Teaching Patient Handoffs to Medical Students in OB/GYN: Simulation Curriculum and Assessment Tool

mededportal simulation

MedEdPortal, a division of AAMC, just released this healthcare simulation curriculum and assessment tool for those teaching patient handoffs to medical students in OB/GYN. You must be a subscriber to the website to get the full toolkit.


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Patient handoffs, the communications required for the safe transfer of patient care, are known to be a common source of medical errors. Simulation exercises are effective techniques for teaching the procedures and patient interaction skills involved in a handoff. We developed a teaching tool that allows students to individually interact with a simulated patient, develop a treatment plan, and practice a handoff to another provider. The curriculum is a flexible instructional tool to teach patient handoffs in the context of a simulated obstetric emergency for learners at the clerkship through first-year obstetrics and gynecology resident levels. The curriculum secondarily teaches management of first-trimester bleeding with acute blood loss and can be adapted to allow advanced learners to practice obtaining informed consent.

To evaluate this simulation for educational effectiveness, we developed a faculty observation assessment tool. The simulation assessments for history taking, fund of knowledge, and interpersonal skills were predictive of subsequent clerkship clinical grades. Eighty percent of students agreed the exercise was realistic, 95% agreed it was relevant to the clinical curriculum, 90% agreed the simulation taught handoff skills, and 73% agreed the simulation increased confidence in handoff skills. Students uniformly found the curriculum to be relevant, realistic, and effective at teaching handoff skills. Use of this curriculum has the potential to improve students’ communication skills, handoff performance, and confidence during an obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. The assessment tool may allow early identification of students in need of improvement in communication skills.

Read the full article and get the toolset here on MedEdPortal!

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Poverty Simulation Helps Shape Future Healthcare Professionals

poverty simulation

Has your nursing program considered running a poverty simulation? Help your healthcare learners not only see the benefits of simulation outside the lab context, but also better understand the difficulties faced by less fortunate members of your community. Here’s how NDSU is using simulation to teach their nursing students about poverty:

Students at the NDSU School of Nursing at Sanford Health in Bismarck will get a glimpse into how a family in poverty navigates the complexities of life. More than 60 senior nursing students are scheduled to take part in a poverty simulation experience at Bismarck State College.

During the simulation, the nursing students will role-play the lives of low-income families, from single parents trying to care for their children to senior citizens trying to maintain their self-sufficiency on Social Security. The task of each family is to provide food, shelter and other basic necessities while interacting with various community resources.

Brittney Mueller, simulation coordinator at NDSU School of Nursing at Sanford Health, said the goal is to enable participants to view poverty from different angles and begin to understand what life is like with a shortage of money over an extended period of time. “As nurses embark on their careers, they will one day work with patients facing difficult decisions on a regular basis,” said Mueller. “Deciding whether to buy food or pay for health care is something that some people may face on a monthly basis.

Aviation’s Black Boxes Are Coming to Healthcare Training

black boxes in healthcare

This summer I was thrilled to provide the SESAM closing plenary address where I shared the past, present and future of healthcare simulation — and made direct calls for healthcare to integrate a “blackbox” into healthcare. The argument is simple: recording devices have been successfully improving aviation training and performance outcomes since the 1970s — and in a day and age where police body cameras are becoming affordable for every single officer, clearly healthcare is on a similar path. Today here is more support for such a conversation from Richard Corder, Partner at Wellesley Partners which provides Executive Coaching in Boston and throughout the Northeast:

There are many industries, other than healthcare, that work in complex environments where the actions of one human can impact the life of another. Healthcare leaders need to acknowledge the reality that we have much to learn from other industries. While we cannot mimic others entirely, the same general operating principles (including mindfulness that serves as the overarching organizational spirit) that are the foundation for other high reliability organizations (i.e.: aviation, nuclear power) can work just as well to prevent harm from occurring in health systems.

One example of a safe practice or technology that could shared across industries is the in-flight data recorder found on all commercial airliners. It was because of the in-flight data recorder on board the two Boeing 747s that crashed into one another on the island of Tenerife in 1977 that we learned so much about the decisions and behaviors resulting in that game-changing airline disaster.  The time stamped voice commands of those at the controls were captured in real-time, and provided a blueprint of what “not to do” along with a snapshot of what needed to be changed.

