Hospital Simulations Inspire Student Engineering Innovators at Stanford

Hospital simulations inspire student innovators

The trend to combine bio-engineering departments with or within an institution’s healthcare simulation program is contiuing to grow. All around the world, engineering departments are recognizing the growing opportunities for product development within healthcare through simulated innovations.

Today we share another such story out of Stanford from the School of Medicine website:

In order to invent new medical devices to address problems in health care, the doctors and engineers in Stanford Biodesign ’s year-long fellowship program spend up to six weeks immersed in the hospital or other health-care facilities, watching procedures and asking questions. For undergraduate and graduate students in Biodesign’s introductory classes, firsthand observation is much harder to accomplish because of time constraints and privacy issues.



To solve this problem, Lyn Denend , Biodesign’s director for academic programs, teamed up with emergency room doctor Alexei Wagner , MD, to develop a new approach for an introductory Biodesign Innovation class, which I describe in a recent Stanford News article . Drawing on the resources at the School of Medicine’s Center for Immersive and Simulation-Based Learning , Wagner developed three realistic scenarios around the class’s focus on health care needs related to aging. The scenarios included a chaotic, five-bed ER; a quiet palliative care room where an elderly woman lay dying; and a physical therapy consultation with an older fall victim and his wife.

The goal was to expose students to real problems in health care, an essential part of the Biodesign process for developing medical devices and other technology-based solutions. On the first night of the class, students were randomly assigned roles as patients, caregivers, or observers, and plunged into these scenarios. Each one featured real doctors and nurses, high-tech mannequin patients with voices controlled by simulation staff, standardized patients (actors trained to play specific roles) and, most importantly, real problems in care delivery. As each simulation played out, the students struggled to offer appropriate care and make critical medical decisions against a frustrating backdrop of financial limitations, overburdened providers and conflicting family wishes.


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Society for ‘Simulation In Healthcare’ Journal Volume 12 Released

simulation in healthcare journal
Just a brief update today to share that the latest Simulation in Healthcare journal edition Volume 12 – April 2017 – Issue 2 pp: 67-134 from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare has come out with these important articles:
  • Evaluation of a Simpler Tool to Assess Nontechnical Skills During Simulated Critical Events Watkins, Scott C.; Roberts, David A.; Boulet, John R.; McEvoy, Matthew D.; Weinger, Matthew B.
  • Cricothyroidotomy In Situ Simulation Curriculum (CRIC Study): Training Residents for Rare Procedures Petrosoniak, Andrew; Ryzynski, Agnes; Lebovic, Gerald; Woolfrey, Karen
  • The Effect of Force Feedback in a Virtual Learning Environment on the Performance and Satisfaction of Dental Students de Boer, Ilse R.; Lagerweij, Maxim D.; de Vries, Merlijn W.; Wesselink, Paul R.; Vervoorn, Johanna M.
  • Design and Validation of a Three-Dimensional Printed Flexible Canine Otoscopy Teaching Model Nibblett, Belle Marie D.; Pereira, Mary Mauldin; Sithole, Fortune; Orchard, Paul A.D.; Bauman, Eric B.
  • Developing Team Cognition: A Role for Simulation Fernandez, Rosemarie; Shah, Sachita; Rosenman, Elizabeth D.; Kozlowski, Steve W. J.; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Grand, James A.
  • The Effectiveness of Medical Simulation in Teaching Medical Students Critical Care Medicine: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Beal, Matthew David; Kinnear, John; Anderson, Caroline Rachael; Martin, Thomas David; Wamboldt, Rachel; Hooper, Lee Beyond Fidelity: Deconstructing the Seductive Simplicity of Fidelity in Simulator-Based Education in the Health Care Professions Schoenherr, Jordan Richard; Hamstra, Stanley J.
  • Developing a Conversational Virtual Standardized Patient to Enable Students to Practice History-Taking Skills Maicher, Kellen; Danforth, Douglas; Price, Alan; Zimmerman, Laura; Wilcox, Bruce; Liston, Beth; Cronau, Holly; Belknap, Laurie; Ledford, Cynthia; Way, David; Post, Doug; Macerollo, Allison; Rizer, Milisa
  • National Clinical Skills Competition for Medical Students in China Liu, Jing; Jiang, Guanchao; Zhou, Qinghuan; Chen, Hong; Wang, Shan; Wang, Qiming; Chi, Baorong; He, Qingnan; Xiao, Haipeng

