Most Read Medical Simulation Articles From July

top medical simulation articles

Sim Champs, here’s a list of the “most read” articles from HealthySimulation.com’s website and free email newsletter for the month of July:

Simulated Patient ‘Allergic to Ink’ Warning Sign, Download to Save Your Manikins - Will Enfinger, Simulation Specialist at Des Moines University, has created a nifty “Allergy Warning Sign” which simulation champions can use to help prevent ink stains from learners.

Konsiderate Medical Simulation Product Review Website Opens Doors to Public – Last week Konsiderate.com, the world’s only medical simulation product and service peer-driven review website opened up its beta phase with a new way to login using your professional work email address.


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Mount Sinai ‘Director of Simulation Education’ Featured Job Listing - Spearhead the development, implementation and evaluation of educational programming, and oversee and provide guidance for educational research projects at the Center for Advanced Medical Simulation (CAMS) in NY.

Even More Free Nursing Simulation Scenarios – Download more of the free scenarios from these US-based resources.

NYIT Offers MS in Medical / Health Care Simulation - The College of Osteopathic Medicine offers a 36-credit Master of Science in Medical / Health Care Simulation program. This state-approved graduate program has been preparing professionals for careers in the growing field of human patient simulation education since 2012.

Want more Top Medical Simulation Articles? Check out the Most Read Articles Ever On HealthySimulation.com & our 2013 “Best Of” Top 50 Recap!


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Medical Student Speaks Up and Saves a Life — But Not Without Persistence

medical errors

Recently read this article on KevinMD.com about a 3rd year medical student risking his ego and speaking up for a patient he felt was in danger. While this story had a happy ending, you can see how much internal struggle Andrew goes through to request and then finally demand help. With an average of 1,000 patients dying a day due to medical error we have continue to ask why new medical and healthcare professionals are being trained into a system that has serious consequences for “wasting staff time” against saving patient’s lives.

Consider this story from 3rd Year Medical Student Andrew Ho:

As a third-year medical student, we are considered to be the bottom of the totem pole in the hospital. After spending the first two years studying for our Step 1 boards, the only clinical medicine we know comes from what we have read and heard about in books and lectures. Our questions are frequently met with laughter or are berated for lacking common sense. And in the fast paced world of the ED, nobody has time to answer stupid questions. “His nurse probably knew he had a head laceration,” I reasoned . “There’s no need to alert anybody. He’s not even my patient. The ED staff is more than capable of handling this.”

A minute passed. And then another. Nobody came by to see this patient, who continued to bleed. I hesitated against speaking up, since we were in the middle of a trauma. But I couldn’t wait any longer. I asked an ED nurse if he was her patient. “No,” she said before hurrying off. I told another nurse that a man was actively bleeding and he said, “Go get his nurse!” After a few more failed attempts, I had had enough and pulled aside my resident. “I think this man has been bleeding profusely for some time. What should we do?” His eyes widened as he saw the amount of blood that had soaked into the sheets. He reached for a pair of gloves and told me, “Get a suture kit, now!”

I hurried off to the supply closet and came back with a bunch of supplies. The patient was now writhing in pain as we dug around with our fingers inside his wound, trying to locate the bleeding vessel. We liberally injected lidocaine before exploring deeper with pickups and clamps. I tried to dab away the blood so that we could see into the laceration, but blood instantly filled the cavity. We couldn’t localize the source of the bleeding and our attempts to blindly clamp the vessel were met with frustration. Anytime we thought we stopped the bleeding, blood would spontaneously squirt out, like water spewing from a compressed hose. When the blood splashed up against our glasses, my resident and I looked at each other and knew we needed more help.

We wheeled the stretcher out of the back corner and into the trauma bay where we applied Yankauer suction into the wound. This helped us visualize the lacerated artery quickly. We clamped the vessel to stop the bleeding and tied it off with sutures. Given the amount of time he went unnoticed, we estimated that that patient’s estimated blood loss was anywhere from 500-1000 mL and gave him IV fluids to help replenish his intravascular volume. When the chaos had settled, a very surprised ED attending entered the bay. “He was playing on his cell phone just a few minutes ago!” she exclaimed. She thanked us for our work and my resident commended me with a quickly muttered, “Good job.”

