137 Free Clinical Simulation Scenarios From Health Education England Thames Valley

free medical simulation scenarios

Check out over 135 free medical simulation scenarios from Health Education England – Thames Valley! Covering a wide range of disciplines, these free healthcare simulation scenarios provides pdf’s with background information, patient charts, case flow charts, debriefing points, feedback forms, and more.

About the Free Scenario Library

Health Education England – Thames Valley (HEE TV) is committed to providing high-quality educational resources for our clinicians. Simulation training is recognized as an extremely useful teaching method and has become commonplace in many specialties. HEE TV has developed a ‘Clinical Simulation Scenarios’ library, comprising 137 detailed scenarios, split into eight categories:



  • Anesthetics
  • Core Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Foundation
  • General Practice
  • Pediatrics
  • Psychiatry
  • Emergency Medicine

Scenarios include links to areas of the relevant curriculum and provide clear instructions for faculty and ‘in-scenario personnel’ to follow. Scenarios have been designed in order to focus on aspects of clinical care that are often challenging for clinicians, for example, difficult conversations, clinical emergencies and technical skills.

HEE TV encourages collaboration with other interested bodies, and permits copying, distribution and derivation of content within the ‘Clinical Simulation Scenarios’ library in accordance with Creative Commons ‘Attribution-Noncommercial-Sharealike 3.0’ license.

Visit the HEE TV website to download all the clinical simulation scenarios for free! 

Click here for even more free medical simulation scenarios from HealthySim!


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Royal College of Emergency Medicine Provides Safety Toolkit Including Simulation Resource Links

royal college patient safety toolkit healthcare simulation

Published in 2013 this Royal College of Emergency Medicine toolkit, prepared by the Safer Care Committee, is a useful starting point in providing the quality of patient care through the lens of patient safety which includes sections of the utilization of simulation.

What is the Toolkit?

This safety tool kit aims to describe the structures, processes and skills required for a ‘safe’ department. The original concept was that it would enable any Emergency Physician, starting from scratch, to construct a safety framework that contained all the key elements necessary to support the delivery of high quality care whilst at the same time being vigilant to ongoing risks. We acknowledge that in reality the majority of Emergency Departments will already have well established structures for ensuring safe care but it is also probable that not all elements are as effective as they should be; so we hope this toolkit will provide something useful for all.



Ruth Brown explains how to use the safety toolkit

This toolkit is provided to Fellows as a comprehensive (but not exhaustive) resource for delivering safe care. We know many departments already have really good systems in place, whilst others are still developing them. It is also provided as a resource for senior trainees in thinking about their future role as a consultant. We suggest you could use this resource in a number of different ways:

  1. In your local departmental meetings – Ensuring that safety is considered in the meeting or by having specific safety meetings. We have included suggested agendas for such meetings in our toolkit section Departmental Activity Resources.’
  2. Working through the toolkit – You could take a section at a time, say over a year, and review the resources as a team, perhaps as a consultant CPD session or by asking an StR to present a summary. This embeds the content in everyone’s psyche and lends an importance to it.
  3. By discussing key topics with your managers and ensuring that all business plans and service developments are prepared using the toolkit as a resource for your document.
  4. Modeling your in –house education using the resources or accessing your Trust quality and safety team to deliver the education with you – they can add a dimension to the clinical content by talking about real cases from a risk perspective.
  5. One of the key chapters is Supporting the Second Victim. This is a relatively new concept and is particularly welcomed by staff. This might be the first section of the toolkit you review together as it will engage staff very early on.

Read the full resource with links here

IMSH 2017 Opens in Orlando to 2,700 Attendees From 51 Countries

imsh 2017

Today in Orlando Florida, 2,700 simulation champions from over 50 countries came together for the International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare. The event started with Stories from the Heart, a collection of shared stories from simulation champions about their experiences with healthcare simulation. The International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare (IMSH 2017) is the most important healthcare simulation conference of the year. One in which you will experience complete immersion in situations that may result in lives being improved and saved. Dr. Christine Park, President of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare, and Dr. Chad Epps, Past-President of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare — helped open the show.

