Pocket Nurse Needs Our Help to Win Grant!

Pocket Nurse has applied for a Main Street Grant being offered by CHASE to expand their Medication Administration offerings and ultimately decrease medication errors. To Qualify they need 250 votes from the HealthySimulation.com community! Mission Main Street Grants is a grant program by Chase to award twenty (20) small businesses with grants of $150,000.

chase main street grants


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Steps To Help Pocket Nurse Win:

  1. Go to this link: https://www.missionmainstreetgrants.com/
  2. Enter ZIP CODE 15061 where it says “Vote for Your Favorite Business”
  3. Click “VOTE NOW”  on the Pocket Nurse page
  4. Sign into Facebook and your vote will be recorded

Please pass along to friends and family with facebook accounts so we get enough votes! Thank you all for your help!

Simulation Solves The Traveling Salesman’s Dilemma

“The simple truth behind simulated annealing? Sometimes things really do have to get worse before they can get better.”

For fun today I am sharing this recent article by Todd Schneider entitled “The Traveling Salesman with Simulated Annealing” that highlights some interesting lessons from a computer simulation which he built and shared:

“I built an interactive Shiny application that uses simulated annealing to solve the famous traveling salesman problem. You can play around with it to create and solve your own tours. Here’s an animation of the annealing process finding the shortest path through the 48 state capitals of the contiguous United States:

simulation of traveling salesman

We start by picking an arbitrary initial tour from the set of all valid tours. From that initial tour we “move around” and check random neighboring tours to see how good they are. There are so many valid tours that we won’t be able to test every possible solution, but a well-designed annealing process eventually reaches a solution that, if it is not the global optimum, is at least good enough. Here’s a step-by-step guide:

  1. Start with a random tour through the selected cities. Note that it’s probably a very inefficient tour!
  2. Pick a new candidate tour at random from all neighbors of the existing tour. This candidate tour might be better or worse compared to the existing tour (i.e. shorter or longer)
  3. If the candidate tour is better than the existing tour, accept it as the new tour
  4. If the candidate tour is worse than the existing tour, still maybe accept it, according to some probability. The probability of accepting an inferior tour is a function of how much longer the candidate is compared to the current tour, and the temperature of the annealing process. A higher temperature makes you more likely to accept an inferior tour
  5. Go back to step 2 and repeat many times, lowering the temperature a bit at each iteration, until you get to a low temperature and arrive at your (hopefully global, possibly local) minimum. If you’re not sufficiently satisfied with the result, try the process again, perhaps with a different temperature cooling schedule

The key to the simulated annealing method is in step 4: even if we’re considering a tour that is worse than the tour we already have, we still sometimes accept the worse tour temporarily, because it might be the stepping stone that gets us out of a local minimum and ultimately closer to the global minimum. The temperature is usually pretty high at the beginning of the annealing process, so that initially we’ll accept more tours, even the bad ones. Over time, though, we lower the temperature until we’re only accepting new tours that improve upon our solution.

That’s all well and good, but why do we need the annealing step at all? Why not do the same process with 0 temperature, i.e. accept the new tour if and only if it’s better than the existing tour? It turns out if we follow this naive “hill climbing” strategy, we’re far more likely to get stuck in a local minimum.”

In healthcare simulation, we could possibly use the same mathematical methodology to improve training outcomes and ultimately patient safety by considering that although minor immediate improvements may be better, we need to explore ALL the potential variations to come up with the most efficient systems.

Read the rest of this unique simulation article on ToddwSchneider.com!


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Center For Medical Simulation Emphasizes Simulation Instructor Reflection

harvard medical simulation

Gary Rossi, Chief Operating Officer at Harvard’s Center for Medical Simulation recently shared this video interview of Jenny Rudolph, Associate Director for the Institute for Medical Simulation, which was taken during a visit to Spain’s Hospital Virtual Valdecilla:

Earlier this summer during a faculty retreat at the Hospital Virtual Valdecilla (HvV), Jenny Rudolph recorded this video where she talks about the importance of people and their ability to reflect and understand their thinking and emotions as simulation instructors.

The Hospital Virtual Valdecilla is an Affiliate of the Center for Medical Simulation. It serves a reference Center for Simulation throughout Spain, Mexico, Central and South America. 

About CMS:

Founded in 1993, CMS was one of the world’s first healthcare simulation centers and continues to be a global leader in the field.

Simulation training at CMS gives healthcare providers a new and enlightening perspective on how to handle real medical situations. Through high-fidelity scenarios that simulate genuine crisis management situations, the CMS experience can open new chapters in the level of healthcare quality that participants provide.