A quickly muttered “good job” and no department follow-up or debrief? This was one time a medical student stood up but what about the next time his counter-part remains silent? Check out yesterday’s story on how “silence kills” in healthcare and learn about a book called “Beyond the Checklist” that shows us how we can fix this systemic problem.

Read the full story on KevinMD.com


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Smart Pump Training Simulator Through ‘HealthScholars.com’ of CSE Software

smart pump simulator cse software

Earlier this week I posted about the CAT Heavy Equipment Simulators from CSE Software, and today I am sharing about their mobile training simulator products for healthcare providers including a Heparin Adjustment Trainer and Smart Pump Training Apps. According to a report by CareFusion, 70% of heparin errors are caused by the wrong dose, omission and prescribing errors. The majority of heparin errors (47.6%) originate in administering the medication, followed by 18.8% in transcribing the order, 14.1% in prescribing the product, 13.9% in dispensing functions and 5.4% in patient/lab monitoring activities. These simulators can help train away these very errors! After reading the below information visit the “News->Videos” section of the Health Scholars website for more coverage of these apps.

Smart Pump Training Simulator
In this interactive app (shown above), hospital professionals will learn the proper operation of the Smart Pump and supporting software program used for patient safety. The actual pump has a built-in computer and it is constantly collecting and monitoring data. The system helps improve patient safety and reinforces best practices. Through the simulation of this device, healthcare professionals can ensure training on the infusion pump is delivered consistently and efficiently to personnel. The interactive app allows training to take place in a patient care environment, and in the presence of a preceptor. In addition, process and procedures can be covered to help personnel get a full understanding of the device.

heparin simulator

Heparin Simulator

In this interactive app, hospital professionals will learn how to properly administer the medication Heparin through a Smart Pump. Heparin is most often used as an anti blood clotting medication, and can be fatal if administered incorrectly. The app will take the user through several scenarios where he/she must correctly figure and administer the medication. Results can be saved for Internal viewing by administration.

So who is this innovative simulator company CSE Software?

cse software

CSE Software Inc. is located in the heart of the warehouse district in Peoria, Illinois. A technology company Founded in 1990 by Ken Pflederer, our current client base consists of large, Fortune 500 companies and small, family-owned businesses.  No company is too large or small to reap the benefits of our comprehensive services. They have developed over 2200 projects to more than 260 clients for 110 languages spoken around the world. As they are in Peoria, IL they have also started working with the awesome folks at JUMP Trading Simulation Education Center:

“In a strategic partnership between CSE Software Inc. and OSF Healthcare at the Jump Trading Simulation & Education Center, Peoria, Ill., CSE is developing simulations for both medical devices and medicine administration. The correct use of medical devices and proper administration of medication is critical to patient care and safety. The ability to train with realistic tools and environments ensures that medical professionals learn the same techniques as they will use in a real-world medical situation. CSE Software Inc. is proud to be a partner in this endeavor with OSF Healthcare.”

Visit HealthScholars.com to learn more about these Smart Pump Training Simulators and CSEsoftware.com to learn more about this innovative company!

Silence Kills: Can Technology Drive Meaningful Cultural Change In Healthcare?

technology in healthcare communication

CEO of X Tech Ventures Robert Szczerba has posted another great article connecting the future of healthcare and technology. In this LinkedIn post he reminds us that an AACN report entitled ‘Silence Kills’ reported that out of 1700 healthcare professionals “84 percent of doctors observed colleagues who took dangerous shortcuts when caring for patients and 88 percent worked with people who showed poor clinical judgment. Despite the risks to patients, less than 10 percent of physicians, nurses, and other clinical staff directly confronted their colleagues about their concerns.” Robert continues to explore this gap in healthcare communication:

In the years following this study, there has been a strong movement by a number of companies to develop improved communication and patient safety tools. However, the 2010 follow-up study The Silent Treatment concluded, “that while safety tools are one part of the solution to improving patient care, they do not compensate for crucial conversation failures in the hospital. Silence still kills.