About the Stories from the Heart:

Many of us have taken part in a healthcare simulation exercise and know the feeling of confidence it can bring. We understand that the knowledge gained can lead directly to improved patient safety, a change in our life, or even save a patient’s life. This is an incredible concept and many of us have a tale to tell. Come join us during our Opening Plenary Session to hear the powerful stories of how simulation has helped save a life! You can read many more Stories from the Heart here.

Mary Holtschneider RN-BC, told the story of a friend, a simulation champion herself who fell unconscious next to the hospital and was found by colleagues and rushed to the hospital that she was going to teach simulation at that day. Thankfully, the interventions that the team had learned from her simulated practice sessions were put into practice, and miraculously she survived even with more than 60 minutes of unconsciousness. Turns out — Mary was her friend in the story!

david gaba



Dr. David Gaba was honored with the Pioneer in Simulation award for his lifetime of work in shaping the industry “for his ingenuity talent and wisdom in leading the creation of modern day simulators and advancing the field as the founding editor of the journal for simulation in healthcare. Dr. Gaba received a standing ovation from the general audience!”

About Dr. Gaba

David Gaba, MD is Associate Dean for Immersive and Simulation-based Learning and Director of the Center for Immersive and Simulation based Learning (CISL) at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is Professor of Anesthesia (with tenure) at Stanford and Director of the Patient Simulation Center of Innovation at Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System where he is also a Staff Anesthesiologist. Over the last 25 years Dr. Gaba’s laboratory has worked extensively on human performance and patient safety issues. This laboratory is a pioneer in applying organizational safety theory to health care.

The laboratory is also the inventor of the modern full-body patient simulator and is responsible for introducing Crew Resource Management training from aviation to healthcare, first in anesthesia and then to many other healthcare domains. He has been the principal investigator on grants from a wide variety of funders. Dr. Gaba is an author on more than 100 original articles in a wide diversity of peer-reviewed journals. He is the author of 18 book chapters, and the well-known book Crisis Management in Anesthesiology. After serving on the editorial boards of several high profile academic and medical journals, Dr. Gaba was the founding Editor-in-Chief of the indexed peer-reviewed journal Simulation in Healthcare, the official journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH).

Follow the story with #IMSH2017 and on @HealthySim


Supported Organization:


Apoyando las Transiciones en las Trayectorias de la Carrera Medica: El Papel de la Educación Basada en Simulación

advances in simulation journal

We thank Alfred de Jesús Toledo de Lima Director del Centro de Simulación COSMOS en Universidad Nacional Pedro Henríquez Ureña for this Spanish translation of Supporting Transitions in Medical Career Pathways – The Role of Simulation Based Education! Please comment and email us your appreciation of this Spanish article — and we will continue to produce more translations in the future!

Apoyando las Transiciones en las Trayectorias de la Carrera Medica: El Papel de la Educación Basada en Simulación

¿Aun no ha revisado la revista Advances in Simulation Journal? ¡Grandes noticias! es gratis para todos en línea gracias a la gente en SESAM. Acabo de revisar “Apoyando las Transiciones en las Trayectorias de la Carrera Medica: El Papel de la Educación Basada en Simulación” por Jennifer Cleland y otros, ¡y nos pareció muy útil para que todos nosotros lo consideremos!

Acerca de Advances in Simulation Journal

Advances in Simulation proporciona un foro para compartir la práctica académica con el objetivo de avanzar en el uso de la simulación en el contexto de la atención médica y social. Advances in Simulation publica artículos que abarcan todas las disciplinas científicas y de las ciencias sociales, todas las profesiones de atención médica y social, así como estudios multi e interprofesionales. La revista incluye artículos relacionados con la simulación que incluyen el estudio de la práctica de la atención médica, factores humanos, psicología, sociología, antropología, comunicación, trabajo en equipo, rendimiento humano, educación, tecnología de aprendizaje, economía, ingeniería biomédica, computación científica, modelado de simulación, estudios de población, teatro, artesanía, evaluación de programas y más.



