Airport Hosts Simulated Crash Exercise for Emergency Preparedness Training

Airport hosts simulated crash exercise for emergency preparedness training

Gosanangelo.com recently reported how loud sirens and flashing lights filled the air in-between the runways at San Angelo Regional Airport recently, as part of an emergency preparedness exercise, which involved a simulated crash between commercial and military aircraft which included irst-responders from the San Angelo Fire Department. The EMS group arrived at the scene to administer ‘aid’ to the ‘victims,’ portrayed by local volunteers, and Goodfellow Air Force Base personnel.

The purpose of the exercise was to help prepare emergency personnel for real-world emergencies, which is a REGULATED practice in the aviation industry!

“It keeps us updated on our training (so that) we’re prepared and ready to handle any situation that takes place,” Firefighter Roger Hernandez said. “We like to keep (first-responders) on their toes,” Santos Elizondo, EMS coordinator for SAFD, added. Firefighter Shane Mathews leads volunteer ‘victims’ to awaiting buses that will take them to local hospitals, where training will continue Thursday, July 13, 2017, at San Angelo Regional Airport. (Photo: Cara DeLoach) The mock scenario went like this: a military aircraft had been in the process of landing at the airport, when it collided with a passenger aircraft stopped on the run-way.


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Following the script, the pilot and co-pilot of the military aircraft have ejected; one has serious injuries, and the other deceased, and 24 civilian passengers were scattered across the field with varying ‘injuries.’

Rescue crews followed protocol responding to the situation, first putting out the aircraft ‘fires’ and proceeding to help the injured, who used prosthetic makeup to simulate fake wounds. Responders applied first-aid to victims, and classified their injuries according to severity — all while being observed by leaders from the Office of Emergency Management and the San Angelo Fire Department. 

Simulations like these are “important because you can control an exercise. You can control how many dead, injured and missing you have … In real world situations you don’t really have too much of a control. You just try to make sure the damage doesn’t spread out,” said Zak Dale, who created the fake injuries, and works in Medical Logistics at Goodfellow Air Force Base.”


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