A common perception in the healthcare industry is that the underlying cultural environment limits technological advances in safety and efficiency. Following this logic, no significant advances can be made until major cultural changes occur. However, what if technology was not necessarily limited by culture, but, if applied correctly, could actually be used to drive a desired cultural change?

Read the full article entitled “Silence Kills: Can Technology Drive Meaningful Cultural Change in Healthcare” on LinkedIn


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Next Wednesday Morning: Watch SimGHOSTS USA Opening Keynote Address Sponsored by Level 3 Medical

Level 3 Medical

Level 3 Medical has sponsored the SimGHOSTS 2014 USA @ CHEST (#SG14USA) keynote address, presented by recently appointed SimGHOSTS President James Cypert! This event will be broadcast and streamed LIVE Wednesday morning Day 1 of the main event at the American College of CHEST Physicians in greater Chicago, IL – so even if you can’t make the USA event this year you should mark your calendar to watch this free session.

TIME: NEXT WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6th, 8AM CDT (UTC-5), 6AM PT, 9AM ET

SimGHOSTS proudly introduces Level 3 Medical as the Platinum Sponsor of 2014 USA Event. Sponsoring both the Opening Keynote address and the Opening Reception at PinStripes Bowling, Level 3 Medical is looking to powerfully connect with the SimGHOSTS international community. As well, the SG14 event team has added a special plenary panel Friday morning to dive deeper into the Level 3 Medical build-out of the Cedars Sinai Simulation program. Be sure to stop by their booth to learn how they can help your simulation program too!

SimGHOSTS President James Cypert will present on the importance of bringing in basic research methods in support of the professional development of Simulation Techs. He will begin a conversation about community focus and topics for future research and invite a networking dialog to establish collaboration opportunities for designing, conducting, collecting, writing, and submitting well‑formed research. The goal of this year’s keynote address is to provide some of the basic tools, resources, and methods for providing evidence‑based practice for simulation technologists, ascertaining cogent research topics, and identifying collaborative opportunities, and establishing working relationships to achieve higher levels of dialog from and with the technician community.

Level 3 Medical Sponsored SimGHOSTS 2014: USA Keynote address “Of Mice and Geeks: Elevating the Dialog Through Research”

James Cypert - Technology Director – California Baptist University, President, SimGHOSTS

“By seeking and blundering we learn.” - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

When the concept of “research” for the typical geek invokes images of Gandalf at Minas Tirith frantically searching through the hordes of scrolls and tombs looking for information about the One Ring. For others, it could be an image of Master Yoda and Obi‑Wan in the Jedi Temple discovering the betrayal of Anakin. That imagery aside, research is fundamentally exactly this, a search for the truth of any matter, and research can be done by anyone. In fact, we all conduct research at various levels. The issue at hand however, is how does one go about conducting research that is acceptable to others that is well‑formed, and answers definitively any given question. With that in mind the purpose of this session is to explore the basic research methods for the simulation technician.

The learning objectives of this keynote are:

1. Acquire knowledge about basic research methods
2. Identify the core components conducting of research
3. Discuss possible topics for SimGHOSTS community research focus
4. Identify individuals in the community that can be used as resources for research

James will present basic research methods that everyone can apply, then begin a conversation about community focus and topics for future research. To wrap up the session the facilitator will invite a networking dialog to establish collaboration opportunities for designing, conducting, collecting, writing, and submitting well‑formed research.

About Level 3 Medical:

The medical division of Level 3 has been providing advanced multimedia solutions in minimally invasive surgical environments and simulation centers since 2007. This Phoenix based medical engineering group has pioneered designs in telehealth, live HD video distribution, recording, archiving, content management and media retrieval systems for medical universities, teaching hospitals and simulation labs. Level 3 Medical’s core competency is integrating the myriad of medical, simulation, broadcast and professional technology into a seamless, easy to use system or application. Our approach is to work directly with our clients to understand their use case and apply technology to improve efficiency, work flow, profitability and/or learning. Examples of our applications include; intraoperative surgical suites, digital O.R.’s, nursing simulation centers, procedure rooms, 3D visualization facilities, clinical AV networks, campus-wide central recording systems and video conferencing initiatives for collaboration and critical decision making.