Abstracto

Las transiciones o períodos de cambio en las trayectorias de la carrera médica pueden ser episodios difíciles que requieren que el profesional clínico en transición asuma nuevos roles y responsabilidades, se adapte a las nuevas dinámicas culturales, cambie los patrones de conducta y que maneje exitosamente la incertidumbre. Estos períodos de aprendizaje intensivo presentan riesgos para la seguridad del paciente. La educación basada en la simulación es un enfoque pedagógico que permite a los profesionales clínicos practicar sus habilidades técnicas y no técnicas en un ambiente seguro y de este modo aumentar su preparación para la práctica. En este comentario, presentamos los potenciales usos, fortalezas y limitaciones de la educación basada en simulación para apoyar las transiciones en las trayectorias de la carrera médica, discutiendo la utilidad educativa, evaluación de resultados y procesos, y el costo y el valor e introduciendo una nueva perspectiva al considerar las ventajas de la Educación Basada en Simulación. Proporcionamos ejemplos de casos de estudio en los que se aplica la Simulación Basada en Educación para ilustrar estos puntos y estimular la discusión.

Conclusiones

Incrementar la preparación de los docotores para llevar a cabo las técnicas y comportamientos requeridos para asi cumplir con las responsabilidades de cualquier nuevo papel que desempeñan es importante para la seguridad del paciente, la eficiencia del servicio y el bienestar psicológico individual. Mientras que el verdadero dominio de un rol no puede lograrse hasta que uno se sumerja en el mismo lugar de trabajo[6], la literatura indica que podemos avanzar algún trecho con la preparación de los individuos para los elementos técnicos y no técnicos de cualquier nuevo rol, y de hecho los retos psicológicos asociados, a través del uso juicioso e imaginativo de la Educación Basada en Simulación. En este trabajo, hemos proporcionado una visión general de algunos de los factores clave asociados con planificar y evaluar la Educación Basada en Simulación para transiciones.

También hemos destacado una serie de áreas para investigación futura en la Educación Basada en Simulación para dar apoyo a las transiciones de la carrera médica. Estas incluyen el desarrollo de la comprensión en torno a los factores prácticos que deben ser considerados al diseñar Educación Basada en Simulación, que van desde entregar retroalimentación y la incorporación de medidas de resultado a largo plazo hasta el análisis de la costo-efectividad del enfoque que está llevandose a cabo, así como las influencias socio-culturales sobre el aprendizaje en entornos simulados. Instamos a los que trabajan en la investigación de la Educación Basada en Simulación a considerar la mejor manera de identificar y evaluar los resultados concretos específicos para este propósito. Sigue existiendo la necesidad de una mayor investigación sobre el uso de la Educación Basada en Simulación para apoyar la transición de estudiante de medicina a médico residente, pero instamos a los que trabajan en esta área a que no dejen de examinar el uso de la Educación Basada en Simulación para apoyar posteriores transiciones de la carrera médica donde “los alumnos” están trabajando con menos supervisión y una responsabilidad cada vez mayor, aún cuando se mantengan aparentes problemas (en gran media no técnicos) pertinentes a la seguridad del paciente.

Lea el artículo completo en Advances in Simulation Journal

IMSH 2017 Must Sees and Big Announcements

imsh 2017

Hello Sim champs! Excited to see many of you this weekend at #IMSH2017 in Orlando — where lots of great networking, product launches, and educational courses will be taking place! If you are attending, please be sure to stop by and say hi to HealthySimulation.com’s founder Lance Baily at the SimGHOSTS booth #825. Email me if you would like to setup a time to connect!

