3-D and Virtual Immersive Reality (VIR) environments. “Incorporating experiential learning into the curriculum is important,” said UNMC student Cindy Chou, who will graduate in May with her M.D., Ph.D. “Studies have shown that with traditional lectures, there is about a 5 percent retention rate of knowledge, whereas if you have hands-on practice or immediate application, it increases the rate up to 90 percent. So, in that sense, we really need to be doing more active learning and more practicing.”

Learn more about this wonderful new center on the UNMC website!

 

Medical Simulation Programs in the News!

latest healthcare simulation news

Here’s a summary of the latest medical simulation news from around the world sim champs!



  • ‘Baby Tory’: Logan Regional Uses Lifelike Gaumard Infant Simulator to Train for Unique Situations – “Whenever anyone works with Tory, we let them know beforehand that for as long as they’re working with her, she’s real and she’s alive,” registered nurse Kim Hillyard said. “Tory is such a high-fidelity simulation that it’s very easy to feel that this is a real situation, because she’s that lifelike.” According to Logan Regional Hospital RN Coordinator Elizabeth Anderson, only about 1 percent of the approximately 2,600 babies delivered at Logan Regional Hospital each year will need extensive neonatal resuscitation after their arrival. As such, it is uncommon for the nurses of the hospital’s Special Care Nursery to encounter situations in which babies will need complex procedures immediately after their birth. Baby Tory can be programmed to show the same symptoms real infants may encounter in these situations, from abnormal heart rhythms and collapsed lungs to spiking blood pressures and seizures.
  • C-STARS Sets New DoD Training Standard with New Simulator From Air Force News – Athena’s “highly advanced lungs automatically respond to medical ventilation,” said Karen Johnson, the C-STARS simulation coordinator. “Mechanical ventilation is a big part of our training program here at C-STARS St. Louis. We train our students to utilize a ventilator for cases they may encounter when deployed downrange.” Those cases are often explosive injuries seen during operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, wars that presented their own array of medical challenges. The challenges resulted in advanced simulation training that better prepared deployers to respond to significant trauma. The C-STARS providers and nurses behind the training are credentialed and have previously cared for patients injured during operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom.The experience of the cadre, coupled with the addition of Athena, help make the program one of the most advanced offered to military personnel. The supplier of Athena, Canadian Aviation Electronics, said St. Louis C-STARS was the first DOD site in the world to receive this simulation model and the first in the world to receive CAE’s formal training on Athena. When Johnson recognized the potential of Athena, she made it a priority to bring Athena to C-STARS. Until Athena, Johnson said, she never came across a simulator with both anatomically correct female proportions and advanced ventilation functionalities. “The important thing to remember here is the fact that implementing Athena into our program has increased our training capabilities,” Johnson said. “She allows us to present a more hybrid and complete approach to trauma simulation whether our students are first-time deployers or have deployed several times.”
  • Lima Memorial Unveils New Simulator Lab From Lima Ohio News – Lima Memorial staff, Kim LaPoint, center, Janet Bible and Carrie Klosterman, far right, perform life-saving procedures on a high-tech Sim Man 3-G mannequin during a demonstration in the new Innovative Simulation Laboratory at Lima Memorial Health System on Tuesday afternoon. LIMA — Many times, emergency medical care comes down to split-second decisions. Training medical personnel, emergency medical technicians and other first responders in administering that care can often be something of an inexact science, however, with teachers watching trainees work on mannequins and making evaluations based on their observations. After a $100,000 donation from PotashCorp last fall, Lima Memorial Health System has created its own simulation and education laboratory, providing advanced training for both its own health care providers and first responders and health care students in the community.
  • BTC hires new simulation lab assistant From Bolivarmo News – Due to the expansion of the use of its lab facilities, Bolivar Technical College has hired a new simulation lab assistant. Courtney Gott, a current RN program student at BTC, will work in the setup, tear down, repurposing of materials and general maintenance of the simulation and skills labs. According to Simulation and Skills Center coordinator, Lisa Beals, MSN, RN, the labs are in use five days per week now due to an increase in use by students in various medical programs, including the college’s RN, LPN, RN Bridge and Medical Assistant program. “Having to add on personnel in the lab is a great problem to have,” said Beals. “Courtney is going to be a welcome addition to the lab as its use begins to expand.” Gott, a resident of Willard, works as a surgical technician at Mercy Hospital in Springfield in Labor and Delivery. She is expected to graduate from BTC as a registered nurse next year. Although Gott has a wide range of experience in the medical field, she is ready to learn during this opportunity, as well as her current program.

Don’t forget you can learn how to increase media attention to your simulation program through
our comprehensive guide here!

 


Supported Organization:


Simulation Track Featured at Leaping Forward Oncology Lisbon 2017 Conference

leaping forward simulation

Our friend Filipe Costa, Diretor do Centro de Gestão- Oncologia Hospital da Luz in Portugal, recently shared about the simulation track taking place at the 2017 Leaping Forward Clinical Congress May 9th-13th in Lisbon:

Cancer is expected to be the leading cause of death in developed countries, considering the increase in life expectancy. On the other hand, due to better treatment results, the number of cancer survivors is also increasing. From 9 to 13 May 2017, Hospital da Luz will host the Leaping Forward Oncology – International Clinical Congress, taking place in Lisbon, at Centro Cultural de Belém. The event will gather many of the most renowned world experts in the field, to discuss and debate topics in disease-oriented sessions on gastrointestinal, lung, breast, urologic, gynecologic, hematology and central nervous system cancers.