Level 3 Medical was founded as a division of Level 3 Audio Visual who has been well established in the commercial industry since 1996. Level 3 AV had been working with a major medical university on their classroom presentation technology when they were presented with a challenge from the Dean of Anatomy. Level 3 AV was asked to design and build a cordless, wireless, mobile HD video cart for their anatomy lab. The Dean and his faculty had several uses in mind for this cart but Its main purpose was to capture high definition video from a student’s cadaver, transmit that video to an AV head end, store and meta-tag the captured video while simultaneously transmitting the video back out to twenty, high definition, LCD monitors dispersed around the lab as well as to a secondary lab located across the campus. A secondary purpose of this cart was for the creation of video text books that could be produced and stored online as an additional reference for the medical staff and students.

The creation and use of this cart was a major success for both Level 3 Medical as well as the University. Level 3 Medical realized they had just created one of, if not the first ever, high definition telemedicine carts and, for the University, use of this cart was shown to increase both test scores as well as enrollment.

Level 3 Medical is a customer focused group of medical engineers trained in the process of applying current technology to existing medical work spaces, medical training centers and simulation labs.

Visit the SimGHOSTS 2014 USA Level 3 Medical Opening Keynote Address Page Wednesday morning to get the link!

 

CAT Simulators – Heavy Equipment Operators Can Now Train Safely Through Simulation

CAT simulator

Every boy (and still many men) have a dream to drive around a big tractor, bulldozer or other heavy piece of construction machinery. Well, now from the folks at CSE Software that is entirely possible with their CAT Simulators – designed to safely train and prepare heavy machinery operators for their unique jobs.  In the not to distant future I believe that every job training will have an element of simulation which is why from time to time I share how simulators continue to increase in other industry verticals.  Simulation as training methodology is here to stay, especially as the technology becomes more advanced and more affordable. Check out these two videos which highlight a new Logging Simulator with synchronized hydraulic seat movement and a testimonial from a CAT educator about the benefits of working with simulators for education and recertification.

Why Simulators in Heavy Equipment?

Simulators aren’t new to the industry, but many companies don’t understand the cutting edge training they offer for heavy equipment operators. Simulators are easy to use, cost effective, and allow operators to be well trained and comfortable before being placed in the cab of an expensive piece of equipment. They combine technology and operator instruction with rich graphics and realistic controls to help operators feel like they are in the actual machine, allowing them to become familiar with and memorize the machine’s essential operating techniques.

“I think simulators are important for the overall training experience,” says Tom Whitworth, an account manager for Simformotion LLC, the licensee for Cat® Simulators for Caterpillar Inc. “A simulator provides training in a virtual environment. It keeps the operator and other ground personnel out of the equation and out of harm’s way.”

Training exercises on the simulator are measured and recorded for each operator’s simulator sessions. That way, the operator can see how well he/she performed. An instructor can check the results to determine if there are areas of inefficiency that need further instruction and additional training time.

“We use our simulators almost every day here,” says Danny Turner, training and development coordinator at Aecon Mining in Alberta, Canada. “In the last four months, we’ve had 250 trainees go through our training center.”

The use of simulators allows operators to make mistakes without endangering themselves or the equipment. This is huge. No one wants to put a greenhorn behind the wheel of a haul truck or at the controls of a loader, excavator, or other expensive machine without knowing he/she can operate it correctly.

“If you make a mistake on a simulator, it’s better than making one on a machine,” Whitworth says. “A trainer can immediately explain to the operator what he did wrong, give him instructions on how to do it correctly, and allow the operator to practice until he has mastered the operation.” Shared here is a case study highlighting a “Technical College That Found Cost Savings with Simulators”.