Here are some sneak peak announcements of must see items for IMSH we have already heard about from the community:

imsh 2017

Stories From the Heart Opening Keynote: Many of us have taken part in a healthcare simulation exercise and know the feeling of confidence it can bring. We understand that the knowledge gained can lead directly to improved patient safety, a change in our life, or even save a patient’s life. This is an incredible concept and many of us have a tale to tell. Come join us during our Opening Plenary Session to hear the powerful stories of how simulation has helped save a life! Discover how simulation can impact a medical professional’s career. Explore the ways that simulation has saved a patient’s life. Become reenergized in your practice by hearing how simulation positively impacts the work we do everyday!

simghosts sim training

SimGHOSTS launches online course development profit share opportunity & Raffles Off Oculus Rift! Interested in creating an online course to help others learn key aspects of healthcare simulation technology and operations? More interested in earning a share of the revenue earned from developing such a course as it sells to their international audience of simulation champions? Stop by their booth #825 to learn more about the types of course content they are seeking and how you can win an Oculus Rift DK2! They are also having their annual “Pub Crawl” Sunday night starting with the “Pub” right near the convention center at 9PM!

cardionics new products

Cardionics launches new products! Imagine a shirt you or your low-fidelity manikin could wear, that would enable your learners to auscultate actual pathological breathing and body sounds! Attend their launch presentation with Dr. Bill Boudreaux from the University of Texas Medical Branch, School of Medicine. Date: Monday, Jan 30th Time: 3 pm – 3:30 pm Location: Rainbow Springs Room 1 & 2 (conveniently located across the lobby from the exhibit hall) to learn more about the SimShirt, SAM Gen III, and more!



operative-experience-surgical-simulation

Operative Experience Launches First Major BoothLou Oberndorf, the man behind METI, is now helping Operative Experience grow their realistic surgical trainer product lines with some big new product announcements coming this week. We had a chance to see this technology a few years back during the military demonstration at IMSH, but with Lou connected to the project be sure to keep your eye out for Operative Experience.

preemie simulator

SIMCharacters’ North American Debut of Paul — World’s First High Emotion Preterm Simulator at simAlliance Booth – Very excited about this one readers! Come to the collaborative simAlliance booth #325 featuring Paul, the most advanced preterm infant simulation our industry has seen. Paul enables highly realistic critical care training in neonatology for improved learning and patient safety outcomes. He is a preterm simulator for neonates born at 27 weeks with realistic internal and external anatomy including 3D printed larynx which demonstrates authentic pathologies specific to preterm babies with physiological and pathological breathing patterns including RDS, BPD, cyanosis, and hyperoxia. Come see Paul and also learn more about SIMStation’s AV recording and debriefing systems, SimCore’s simulation center management tool, and the AV systems design and installation services of Level 3 Healthcare!

sim-learningspace-h1

CAE Healthcare Showcasing New LearningSpace Features to Current Customers! Monday Jan. 30th at 7:15-8:15AM in Discovery 45, CAE Healthcare team members will showcase sneak peaks to the latest features to their awesome LearningSpace system. If you are a new customer you can learn more about LearningSpace here or by visiting their booth #600 — the biggest booth this year! I also hear they will be showcasing some new VR technologies which I can’t wait to learn more about!

Got a hot tip on something else launching at IMSH 2017? Email us and let us know and we’ll add it here!

As always, stay tuned to @HealthySim for great tweets covering the show!

News Agency Covers the Leadership Behind the Healthcare Simulation Success Story

J. Cedar Wang, MSN, RN, GNP-BC, CHSE

NorthJersey.com recently did a profile of  J. Cedar Wang, director of simulation education at Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck. HealthySim really appreciates that this news agency did a piece sharing the professional career of a healthcare simulation champion — which helps to get the word out about the progress and power of simulation to the general community! Usually such news articles focus on the center and the equipment of simulation — so we thought this was a different and much needed angle on the people who make healthcare simulation work!