Now envision this: following a surgical procedure, regardless of the outcome, we have the opportunity to review every piece of data related to the procedure.

Read the full article on Healthcare Executives Network

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Healthcare Education Training Expands MedSim Magazine Content

medsim magazine

Halldale’s MedSim Magazine has expanded its focus into a new group called “Healthcare Training And Education”, which features a recently launched website. While no longer specifically focusing on healthcare simulation like HealthySimulation.com, the resource does cover medical simulation topics while also covering topics relevant to the larger topic of improving healthcare training.

About HTE

The mission of Healthcare Training and Education (HTE) has become to be one of the leading sources of Healthcare, Training and Education information by providing an unprecedented level of value to our customers through quality, relevant and timely content.

Preparing the Next Generation of Healthcare Professionals

HTE aspires to promote the best education and training practices for the next generation of healthcare professionals. Experienced professionals in medicine, simulation and training write our content to address the needs of medical practitioners, educators and academics around the world. HTE features innovative healthcare practice information such as the latest simulations developed to train different medical professionals at different stages of their education. It also covers curriculum advancement to highlight the knowledge and skills needed to ensure patient safety and reduce healthcare costs.

Your Comprehensive Source for the Latest Healthcare News and Opportunities

In addition to our original content, HTE is your comprehensive source for a variety of other important healthcare industry tools and resources including conferences and career opportunties

A Division of The Halldale Group

Halldale is a modeling, simulation and training company in the B2B media space. Our company is unique by having a global team of expert writers who are also simulation and training experts. Halldale’s editorial team comprises of practicing medical training experts and ex-simulation industry professionals. Halldale has a dedicated publishing and event team working around the world.

Learn more at HealthcareTrainingAndEducation.com!

Collaborative Simulation Program Development – HealthySimAdmin Video Series Part 1

expanding a medical simulation program

Last week we announced that the highly praised HealthySimAdmin video series is being made publicly available for the first time. Today we post Part 1: Collaborative simulation program development, across institutions and disciplines, which you can watch below:

Imagine splitting the cost of a brand new simulation center and operational program in thirds, while simultaneously increasing access to equipment, space and staff support. Now also consider the benefits of partnering with other healthcare professional disciplines to further breakdown the traditional educational training silos through your simulation program. Dean Carolyn Yucha RN, PhD, FAAN from UNLV’s Nursing and Allied Health Programs will launch our discussion into how to develop a multi-disciplinary multi-institutional collaborative simulation center. Dean Yucha spent three years leading the development of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas, which supports the clinical education of three distinct institutions across a multitude of disciplines. Following Dean Yucha’s presentation, the HealthySimAdmin panel of experts will continue the discussion of related topics such as stakeholder identification and board/committee needs, types of umbrella administrative structures, architectural design considerations, financial reimbursement systems, building and program support services, legal requirements, ongoing collaborative issues and more. Funding models will be touched upon briefly but will be explored in greater depth during subsequent sessions. Audience question and answer sessions will follow the lecture and panel discussion. In summary, in this session we will learn how to build and continue a successful collaborative partnership for a medical simulation program.

About the Presenter

Carolyn Yucha RN, PhD, FAAN is Dean of the School of Nursing and the School of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She was a developer of the CSCLV and serves on its Advisory Committee. Dr. Yucha earned her academic credentials from the State University of New York system: her BS in Nursing from the University at Albany, her MS in Nursing from the University at Buffalo, and her PhD in Physiology from Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse NY. She worked at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the University of Florida before moving to Las Vegas. Dr. Yucha has received research funding from the National Institutes of Health, has published numerous articles, and is editor of a scientific journal, Biological Research for Journal.

Dr. Yucha was instrumental in creating the original concept of the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas. She worked with architects to design the space and worked closely with other Deans to develop the curriculum, staffing, and financial model to sustain the center. She serves on the Advisory Committee for the CSCLV.