About SimForMotion LLC

“A leader in heavy equipment simulator training solutions – is the licensee for Cat® Simulators for Caterpillar Inc. Cat heavy equipment simulators deliver dynamic training technology and outstanding safety results through the power of state-of-the-art virtual training. These training simulators help businesses dramatically lower costs; address initiatives such as safety and production; while ensuring training can be delivered anytime day or night, regardless of weather conditions. Cat Simulators are chosen as training solutions in such markets as mining, contracting, government, forestry, and trade and vocational schools. Ken_Lara_ReneeSimformotion LLC is owned and run by three tech-loving gurus who also own sister company, CSE Software Inc. Ken Pflederer founded CSE in 1990. Vice Presidents Lara Aaron and Renee Gorrell joined him as partners in 1992. In 2008 they formed Simformotion LLC as the simulator arm of the company. The development teams have the capabilities to program all types of simulation software and engineer tandem hardware, whatever the machine, tool, or industry.”

Next I will post more about CSE Software who have also successfully built training simulators in healthcare. Interested in vehicle simulators in other industries? Check up my write-up on Police & Fire Rescue Simulators.

 


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Help Fund Movie That Connects Aviation Simulation to Healthcare Simulation

aviation team training into healthcare

IndieGoGo, a crowd-funding platform for independent projects, is hosting the opportunity to donate towards: “Beyond the Checklist: A Feature Length Documentary Film”, which explores how lessons from industries like aviation can provide solutions to the crisis of patient deaths and injuries in healthcare. I urge you to join me in pledging towards this important documentary film which will attempt to show how training in the aviation business using evolved communication practices has lead to an incredible safety record, especially in comparison to the number of deaths attributed to medical error now occurring in the United States.

The Concept Behind the Film:

“On January 9, 2009. US Airways Flight 1549 landed in the middle of the frigid Hudson River in New York. Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger and his crew – as well as ferry and Coast Guard crews – had all practiced and trained in teamwork for years. Which is why not a single passenger or crew- member was seriously injured when the plane was totally disabled when struck by a flock of Canada Geese.

Our 60-minute film will demonstrate that healthcare can transform its culture and stem the epidemic of medical errors and injuries in the US and elsewhere. It can do this by learning lessons from the safety model and culture change movement that transformed commercial aviation over the last 30 years and that has been successfully adapted to make other high-risk industries much safer. The film “Beyond the Checklist” shows exactly how this safety model and culture can be implemented in the healthcare industry.

Take a trip on a $14 million dollar flight simulator, and see how pilots, fight attendants, ground crew, and air traffic controllers all learn to work together to make air travel safer. Sit in on training sessions that teach people on very different rungs of the health care hierarchy how to communicate so they can form quick teams and react instantly in crisis. Here, pilots aren’t only graded on how well they guide a plane during both routine flights and crises but on how well they communicate and work as a team with their crew. Flight attendants mechanics, and gate agents and many others learn to speak up when appropriate and challenge each other, as well as the captain and rather than experiencing “push back,” they are thanked for it.

“Crew Resource Management gave you a process and a language…so that if I said to you, captain I’m not comfortable with this, he had to hear that because it was done in a way that we were all trained,” recalls Nancy Burns, who was a flight attendant for 39 years both and experienced the change in culture when aviation introduced CRM. “It meant that if you spoke up they had to listen. It also meant that you had a responsibility to speak up.” Airline personnel are also encouraged to report mistakes – even serious violations – without being punished and all airlines share information about near misses, errors, and other problems to change practice and insure safety.

The film concludes by showing how the lessons of these pioneering practitioners and institutions can be implemented in every single hospital and health care facility so that every patient everywhere is safe. Each and every one of us will someday be a patient. Our lives and the lives of our loved ones depend on whether our caregivers are trained to work together as a team, can learn together to prevent mistakes, and are able to create a culture of safety in healthcare.”

Click here to learn more and donate to the Beyond the Checklist Documentary Film!

