Royal College of Emergency Medicine Provides Safety Toolkit Including Simulation Resource Links

royal college patient safety toolkit healthcare simulation

Published in 2013 this Royal College of Emergency Medicine toolkit, prepared by the Safer Care Committee, is a useful starting point in providing the quality of patient care through the lens of patient safety which includes sections of the utilization of simulation.

What is the Toolkit?

This safety tool kit aims to describe the structures, processes and skills required for a ‘safe’ department. The original concept was that it would enable any Emergency Physician, starting from scratch, to construct a safety framework that contained all the key elements necessary to support the delivery of high quality care whilst at the same time being vigilant to ongoing risks. We acknowledge that in reality the majority of Emergency Departments will already have well established structures for ensuring safe care but it is also probable that not all elements are as effective as they should be; so we hope this toolkit will provide something useful for all.


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Ruth Brown explains how to use the safety toolkit

This toolkit is provided to Fellows as a comprehensive (but not exhaustive) resource for delivering safe care. We know many departments already have really good systems in place, whilst others are still developing them. It is also provided as a resource for senior trainees in thinking about their future role as a consultant. We suggest you could use this resource in a number of different ways:

  1. In your local departmental meetings – Ensuring that safety is considered in the meeting or by having specific safety meetings. We have included suggested agendas for such meetings in our toolkit section Departmental Activity Resources.’
  2. Working through the toolkit – You could take a section at a time, say over a year, and review the resources as a team, perhaps as a consultant CPD session or by asking an StR to present a summary. This embeds the content in everyone’s psyche and lends an importance to it.
  3. By discussing key topics with your managers and ensuring that all business plans and service developments are prepared using the toolkit as a resource for your document.
  4. Modeling your in –house education using the resources or accessing your Trust quality and safety team to deliver the education with you – they can add a dimension to the clinical content by talking about real cases from a risk perspective.
  5. One of the key chapters is Supporting the Second Victim. This is a relatively new concept and is particularly welcomed by staff. This might be the first section of the toolkit you review together as it will engage staff very early on.

Read the full resource with links here


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