Cedars-Sinai Women’s Guild Sim Center Now Offers ALERT Training for Life-Threatening Event Recognition & Treatment

alert training at cedars sinai simulation center

Simulation Center Manager for the Women’s Guild Simulation Center for Advanced Clinical Skills at Cedars Sinai Medical Center Russell Metcalfe-Smith has shared the powerful news that the center is offering ALERT certified training!

ALERT stands for ‘Acute Life-Threatening Events Recognition and Treatment’

Originally developed in 1999 by Professor Gary Smith and colleagues at Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, ALERT is a multi-professional course to train staff in recognizing patient deterioration and act appropriately in treating the acutely unwell. The course is usually delivered as a one-day interactive seminar built around practical patient-based scenarios. The day is supported by a comprehensive reference manual and slide presentation. ALERT uses a structured and prioritized system of patient assessment and management to enable a pre-emptive approach to critical illness. It instructs staff in the recognition of impending clinical deterioration, the management of disordered physiology and other aspects of the delivery of acute care. Cedars-Sinai Women’s Guild Simulation Center is the western hub for the United States. We are working to support other institutions develop this program in their facilities.



ALERT course objectives:

  • To teach healthcare professionals a structured and systematic approach to the assessment and management of patients.
  • By using a structured and systematic approach deteriorating patients will be identified earlier and care will be escalated to others when appropriate. This approach can reduce avoidable in-hospital deaths and cardiac arrests.
  • To teach healthcare professionals that involving expert senior help early, such as Critical Care, will enable appropriate and timely intensive care unit admissions.
  • To introduce tools to healthcare professionals which will improve team working and communication.

The ALERT course incorporates:

  • A comprehensive reference manual which the candidates receive pre-course.
  • Interactive presentations which are adapted to meet local policies and procedures.
  • Practical demonstrations.
  • Role-play of clinical patient based scenarios during which the candidates are encouraged to reflect on their actions and to consider What would I do next?
  • A blended, flexible, learning approach.
  • A proven track record of delivery of more than 10 years.
  • A multi-professional candidate applicability.
  • A candidate course certificate that is recognized by deanery’s, acute trusts and professional bodies in the UK and abroad.
  • A straightforward program to organize and deliver with minimal equipment required.

The ALERT course benefits to patients, their relatives and hospital staff with:

  • Improvements in the general ward care of patients.
  • A reduced number of cardiac arrest calls on general wards.
  • Earlier, and more appropriate referrals to the intensive care unit.
  • Fewer re-admissions to the intensive care unit.
  • Fewer avoidable in-hospital deaths.
  • Improved decision-making regarding the resuscitation status of patients.
  • Improved multi-professional teamwork.
  • Improved communication.
  • Fewer complaints from patients or their relatives.

Learn more about the ALERT course at Cedar-Sinai Women’s Guild Simulation Center!


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Jump Simulation & Education Center Explores Value ROI of Healthcare Simulation

Applying the Phillips ROI Process

Jump Simulation has established an ROI Committee made up of representatives from Performance Improvement, Healthcare Analytics, Business Development, Finance and Nursing and Clinical Education. They have the task of placing value on our highest rated educational programs using the Phillips model which evaluates projects in five levels: Reaction, Learning, Application, Impact and ROI. We used the Phillips model to measure the value of our Central Venous Catheter (CVC) program. The project looked to determine whether simulated central line training could lower rates of complications that are common with this procedure and lower health care costs.

The first level, Reaction, gauges whether learners find certain simulations relevant to their work and whether they intend to utilize what they’ve experienced in their practice. In a post event survey, learners in the CVC program provided positive feedback on the usefulness of this particular simulation.