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The Newest Medical Simulation Center Designs May Surprise You!

designing a sim center

Looking for inspiration for your new sim center? Check out these four new simulation buildings, including a very innovative design from Columbia University:

1) The Vagelos Education Center, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Gensler (as Executive Architect), is a new medical and graduate education building at Columbia University’s Medical Center. The building’s design—which weaves together state-of-the-art medical simulation clinics and labs, tech-enabled classrooms, communal areas for study and socializing, and event spaces—reflects how medicine is taught, learned, and practiced in the 21st century.

Learn more about the Vagelos Education Center at Columbia University

2) The Stephen F. Austin State University Richard and Lucille Dewitt School of nursing is one of only three facilities in Texas that has an onsite simulation lab: The Ed and Gwen Cole Simulation Laboratory, a Laerdal Center of Educational Excellence. The simulation lab is 9,000 square feet with a 10-bed medical surgical area, labor and delivery area, nursery and neonatal area, health assessment lab and an emergency room area. Real medical equipment like IV pumps and crash carts add to the reality of the simulation lab. “It’s a bridge between what we teach the students in class and actual clinical, face-to-face, live humans,” David Smith, coordinator of the simulation lab and clinical instructor, said. “It gives the students a chance to put into practice what they’re learning in class in a risk-free environment.”

Learn more about the new Austin State Sim Lab

3) Hibbing Community College: Over the past three years, Hibbing Community College has developed their new hi-tech Healthcare Simulation Center. They have three rooms that include two clinic bays, an OB and ICU unit, a homecare area, and an infectious control setup. “It’s just cutting edge. It’s preparing students for future practice and it’s real life right in front of them,” said the Director of Nursing, Sandy Gustafson. The health center features high-fidelity mannequins that breathe, have pulses and heart tones, and one even simulates child birth. Students get the hands-on experience they wouldn’t get just by watching in a real hospital setting.

Learn more about the Hibbing Community College Sim Center

4) St. Clair County Community College: The students were working in the newly renovated health simulation labs in the AJ Theisen Building. The renovation is the result of a $350,000 project that combined older medical and surgical simulation equipment with new tools and moved them to the annex of the Theisen Building. Having students work in simulation labs, in which the verbal manikin have pulses and students can hear their hearts and lungs, is not exactly a new concept for SC4 — they have been doing this for the past six years. However, the old simulation lab was in the basement of the Clara E. Mackenzie Building and in a less realistic setting.

Learn more about the St. Clair County Simulation Building

Latest Simulation in Healthcare Journal Article List from SSH

medical simulation research journal

The most recent Simulation in Healthcare Journal (October 2016 – Volume 11 – Issue 5
pp: 301-364) from the Society for Simulation in Healthcare has been posted online! This month’s journal provides a tribute to the “godfather” of medical simulation Dr. Gaba, and an exploration of new simulation technologies to improve healthcare learning outcomes:

  • Tribute to David Gaba on the Occasion of His Retiring as Editor-in-Chief of Simulation in Healthcare Cooper, Jeffrey B.; Issenberg, Barry S.; DeVita, Michael A.; Glavin, Ronnie
  • Comparison of 4 Laryngoscopes in 2 Difficult Airway Scenarios: A Randomized Crossover Simulation-Based Study Altun, Demet; Ozkan-Seyhan, Tulay; Orhan-Sungur, Mukadder; Sivrikoz, Nukhet; Camci, Emre
  • Mastery Learning of Video Laryngoscopy Using the Glidescope in the Emergency Department Ahn, James; Yashar, Michael D.; Novack, Jared; Davidson, Joey; Lapin, Brittany; Ocampo, Jose; Wang, Ernest
  • Preparation With Web-Based Observational Practice Improves Efficiency of Simulation-Based Mastery Learning Cheung, Jeffrey J.H.; Koh, Jansen; Brett, Clare; Bägli, Darius J.; Kapralos, Bill; Dubrowski, Adam
  • How Do Simulated Error Experiences Impact Attitudes Related to Error Prevention? Breitkreuz, Karen R.; Dougal, Renae L.; Wright, Melanie C.
  • Coaching From the Sidelines: Examining the Impact of Teledebriefing in Simulation-Based Training Ahmed, Rami A.; Atkinson, Steven Scott; Gable, Brad; Yee, Jennifer; Gardner, Aimee K.
  • The Role of Ultrasound Simulation in Obstetrics and Gynecology Training: A UK Trainees’ Perspective Patel, Hersha; Chandrasekaran, Dhivya; Myriokefalitaki, Eva; Gebeh, Alpha; Jones, Kate; Jeve, Yadava B; Midlands
  • Research Collaborative in Obstetrics & Gynecology Simulation for Operational Readiness in a New Freestanding Emergency Department: Strategy and Tactics Kerner, Robert L. Jr.; Gallo, Kathleen; Cassara, Michael; D’Angelo, John; Egan, Anthony; Simmons, John Galbraith
  • An Approach to Confederate Training Within the Context of Simulation-Based Research Adler, Mark D.; Overly, Frank L.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Davidson, Jennifer; Gottesman, Ronald; Bank, Ilana; Marohn, Kimberly; Sudikoff, Stephanie; Grant, Vincent J.; Cheng, Adam;
  • For the International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators Highlighting Instructional Design Features in Reporting Guidelines for Health Care Simulation Research Cheng, Adam; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Chang, Todd P.; Auerbach, Marc