NorthJersey Excerpt:

J. Cedar Wang oversees the only hospital-based health care simulation training center in north Jersey. The Institute for Simulation Learning “seeks to train anyone along the continuum of care, including physicians, nurses, social workers, first responders, even the front desk staff,” she says. Essentially, simulation learning is the process of recreating real-life medical scenarios for training purposes. It has long been used the by the military and aeronautics industries, but it’s increasingly being tapped by health care professionals who see the life-saving potential of training in a hands-on, high-pressure environment that mirrors typical and extreme emergency situations.



“We’ve come to realize that we can do better,” she says, referencing the opportunity to “improve both the collective medical response to an emergency situation and the patient experience through compassionate communication and other soft skills.”

Since the institute opened in 2013, Wang and her team have trained more than 5,000 people, averaging 400 “learner encounters” a month, in areas ranging from cardiac arrest to dementia sensitivity training. In Wang, Holy Name could hardly have found a better person for the job. A highly trained advanced practice nurse, gifted communicator and passionate educator, she possesses such a unique skill set that she easily balances simulation training with other duties ranging from grant writing and fundraising to marketing and, incredibly, construction management.

In 2016, Wang oversaw a 4,800-square-foot expansion of the simulation program, which was made possible by a $5 million grant from the Russell Berrie Foundation. The facility now features new simulated settings, including an apartment and a doctor’s office, as well as additional patient care rooms and a dual-purpose room that can be staged as an operating room or emergency room. “From cardiac arrest to seizures and childbirth, we are able to simulate every type of situation,” says Wang, explaining the crises her team of six full-team staff members (and their high-fidelity simulators) are capable of portraying.

Free ICU Healthcare Simulation Scenarios & Debriefing Guide

free medical simulation icu scenarios

ICU-IS-SIM is The Alfred ICU’s In Situ Simulation program, coordinated by Dr Chris Nickson. Each week we aim to involved at least 10-20 staff members as active participants in our in situ simulation sessions. This is typically performed within the unit, using real equipment, with team members performing their usual roles. Physical fidelity is achieved using simulation manikins or simulated patients in conjunction with iPads running the iSimulate ALSi software.

The sessions are designed to help staff develop the technical and non-technical skills required to function as a effective team in critical situations. An emphasis is placed on inter-professional communication and teamwork. Scenarios are based on core knowledge requirements, perceived knowledge gaps identified in other parts of the educational program, known high risk situations and sentinel events. Simulation-based education is also used in other aspects of The Alfred ICU Education program, including Tuesday teaching for senior registrars and regular sessions at the Center for Health Innovation simulation center (using SimMan 3G) during Wednesday afternoon teaching for all junior medical staff. We also use simulation to develop and fine tune processes within the ICU, such as our ECPR program and checklist development for emergency intubation and patient transport.

Scenarios from the ICU-IS-SIM program are provided as free-to-view google documents so that others can use and modify for their own education purposes. The scenarios are continually being revised and improved. Current free scenarios include:

Airway scenarios

  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and previous burns
  • Recognition of endotracheal tube dislodgement

Cardiac and cardiothoracic ICU

  • Pericardial tamponade post-cardiac surgery
  • Emergency intubation of a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and cardiogenic shock

End of life and organ donation scenarios

  • Determination of Death for Donation after Circulatory Death (DCD)

Haemodynamics / Shock and vasopressors

  • Hypotension due to disconnected inotropes
  • Hypertension due to measurement error
  • Hypotension in a trauma patient in ICU

Neurocritical care



  • Deteriorating GCS and raised ICP in a TBI patient (pending)
  • Intubation of a patient with myasthaenia gravis (pending)
  • Intubation of a patient with Guillain-Barre Syndrome (pending)

Renal

  • Hyperkalemia and cardiac arrest due to acute kidney injury (AKI)

Respiratory

  • Emergency intubation of severe asthma

Resuscitation

  • Unanticipated VF arrest in the ICU

Sedation and delirium

  • Delirium, physical restraints and aspiration
  • Management of an agitated patient with delirium