The next level of the Phillips model, Learning, determines if simulation participants gained knowledge, skills and confidence from their experience. This means learners should be able to demonstrate new procedures in a simulated environment. As part of the data collected for the CVC study, direct observation of learners showed they performed simulated central line insertions correctly. A self-efficacy survey also showed improved confidence among those who participated in the simulation.   



Application is the third level of evaluation in the ROI process. We want learners to not only demonstrate they can perform a certain task within a simulated environment; we also want to ensure those who participate in simulation apply that knowledge in the clinical space. A chart review of CVC simulation participants showed an increased percentage of successful line placements for patients within the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) of OSF Saint Francis Medical Center.

The next question we want answered is whether simulation training has a measurable Impact on performance. Data is collected for this fourth level of the model by determining whether the simulation has helped OSF meet a strategic goal such as improved patient outcomes or increasing employee satisfaction. Chart review and billing and coding analysis of CVC simulation learners found that improved outcomes led to patients being able to go home sooner—by a little more than two days.

To learn about the fifth level of ROI, read the full article on the Jump website today!

 

Operative Experience Expands Portfolio of Realistic Surgical and Team Training Simulators | IMSH 2017 Video Interview with CEO

realistic skin surgical simulator

At IMSH 2017, HealthySimulation.com had the opportunity to interview Mick Navin, CEO of Operative Experience Inc (OEI) about their expanded range of hyper-realistic surgical simulators with engaging anatomy, as well as to learn about the recent investments and support by Lou Oberndorf — who lead the growth of METI which was acquired by CAE Healthcare. Mick shared that OEI is on a mission to revolutionize surgical and medical team training using medical simulators with unprecedented anatomical and surgical fidelity within a rigorous experiential instructional paradigm. HealthySim provided a video interview about OEI during the 2012 IMSH event, suggesting it would only be a matter of time before the technology was expanded by investment support — and we are glad to see it was by one of our industries commercial pioneers!



OEI provides a range of simulation-based systems for surgery and pre-hospital training:

  • Fetal Extraction Simulator
  • Postpartum Hemorrhage Control Trainer
  • Emergency Hysterectomy Trainer
  • Emergency C-Section Delivery Simulator
  • C-Section Skills Trainer
  • Emergency Thoracotomy
  • Craniotomy
  • Fasciotomy
  • Disaster Legs
  • Surgical Legs
  • Various Tactical Casualty Care Simulator

HealthySim also spent some time learning from Mick about how the company has grown since our 2012 interview, following years of prototype development and testing, collaboration with materials expert Jeffrey Ellis led to the creation of the world’s first physical simulators upon which major surgical hands-in-the-body operations could be performed using standard surgical instruments. A series of SBIR grants from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command capitalized the company and enabled Operative Experience Inc. to advance its product development.  OEI products offer a different type of simulator, providing unique surgical experiences that mimic combat or other trauma based emergencies with realistic anatomical feeling.

Learn more at the OEI website!


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KbPort’s simCabRx Provides Realistic Medical Cart Simulated Training | IMSH 2017 Video Interview

med cart simulator from kbport

During the recent IMSH 2017, HealthySimulation.com learned more about the simCabRx med card simulator from Kbport which was located at the Pocket Nurse booth. KbPort’s Simplicity solution combines medication dispensation with the power of SimLabConnect and SimEMR to provide a more complete, more realistic simulation experience. The integration of medical simulation devices provides a critical context for the data generated, in the form of patient history and patient records, which form the foundation for support for future treatment. Improve bedside medication administration education with KbPort SimCartRx mobile medication cart solutions — which you can see in our video interview below!

SimCartRx works as part of the KbPort simplicity Solutions System!

Both SimCartRx, Kbport’s mobile medication dispensing solution, and SimCabRx their decentralized medication dispensing solution, integrate with SimEMR, allowing students to access patient records during simulations, which is a critical component of real patient care. The temporal capability of Simplicity, with SimLabConnect and SimEMR, adds an invaluable, true-to-life dimension to your simulation-based training, advancing your program’s effectiveness while promoting proper communication and patient safety.