SIMStation Provides Cutting Edge Video Recording Debriefing Systems to EU

simstation

I have recently been made aware of SIMStation, an Austria-based company providing medical simulation A/V recording and debriefing hardware & software that’s already creating a lot of buzz in the European Union. Having watched their video I can attest to the claimed simplicity of their GUI (Generated User Interface) which looks simple to operate and manipulate. SIMStation will be at ASPIH 2014 in the UK later this year so if you are in the EU, that will be the best place to check out this new emerging company and product. I love how the system captures direct wireless microphone audio from participants which should produce better sound results, and I am always a fan of anything that shoots, captures, displays and records quickly in HD! Their products are in numerous centers around the EU and they have plans to expand into the United States in the near future.

About the Company

With the professional background of 20 years international expertise in the media software and media technology field, SIMStation was founded in 2011. With the support of currently 17 employees, we design and develop innovative audio-video debriefing systems, and we are providing consultant services in planning and implementation of technical facilities for medical simulation centers. As technicians and enthusiasts for medical simulations we see it as our task to set a new standard in the area of audio-video-debriefing with our mobile and fixed facilities.

About SIMStation From Their Website:

SIMStation is Mobile:

More and more frequently, in-situ simulation trainings are being conducted in the familiar work environment, e.g. a hospital´s intensive care unit or emergency room rather than in a special simulation center.The SIMStation system can be used both in a mobile or stationary capacity. Thanks to a lightweight aluminum design and to carefully selected components that are as compact and space-saving as possible, the SIMStation system fits in any car and can be effortlessly set up within a few minutes directly at the training location.

Video Recording in HD-Quality

Although it is compact and portable, the system shows no loss in quality when compared to stationary systems – quite the opposite: SIMStation offers four individual video channels in HD-quality! Video signals can be optionally displayed during recording or debriefing in quad split screen view or HD full screen. As Application Development Partner of AXIS, the global market leader in network video, we have access to the best and most reliable video recording technology and are able to integrate this in our systems.

Outstanding Audio Quality

We believe that optimal clarity of the spoken word is a particularly relevant factor which is not sufficiently considered in many debriefing systems in use. In order to optimally identify ‚human factors‘ in particular, i.e. strengths and weaknesses in communication and team coordination, the excellent transmission and recording of each spoken word is essential. The SIMStation comes equipped with professional wireless microphones used in stage technology which allows for individual and synchronous recording and transmission of communication of up to six training participants.

SIMStation Recording Software

The SIMStation recording software with touchscreen interface handles audiovisual recording and at the same time offers trainers the option of inserting easy and precise marks and notes during training simulation. The exact timing of important events such as the administration of drugs, intubation or cardiac massage can be stored via preconfigured icons just as notes on good or bad communication or coordination may be saved.

SIMStation Debriefing Tablet

It is important to create a discreet and personal environment during debriefing, letting technology fade into the background. Debriefing may take place in a room in the immediate vicinity of the training room. With this in mind, SIMStation offers a compact and mobile debriefing unit, controlled by tablet. During debriefing, the trainer only needs the SIMStation Tablet with which individual scenes marked or annotated during training can be played back on an HD- television set or projector.

SIMStation Live Player

The compact SIMStation LivePlayer System allows you to transmit sounds and images of any training live to several rooms.

simstation medical simulation recording

Download the SIMStation PDF Product Sheet Here to learn more and then visit the SIMStation Website!


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Central Florida Continues to Push Medical Simulation Innovations

advances in medical simulation

Terri Bernhardt wrote an article earlier this year for i4biz.com, which promotes entrepreneurship through Central Florida, covering the topic of Medical Simulation. The article is a great highlight of where simulation is, and where it is all going. Highly recommend this one!

Excerpt from i4biz.com:

“No commercial airline pilot or military aviator ever takes off in a multi-million dollar aircraft without logging countless hours in a flight simulator. Military and commercial aviation learned long ago it was not only much cheaper (one tenth the cost of live training), but it was far more effective to train personnel in lifelike scenarios where failure was an option. In fact, it was part of the learning experience.

The transition from simulating jets, tanks and helicopters to simulating patients in emergency or clinical situations faced by combat medics, nurses and doctors has been quickly evolving, in an industry that has called Central Florida its home for over 40 years.