Sepsis and infectious diseases

  • Intubation of a patient with septic shock and severe metabolic acidosis

Tracheostomy emergencies

  • Respiratory distress in a patient with a tracheostomy following traumatic brain injury (TBI)
  • Respiratory distress in a tracheotomized obese patient with tetanus

Trauma and Burns

  • Hypotension in a trauma patient in ICU
  • Emergency intubation of a patient with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Burns
  • Airway emergency in a patient with facial burns and a wired ETT

Toxicology

  • Unverified overdose with occult calcium channel toxicity

Get access to all these free ICU scenarios, the Alfred ICU FAST-PAGE guide to debriefing, and more on the ICU-IS-Sim Website today!

SIMCharacters Launches New Campaign to Showcase Paul, World’s First High Emotion Preterm Simulator

high fidelity preterm simulator

*Update: The Facebook video announcing Paul went viral with over 4,000,000 views in the first week!

#WelcomePaul, the World’s First High Emotion Preterm Simulator — developed by SIMCHaracters and their CEO, Dr. Jens Schwindt — a leading expert in neonatology and healthcare simulation education. For the past three months I have spent extensive time with Jens and the amazing SIMCharacters team in Vienna as their Marketing and Strategy Consultant to learn more about this “Beyond High Fidelity” product, which advances the field of healthcare simulation with never before seen technologies — all of which fit neatly inside a completely wireless simulated body of a 27 week old infant!

Key Features of Paul:

  • Preterm baby born in 27+3 week of gestation
  • Highly realistic external anatomy
  • Weight: 1000g, length: 35cm, head circumference: 26 cm
  • Pathological breathing patterns (nasal flaring, paradoxical respiration, substernal retractions, and grunting).
  • Highly realistic upper airway ideal for practicing endotracheal intubation and special neonatological care strategies (MIST, INSURE)
  • Mechanical ventilation using bag-mask and Perivent® systems
  • Automatic tube position detection during intubation
  • Physiological and pathological lung parameters for machine-assisted ventilation
  • Palpable pulse on the umbilical cord and all four limbs
  • Sensors to detect the correct position and depth of an umbilical venous catheter (UVC)
  • Auscultatory respiratory, heart and intestinal noises
  • Cyanosis and hyperoxia
  • Completely wireless product with 1.5 hours of battery use

Working alongside Jens and the team, we helped to craft the demonstrative materials necessary to help you see Paul in action! Today I would like to share with you this awesome video that shares the story of SIMCharacters, Paul, and Jens:



And Download the New Brochure here:
paul premature simulator brochure

Having spent time seeing Paul in action and intubating him, I can say without a doubt that his technologies will forever change the way neonatology trains!

Are you attending IMSH in a few weeks? Email me and I will help to schedule a time with you and the SIMCharacters Team at the SimAlliance Booth to learn more about this amazing new product and company!

In the meantime, visit the new SIMCharacters Website to learn more about Paul and his amazing Features

Eight Critical Factors in Creating and Implementing a Successful Simulation Program from Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety

critical sim program success factors

Having just wrapped up our free posting of the HealthySimAdmin videos (8 recorded sessions focusing on the administration of medical simulation programs), we thought we might continue the series sharing other external resources on the topic, today sharing “Eight Critical Factors in Creating and Implementing a Successful Simulation Program” from The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety which was produced by Elizabeth H. Lazzara, PhD; Lauren E. Benishek; Aaron S. Dietz, MA; Eduardo Salas, PhD; and David J. Adriansen, EdD, NREMT.