Begin simulations with SimEMR for realistic med cart learning experiences:



  • Log in/out with student cart credentials (LDAP compatible)
  • Patient record lookup via barcode scan
  • Medication scanning

Control medication dispensation through SimEMR and view cart/cabinet events within SimEMR & ETC FusionHD

  • Log in/out
  • Patient lookup via barcode scan
  • Drawer open/close
  • Medication scanning
  • Administer via bedside with SimCartRx

Log simulator vitals into SimEMR patient record in real time

• Creates an accurate, complete and evolving patient history
• Improves critical thinking by presenting and integrating comprehensive patient data

Certainly those programs looking to integrate EMR, medcart, and patient charting into one system across the learning program should check out KbPort’s simplicity systems!

Learn more on the Kbport website today!

DiaMedical USA Partners with SimUSuit to Offer Bariatric Patient Simulation | IMSH Video Interview

obesity healthcare simulation suit

During IMSH 2017 HealthySim.com was on hand to learn more about the Bariatric trainers created by Sim-U-Suit and distributed by DiaMedical.

The Adult Full Body Sim-U-Suit was created to enhance simulations for the future generation of doctors and nurses to properly prepare for the bariatric patient! The Full Body Sim U Suit is the ONLY full body obesity suit that including both arms and legs in one piece! This revolutionary simulation product can fit almost any manikin or can be worn by a standardized patient! Multiple access holes are implanted throughout the suit for simple IV, peri care, enema and catheterization simulations. With the growing bariatric patient population in the US, the Sim U Suit is an absolute necessity for every simulation lab.



SIM-U-SUIT obesity suits let your program simulate true-to-life size, look, and weight of bariatric patients. Their suits can be worn by real people, or used on manikins and human patient simulators. You can make the suit as heavy or light as your scenario dictates. The Sim-U-Suit products enable your simulation program to teach safe/proper care for the growing number of overweight patients in the healthcare system today.

Obesity training systems are also available as:

  • Adult Edema Simulation Leg Sleeves
  • Adult Edema Simulation Arm Sleeves
  • Pediatric Obesity Suit

Learn more about the Obesity Suit on the DiaMedical Website today!


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ECS Leads the Way with VR Training for Healthcare Simulation | IMSH 2017 Video Interview

ecs clinical skills medical simulation

Rounding out HealthySim’s interviews from the IMSH 2017 trade show floor, today we are taking a look at the VR learning system “Clinical Skills” from Engineering & Computer Simulations (ECS). Clinical Skills training application provides medical professionals the ability to easily access scenario-based learning and practice their clinical skills within a clinical environment. Watch the video below to see it in action through the HTC Vive:



The Clinical Skills Mobile App uses a variety of conversation-based scenarios in a deep learning environment, which prompts learners to use specific approaches while conducting patient interviews. The mobile app includes essential environmental cues, such as patient feedback, as well as instructional feedback. The user is evaluated at each step of the clinical exam and cannot progress until the correct action is performed.

Benefits to medical professionals:

  • Interact with medical inventory items to take vital signs and perform physical examinations on realistic patient avatars
  • Proper sequencing of events
  • Reinforces patient interview techniques
  • Incorporates productive patient dialogue
  • Helps hone diagnostic reasoning skills that can be applied to a number of situations — both in regular checkups and even in more severe cases, where extreme sensitivity is required

Learn more about Clinical Skills on the ECS Website today!

OSSimTech Demonstrates Hybrid Learning of 3D and Haptics Surgical Simulation with Sim-Ortho | IMSH 2017 Video Interview

open knee surgical simulator

Continuing HealthySim’s coverage of the IMSH 2017 Exhibit Tradeshow floor, today we are sharing our video interview with OSSimTech, who provide the Sim-Ortho, a virtual reality training simulator to teach and train orthopedic open-surgery. As the world’s first of its kind, the Sim-Ortho simulator offers unique possibilities to expand medical education of orthopedic surgery. Getting to test the simulator was an amazing experience as the real-time haptics push back from the hardware felt very realistic — and matched the 3D animations exactly.