SSH Members can read the latest journal edition here!

Newfoundland SimSummit Starts This Week By Royal College of Surgeons Canada

simulation conference newfoundland canada

Taking place later this week in NewFoundland Canada is the Simulation Summit, a conference connecting healthcare simulation champions and vendors together. Are you participating in the conference, tweet to us @HealthySim and share your favorite moment!

The Simulation Summit is a unique and practical, interprofessional medical simulation education conference, which attracts hundreds of international simulation educators, researchers, health care professionals and other individuals engaged in the field of simulation.

The 2016 conference theme, Extreme Simulation, will explore simulation research, learning and practice in a spectrum of contexts and settings, from hospitals and university teaching centres, to rural and remote locations.

Participants at the 2016 Simulation Summit will have the opportunity to collaborate with international colleagues on knowledge translation as it relates to simulation in healthcare; examine new technologies in medical simulation; investigate advances in medical simulation and much more.

Participants at the 2016 summit will:

    • Collaborate with international colleagues on knowledge translation as it relates to simulation in the health professions.
    • Investigate advances in medical simulation for health profession in the realm of assessment and education
    • Examine new technologies in medical simulation for health professions; and
    • Plan to integrate medical simulation for health professions across the education spectrum from students to practitioners.

Learn more on the Simulation Summit Website!

How to Start or Expand a Healthcare Simulation Program – HealthySimAdmin Videos Available for Free

healthcare simulation management

Over the past month HealthySim has been focusing on the skillsets, considerations, tactics and strategies to start or expand your healthcare simulation programs. Recent articles have included:

To continue this discussion HealthySimulation.com has decided, for the first time, to make publicly available the 8 recorded sessions from HealthySimAdmin — an event specifically focusing on the administration of Healthcare Simulation programs. These sessions bring together champions from a multitude of simulation program shapes and sizes, from small community colleges to massive military training bases, to present and discuss the key areas identified by the community necessary to successfully build or expand a medical simulation program. The original event was hosted by UNLV’s School of Nursing, and was sponsored by Laerdal, B-Line Medical, and Pocket Nurse, and has been watched by more than 500 simulation programs around the world since it debuted.

Reasons to Watch HealthySimAdmin:

  • Expand your knowledge by learning from a diverse group of sim adminsThe HealthySimAdmin panel of experts is comprised of successful simulation program administrators from a variety of settings including: community, state and university nursing schools, medical schools, EMS programs, hospitals, IT departments, and the military. Additional panel members will include leading industry consultants who have designed and managed sim labs around the globe. HealthySimAdmin will not only share “proven-to-work” techniques from others in your field but also provide an expanded perspective from others that utilize medical simulation within healthcare.
  • Learn from your new professional community
    Currently there are no professional degrees in medical simulation program management. Simulation program administrators have varied experience which may include successful or maybe, not so successful, strategies for managing a simulation center/lab. For example, a sim lab program manager with an IT background will have little trouble integrating their center’s network technology, but may find clinical educator training and buy-in much more challenging. In that sense, our growing international community is the best resource we have for learning and sharing the best practices in each of the numerous facets necessary to operate a simulation lab. HealthySimAdmin’s mission is to create a global and shared community online space where healthcare simulation program administrators can find and share information unique to medical simulation management.
  • Participate from anywhere in the world
    What happened in Vegas did not stay in Vegas with HealthySimAdmin! With any high-speed internet connection you will be able to watch HealthySimAdmin wherever you are. Join an international audience of healthcare simulation managers who have already watched HealthySimAdmin and gain global insight into the operations and development of a successful medical simulation program.
  • Maximize your time with medical simulation admin specific content
    While the methodology of simulation in healthcare continues to expand exponentially across the globe, the discussions regarding the operations and management of this technology are relatively new. And while other medical simulation-based meetings do exist, they primarily serve our community’s clinical educators. Thus, resources and guidance for program administrators remains limited. To address this challenge, HealthySimAdmin held an event specifically designed to meet the needs of healthcare simulation program administrators. Catch up to the hundreds of other administrators who have already watched HealthySimAdmin and maximize your time and resources by engaging with content that is as unique as your profession.

Each of the following videos starts with a 40 minute presentation by the associated key speaker which is then followed by 60 minutes of discussion and Q&A session by the entire expert panel:

  • Session A: “Collaborative Simulation Program Development” – Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN (Total Run Time: 1H:38M)
  • Session B: “Funding Sources & Models” – Carolyn Yucha, RN, PhD, FAAN & COL (Ret) John McManus, MD, MCR (Total Run Time: 1H:45M)
  • Session C: “Clinical Educator Training & Buy-in” – Jane Kleinman RN, MAOM (Total Run Time: 1H:55M)
  • Session D: “Research Development” – Amar Pravin Patel, MS, NREMT-P, CFC (Total Run Time: 1H:36M)
  • Session E: “Daily Operations” – Henry Henao MSN, ARNP, FNP-BC, EMT (Total Run Time: 1H:58M)
  • Session F: “IT Structures & Issues” – James Cypert BAP, BAIT, MCSE, MCT, MCP (Total Run Time: 1H:50M)
  • Session G: “Increasing Utilization” – Allen J. Giannakopoulos, Ph.D. (Total Run Time: 1H:50M)
  • Session H: “Business Development & Revenue Generation” – Lance Baily, HealthySimAdmin Organizer, (Total Run Time: 1H:56M)

Originally valued at $450, you can now stay tuned each week to HealthySimulation.com for a new HealthySimAdmin video to be shared and posted for free!

SimulationIQ IPE Provides Case-Based Virtual Patient Training For Healthcare Teams

ipe learning system online

Did you know that half of the suggested 440,000 deaths attributed to medical error are communication related? By providing healthcare students and professionals with more ways to study case based simulations, online, in their own time, together — is certainly a must have for every healthcare organization. What attracts me to this learning system is that multiple learning participants can participate on a case scenario which follows a patient over time, letting educators see communication between IPE over a longer period of time, even ongoing!

Enter SIMULATIONiQ IPE. Education Management Solutions, providers of SimulationIQ, now provide this case-based virtual patient IPE solution replicates different disciplines working together on a common case using an innovative technology platform. The IPE solution can be used to augment existing IPE programs and allow your faculty to operate at maximum efficiency, so that instructors can focus on what they do best: educate.


Breakdown in Communication

SIMULATIONiQ IPE provides full visibility of case, actions, treatment plan across all professions to facilitate cross-discipline communication.

  • Role-based practice simulation
  • Integrated chat and discussion forum functions


To avoid misdiagnosis, SIMULATIONiQ IPE offers visibility to diagnosis and care plan across disciplines to facilitate shared decision making.  This integrated team approach is facilitated by:

  • An interactive team-based question solution
  • Robust communication options including – voice conferencing, screen sharing, chat and discussion forums
  • Simulation scenario sessions to augment online or traditional courses

Coordination of Care

To improve coordination of care it provides immediate feedback to actions and orders that inform and allow for better coordination of the patient care team.

  • Real-time lab and discussion results
  • Total visibility to all facets of patient care
  • Assessment of best practice care knowledge through team and role-based questions
  • Reflective debrief to develop critical thinking skills

Learn more at the SimulationIQ IPE Website!