These will be complemented by additional sessions dedicated to more transversal topics, such as Cancer Immunotherapy, Palliative Care, Cardio-Oncology, Diet and Cancer, Nursing in Oncology, and Simulation. A few afternoon sessions dedicated to Robotic Surgery, Interventional Radiology, and Endoscopy will provide hands-on experience. Hospital da Luz network is managed by Luz Saúde, one of the largest private healthcare groups in Portugal. The Leaping Forward Oncology – International Clinical Congress reflects our commitment to excellence and innovation in Medicine. Above all, it will be an ideal forum where participants can share knowledge and experience, concerning the best practice and innovative solutions in the field of Oncology.



SIMULATION IN ONCOLOGY TRACK

02:15 PM Opening & registration
02:30 PM Welcome and introduction Francisca Leite [PT] | Rui Maio [PT]
02:45 PM Innovation in Biomedical education Madalena Patrício [PT]
03:15 PM Educational technology and innovations to training and patient care using simulation Fernando Bello [UK]
03:45 PM Pro-con debate: the impact of simulation on translational patient outcomes Pro: William Mcgaghie [US] TBC Con: Nuno Freitas [PT]
04:15 PM F1 tech in the outside world – How Williams’s pit perfection can improve healthcare teams Gemma Fisher [UK] TBC
04:45 PM Coffee Break 05:15 PM Cancer and the medical simulation center – The MD Anderson´s experience Gregory Botz [US]
05:45 PM Post simulation era in medicine Richard Satava [US]
06:15 PM Closing remarks

Learn more about the Congress on the Leaping Forward Website!

Healthcare Learning Innovations Provides Enhanced Urban Simulation for Public and Community Health Courses

Enhanced Urban Simulation for Public and Community Health Courses

Simulation will continue to expand its educational and training opportunities for healthcare in all disciplines. Healthcare Learning Innovations has announced the planned development of a simulated world for community and public health nursing courses, aptly titled Sentinel World. The first phase of the three-phase project is the urban expansion, Sentinel City 3.0, which will be released April 24, 2017. This phase of development will expand on the company’s already successful Sentinel City Community Health Simulation 2.3, which is currently used by nursing schools across the country. Sentinel City 3.0 will vastly increase the amount of interactive elements and course-based student activity within the simulation, as well as ease the faculty challenge of managing clinical practice hours.



“We’re excited to incorporate new, highly-interactive elements like the Mayor and the home assessment exercise which will allow students to think critically and investigate at their own speed,” says Trevor Rasmusson, the Learning Innovation Manager for Healthcare Learning Innovations. “This type of educational gamification helps increase student engagement and new skill retention,” states Rasmusson.

Healthcare Learning Innovations provides simulation technologies, digital learning tools and interactive courses for healthcare professionals and educators. In partnership with American Sentinel University, it has over 10 years of experience in online, healthcare-focused education.

SimGHOSTS Opens Early-Bird Registration for August Sim Technology Training Event at WakeMed Raleigh

simghosts usa 2017

SimGHOSTS 2017 USA has opened early-bird registration!

Pre-Con Workshops: August 1st, 2017
Main Symposium: August 2nd-4th, 2017
Host: WakeMed Center for Innovative Learning
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina

Early Bird Registration ENDS July 1st!
Early-Bird (April 3rd – July 1st): $473
Standard (July 1st – August 2nd): $597

Join hundreds of Simulation Champions from around the world at our annual international hands-on training events! The “Gathering of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists” which will be operating its seventh year as a US-based non-profit 501(c)3 organization based out of Las Vegas, Nevada.

The 2017 SimGHOSTS events will provide a meeting place for you to exchange ideas and network with technical peers as well as receive specialized training in:

  • Manikin hardware repair and software programming
  • Audiovisual equipment debugging
  • IT networking and infrastructures
  • Moulage makeup
  • Team communication & leadership techniques
  • Medical physiology
  • And much more.

You will also have opportunities to meet with simulation-based vendors to engage with the latest in healthcare education technology.



United States
WakeMed Center for Innovative Learning
Raleigh, North Carolina
Pre-Symposium: August 1st, 2017
Symposium: August 2nd-4th, 2017

Who Should Attend SimGHOSTS Events?

Anyone responsible for the technical operation of a medical simulation lab including full-time or part-time Sim Techs, or clinical educators tasked with operating the day-to-day of simulation spaces. As well, anyone evaluating medical-simulation based technology should strongly consider attending as most major industry vendors are encouraged to attend.

Other meetings are better suited for clinical educators specifically looking to learn how to teach with medical simulation.

Administrators of simulation programs should also consider sending their institution’s AV and IT related staff members who are responsible for supporting the simulation program. In our most recent events, staff from AV and IT departments outside of the healthcare simulation program found immense benefit from participating in SimGHOSTS to better understand the needs of their institution’s simulation program!

SimGHOSTS events provide hands-on training workshops, special pre-symposium courses and podium presentations in:

  • Manikin Programming & Hardware Repair
  • A/V System Design, Integration and Consolidation
  • IT Networking & Debugging
  • Trauma & Suturing Moulage Makeup
  • Video Production & Editing Techniques
  • Team Communication & Leadership
  • Medical Pharmacology for Scenarios
  • Career Development & Staff Management
  • Much much more!

Secure your early-bird pass today to SimGHOSTS 2017 USA!