The Sim-Ortho enables simulation training of complex orthopedic procedures in knee and spine surgery as well as trauma surgery. Situated in a highly realistic 3D environment with detailed imaging, the trainee practices “hands-on” in a risk-free environment. The Sim-Ortho training simulator offers haptic feed-back (applied force and resistance) and allows handling and manipulation of multiple orthopedic tools. The Sim-Ortho training simulator is leading the path in high-fidelity simulation. The company has a highly skilled multi-disciplinary team comprising engineers, doctors, programmers, developers, industrial designers as well as management professionals.

The Sim-Ortho open platform allows for these modules:

  • Knee
    • Left, right and lighter cases of total knee replacement
    • Fibial and tibial osteotomies (Open and closed wedges)
    • Tibial tubercule osteotomy
    • Unicompartmental knee replacements (Lateral, medial and patellofemoral)
  • Spine
    • Realistic use of rongeurs, pedical probe, screwdriver, bone nibbler and kerrison
    • 30 cases of spinal fusion
    • 30 cases of discectomy
    • 30 cases of laminectomy
  • Tool Handling
    • User-friendly tutorial to the Sim-Ortho
    • 15+ cases of hands-on training
    • Several tools in several environments

Recently the company posted a blog article by Dr. Niranjan Sathivel on The Power of Teamwork & Sim Efficiency:



Multidisciplinary team simulations have several benefits for the parties involved; learners, educators and the simulation centre staff. In these scenarios learners have the unique opportunity to tackle problems using a team approach, which in many ways mimic real life settings. Communicating, learning and understanding the perspective of each team member is a vital aspect for patient safety, which can be built into training scenarios.

I understand that it’s challenging for educators to collaborate and integrate goals and objectives for their individual teams, in-order to create simulation scenarios for team training. By making this happen they are able to add a whole new domain which could enhance the simulation education experience for learners. There are three benefits to the simulation centre and the staff: The first being the optimum use of the centre’s space and equipment. From my experience in the industry, I have observed that in many simulation centres, the training equipment often remain under-utilized. Bringing a multidisciplinary team for training, into one simulation theatre, sometimes provides the context for putting such equipment to use, by hybridizing simulation platforms. At this point you probably might have guessed the other two benefits. There is a positive impact on staff work flow efficiency and operational costs. Running the sessions in one simulation theatre as opposed to multiple simulation theatres can save you money and time. Read the full article here.

Custom Simulators!

Is your program looking for custom simulator solutions? OSSimTech allows you to differentiate your organization with a customized OSSimTech virtual reality training simulators– featuring your own procedures and surgical devices. As the world’s first of its kind, OSSimTech simulators offer unique possibilities to expand medical education, market your products and train your employees.

Learn more about the Ortho-Sim on the OSSimTech website today!

HybridLab Provides Distance and eLearning Solutions for Medical Simulation | IMSH 2017 Interview

hybridlab

At IMSH 2017 HealthySim interviewed the team from HybridLab to learn more about their learning platform, designed to “overcome issues when teaching resources are limited by enabling access for medical training and simulation to almost any location around the World”.



Hybrid Training was created “To Make the Learning World Better” by creating better training solutions, that are easier to access and more convenient to provide. HybridLab training and simulation does not need the direct participation of instructor and can be set up at any preferred location. Students prepare using pre made e-learning systems before coming to HybridLab. At the location, they get orders and instructions of what and how to do using our specifically designed algorithms with any training equipment. Instructor monitors and evaluates students’ performance from distance at any time while students train in HybridLab classroom.

HybridLab can enable any simulation center to run 24/7 by helping to create a completely autonomous training environment, simulation experiences without supervision, and distance monitoring. High-Impact Hybrid models include:

  • E-learning
  • Hands on simulation
  • Peer to peer teaching
  • Based on success learning algorithms
  • Automatically Personalized learning

Learn more on the HybridLab Website today!