This inventive group combines science, engineering and art to make fake blood that feels, smells and clots just like real blood. They turn a high-fidelity mannequin into a groaning, twisting man with congestive heart failure that is so realistic that the trainee sweats while trying to stabilize him. These same people develop serious games that take nurses through triage and combat medics through tying tourniquets in real time with life-like scenarios, followed by an after action review for effective memory retention.

With all eyes on Lake Nona’s Medical City, breakthrough simulation technologies, medical research and medical training are able to converge. Harry Robinson is the national program manager of the Veterans Health Administration’s Simulation Learning Education and Research Network, “SimLEARN.” For the retired Navy aviator, the ability and potential of simulators to duplicate real life scenarios was obvious. “Just like when I was a squadron commander, we are able to replicate an actual situation, in this case a medical procedure or medical emergency situation, in a safe environment, where there is no danger or inconvenience to a human patient. Also, trainees are able to both develop the skills (in diagnosis and in muscle memory) and then have a meaningful debrief, where we actually watch the training exercise.

What’s Next?

Greg Welch, Ph.D., the Florida Hospital Endowed Chair in Health Care Simulation at UCF, has been working in the field in one form or another for decades, but his current work is taking medical simulation to a whole new level. Currently, medical personnel are sometimes trained using actors that emotionally and physically imitate the behavior of someone with a particular condition, but there are limits to what an actor can mimic. What is more, there are limits to the number of actors and frequency of times these scenarios can be simulated.

Welch is working not to simply duplicate the movements, the feel or the anatomical authenticity of a medical android, but its mental and emotional behavior. “Part of the diagnostic procedure is really an interrogation of sorts, to actually determine what symptoms the patient is experiencing.  To successfully do that you have to understand how to communicate with the patient and empathize with their condition; you have to learn what questions to ask, along with developing the patience that is necessary to succeed in that process.

“My area of expertise and my passion over the last 20 years has been about simulating human interactive experiences. This is a physical/virtual reality, which simulates human behavior with the goal of building a computer-controlled system that mimics human responses for medical or health care related training,” continued Welch. “To do that you have to study human interaction and transfer that knowledge to a patient/clinician experience that is lifelike and authentic. We want to simulate the fear, pain, discomfort of a patient and help the clinician learn to be comfortable interacting and doing what is sometimes awkward or socially inappropriate to do.”

Read the Full “Heart of Medical Simulation Article” on i4biz.com!

3D Printed Anatomy To Revolutionize Medical Training

Check out this amazing story coming out of Australia where 3D Printers are being used to create anatomical models for medical education!

3d printed anatomy

From the Monash University Website:

“The creators of a unique kit containing anatomical body parts produced by 3D printing say it will revolutionise medical education and training, especially in countries where cadaver use is problematical.

The ‘3D Printed Anatomy Series’, developed by experts from Monash University, is thought to be the first commercially available resource of its kind. The kit contains no human tissue, yet it provides all the major parts of the body required to teach anatomy of the limbs, chest, abdomen, head and neck.

Professor Paul McMenamin, Director of the University’s Centre for Human Anatomy Education, said the simple and cost-effective anatomical kit would dramatically improve trainee doctors’ and other health professionals’ knowledge and could even contribute to the development of new surgical treatments.

“For centuries cadavers bequested to medical schools have been used to teach students about human anatomy, a practice that continues today. However many medical schools report either a shortage of cadavers, or find their handling and storage too expensive as a result of strict regulations governing where cadavers can be dissected,” he said.

“Without the ability to look inside the body and see the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels, it’s incredibly hard for students to understand human anatomy. We believe our version, which looks just like the real thing, will make a huge difference.”

After scanning real anatomical specimens with either a CT or a surface laser scanner, the body parts are 3D printed either in a plaster-like powder or in plastic, resulting in high resolution, accurate colour reproductions. The kit, which is set to go on sale later this year, could have particular impact in developing countries where cadavers aren’t readily available, or are prohibited for cultural or religious reasons.”

Read the full article on 3D Printed Anatomy from Australia’s Monash University here!