Background: Recognizing the need to minimize human error and adverse events, clinicians, researchers, administrators, and educators have strived to enhance clinicians’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes through training. Given the risks inherent in learning new skills or advancing underdeveloped skills on actual patients, simulation-based training (SBT) has become an invaluable tool across the medical education spectrum. The large simulation, training, and learning literature was used to provide a synthesized yet innovative and “memorable” heuristic of the important facets of simulation program creation and implementation, as represented by eight critical “S” factors—science, staff, supplies, space, support, systems, success, and sustainability. These critical factors advance earlier work that primarily focused on the science of SBT success, to also include more practical, perhaps even seemingly obvious but significantly challenging components of SBT, such as resources, space, and supplies.

Conclusion: The eight factors—science, staff, supplies, space, support, systems, success, and sustainability—represent a synthesis of the most critical elements necessary for successful simulation programs. The order of the factors does not represent a deliberate prioritization or sequence, and the factors’ relative importance may change as the program evolves.

Consider specifically number 6: Systems



Systems should match fidelity requirements to training needs and ensure that technological infrastructure is in place! This is why considering events like SimGHOSTS is so important for your program!

For example, some simulators emphasize physical fidelity, in which the physical components of the task environment are replicated in the simulation. Physical fidelity, which can include not only equipment but even simulated patients, enables clinicians to practice technical and nontechnical skills in a safe environment that mirrors real-world conditions. Such simulators are most appropriate when trainees are learning how to use specific equipment or conduct specific procedures. The Center for Medical Simulation (Boston), for example, enhanced the physical realism of a critical care setting by including actual medical equipment and integrating oxygen and nitrogen systems. The center also uses a mannequin that has locking mechanisms to enable the instructor to control the positioning of the jaw and neck. Other types of simulations, such as personal computer–based systems, emphasize cognitive fidelity—the extent to which the skill in the real task is duplicated in the simulated task—over physical realism. High-cognitive-fidelity simulations are equally useful when the goal of training is to foster nontechnical skills such as problem solving and decision making that are needed in the task environment. For example, in a low-fidelity simulation, in which researchers at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California (Los Angeles) used material purchased from a craft store to develop a Total Abdominal Hysterectomy (TAH) teaching model, the simulation improved both knowledge and confidence among gynecology residents— illustrating that physical and cognitive fidelity are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Best practices for SBT in health care call for matching fidelity specifications to training requirements.

When determining the level of physical realism to incorporate in a simulation, system developers should partner with subject matter experts (for example, clinicians, nurses, administrators) and training experts to ensure that program objectives are realized. In addition to selecting the right type of simulator to employ during training, it is of paramount importance to ensure that the technological and organizational infrastructure is in place to support the training. For example, training systems that use laptops may require periodic software updates and are prone to all the familiar ills and frustrations of personal computers. Issues related to signal strength, server errors, and network security are also important considerations when using a local area network (LAN) or when using the Internet.

Read the full 8 Critical Factors Article here the Patient Safety Journal Website!

Top 51 Medical Simulation Posts of 2016!

top 51 healthcare simulation

The most read medical simulation articles of 2016. Happy New Years Medical Simulation Champions! Today, as we have every year since launching HealthySimulation.com in 2010 we are sharing the most read healthcare simulation posts of the past year. Did you know that since 2010 HealthySim has provided almost 1,000,000 article displays to more than 350,000 website visitors? Thank you for your continued support of this FREE medical simulation resource website!

Related to the General Use Simulation Across:

51. OSF HealthCare Partners with NIH and AHA to Create Online Medical Journal for 3D Hearts

50. Virtual and Augmented Reality Market To Reach $162 billion by 2020

49. Aviation’s Black Boxes Are Coming to Healthcare Training

48. Iqarus Provides Fully Immersive Live Action Combat Medicine Training Center in UK

47. Do Checklists Change Human Behaviors? Thoughts from Medical Lawyer Dr. Argy

46. You Won’t Believe the Future Tech of Healthcare Education

45. Vet Students Train with Simulators in New Lab at Cornell University

44. Toyota Utilizes VR to Showcase the Future of Driving Simulation

43. NASA Mars Mission Crew Emerges From Yearlong Simulation In Hawaii

News Stories Related to the Industry of Healthcare Simulation:

42. Tonight! Jeopardy Game Show to Feature Healthcare Simulation

41. Delta College Performs 6 Hour Trauma Simulation Scenario with Local Authories

40. UK TV Shows How CAE Healthcare Manikins ‘METIman’ are Made!

39. TEDx Talk: Simulation Necessary To Prepare for Birthing Emergencies

38. Homeland Security Simulation Center Offers Realistic Training for Disaster Preparedness

37. University of South Alabama Healthcare Simulation Program Covered by Local News

36. U.S. Army Awards Portion of $135M Medical Simulation Contract to ECS

35. Plymouth University Pennisula Offers Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma and Masters in Simulation & Pt Safety

34. The Newest Medical Simulation Center Designs May Surprise You!

33. Lance Baily To Support the Launch of New Preterm Simulator from SimCharacters

Society and Organizational Updates:

32. INSPIRE Provides Support to Healthcare Simulation Pediatric Researchers

31. 3rd Annual Asia Pacific Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare Launches in Singapore

30. 2-Hour Laerdal SimMan 3G Programming Course Now Available Through SimGHOSTS

29. California Simulation Alliance Workshops and Conference in October

28. Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare Updates

27. SimGHOSTS USA 2016 Opens at Jump Trading Simulation Center Sponsored by SimulationIQ

Vendor and Simulator Related Articles:

26. Cardionics Provides SimScope Auscultation Simulator for Real-Time Standardized Patient Learning



25. Laerdal’s SimMom Receives Non-Gravid Abdominal Skin Product Update

24. SimMon iTunes Patient Monitor Vital Sign Simulator App

23. Simulation Champion Provides Laerdal SimMan Ankle Fix

22. Southern California Simulation Collaborative Hosts TeleHealth Robotics and Laerdal Mini-SUN

21. Debrief2Learn Aims to Improve Healthcare Outcomes with Effective Debriefing Practices

20. CAE Healthcare Shares Patient Safety Foundation Info Graphic

19. Polhemus Brings Micro Sensor Motion Tracking to Healthcare Simulation

18. Beyond Debriefing – Studiocode from Vosaic Enables for High Level Research Studies for Healthcare Simulation

17. WISER Provides Simulation Courses For All Staff Positions

General Advice for Healthcare Simulation Programs:

16. Online Leadership in Simulation Instruction and Management Graduate Certificate Program from RMU

15. Teaching Patient Handoffs to Medical Students in OB/GYN: Simulation Curriculum and Assessment Tool

14. Why You & Your Simulation Program Should Avoid Flying United Airlines

Healthcare Simulation Program Administration:

13. 7 Steps to Achieving Record Growth For Your Healthcare Simulation Program

12. The Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget

11. 3 Key Resources to Expand Your Simulation Program

Top 10 Medical Simulation Posts of 2016:

10. SimCharacters Celebrates #WorldPrematurityDay With Launch of Paul, The World’s First High Emotion Simulator

9. Where to get Free Medical Simulation Scenarios

8. Top 9 Most Read Healthcare Simulation Articles from Summer 2016

7. Complete Administrator’s Guide To Healthcare Simulation ‘HealthySimAdmin’ Program Series Now Available for Free!

6. Supporting Transitions in Medical Career Pathways: the Role of Simulation-Based Education

5. Updates from SimGHOSTS, The Leaders in Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist Support

5. Media Covers May BMJ Article: “Medical Error 3rd Leading Cause of Death in U.S.” – Call for New Hashtag #SimToZero!

4. The Must-Own Healthcare Simulation Library *Updated for 2016

3. Medical Simulation Jobs Page

2. Top 11 Healthcare Simulation Articles of 2015 from the Top 51 Medical Simulation Articles of 2015.

1. Is This The Most Beautiful Healthcare Simulation Center in the World? You’ll never guess where one of the most beautiful healthcare simulation centers in the world is located!

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