At CMS the focus is on communication, collaboration, and crisis management in order to develop skills and teamwork behaviors that are best learned actively under realistic conditions. Since it first opened in 1993, CMS has run over two thousand courses and trained thousands of participants using its innovative and challenging scenarios. We are proud to feature:

  • A multidisciplinary, expert staff, affiliated with some of the world’s most well-known and well-respected hospitals, medical universities and colleges
  • Exceptionally high-quality and innovative programs in full-environment facilities
  • A breadth of course offerings

CMS has been a leader in the healthcare simulation field since putting its first mannequin simulator into service in 1994. We have developed courses for clinicians, healthcare educators, administrators and managers, conducted research on a spectrum of topics, helped manufacturers to conduct human factors trials of their technologies and continue to initiate an array of healthcare simulation activities.

For more information about CMS’ Affiliate Program , Consulting & Training Services be sure to visit the CMS Website!

Top Medical Simulation Articles of Summer 2014

healthcare simulation article reviews

Took the summer off? Went to Disneyland? Go on holiday? No matter, HealthySimulation.com has you covered with the most-read articles from this past summer. We tallyed the clicks from our newsletter and reviewed the analytics from the 37,000+ visits to this free healthcare simulation resource website to see what were the “hottest” summer articles. Don’t miss out on future updates by signing up for our free simulation newsletter then catch up with the articles below!

  1. Medical Simulation Job Listings - Looking for a new gig or need to post your open simulation staff position? This is the most comprehensive list on the internet!
  2. 3D Printed Anatomy To Revolutionize Medical Training - Check out this amazing story coming out of Australia where 3D Printers are being used to create anatomical models for medical education!
  3. Simulated Patient “Allergic to Ink” Warning Sign – Download to Save Your Manikins! – Will Enfinger, Simulation Specialist at Des Moines University, has created a nifty “Allergy Warning Sign” which simulation champions can use to help prevent ink stains.
  4. The National Council of State Boards of Nursing Releases Results of National Simulation Study – A Longitudinal, Randomized, Controlled Study Replacing Clinical Hours with Simulation in Prelicensure Nursing Education,” which concluded that substituting high quality simulation experiences for up to half of traditional clinical hours produce comparable end of program educational outcomes.
  5. Bridging The Gap Between Clinical and Non-Clinical Simulation Technicians – If you are a non-clinical Sim Tech you may be asking what you can do to learn more about the pathophysiology of the human body. Here are many apps for the ipad/iphone for assisting with this process.
  6. Free ECG Simulator Game – SimGHOSTS President James Cypert forwarded along a great 6-second ECG Simulator game where healthcare learners can practice identifying one of 27 most common rhythms.
  7. More Free Nursing Simulation Scenarios – The Kansas State Board of Nursing has a free library of simulation scenarios designed by nursing faculty for nursing and allied health programs.
  8. “And, Scene!” – Some More Great Places to get Simulation Scenarios – Programming is worth every difficult minute as the over efficiency of your Simulation Program increases ten fold with each successfully programmed and permanent scenario, but here’s a list of places to get started with your scenario library.
  9. Clinical Skills Lab Coordinator Standard Operating Procedures Example – Recently I shared the Standard Operating Guide developed at the Clinical Simulation Center of Las Vegas for both the IT and Clinical Simulation Technology Specialists. In this article I share the “SOPs” for the position of Skills Lab Coordinator.
  10. CAE Healthcare Updates – CAE Healthcare’s News Feed has been a popular destination for medical simulation champions this summer!

Lastly, if you are looking for more great clinical simulation articles check out HealthySim’s:


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Gaumard Scientific Completes First U.S. Installations of New Victoria Birthing Simulator

noelle birthing simulator

Today I received word that Gaumard’s new birthing manikin “Victoria S2200″ has been successfully installed in the first of many simulation centers. Think of Victoria as the “2.0” version of Noelle – with features looking so lifelike you are sure to keep questioning if what you are seeing is actually a manikin. Victoria can simulate low and high risk deliveries with an endless variation of clinical presentations and she can do so with precise repeatability. The patented fetal delivery system, powerful control software and a library of preprogrammed scenarios combine to allow learners to resolve situations in a safe environment, improve performance in specific situations and gain valuable experience. As a manufacturing pioneer in realistic manikin skins, it’s no wonder that Gaumard continues to push our industry to new heights. I hope to see Victoria at ASPIH UK this November, and for sure at IMSH 2015 New Orleans!

Gaumard Scientific Company today announced completion of the first U.S. installations of its new Victoria birthing simulator. The installation sites are:

  • Adena Health System, PACCAR Medical Education Center, Chillicothe, Ohio
  • Carolinas HealthCare System, Carolinas Simulation Center, Charlotte, N.C.
  • Billings Clinic, Simulation and Experiential Learning Lab (SELL), Billings, Montana

Introduced earlier this year, Victoria is the latest addition to the family of NOELLE maternal and neonatal care simulators. Victoria has a patented, precision life-like delivery and birthing mechanism that births a life-like, full-term baby with sophisticated monitoring capabilities. The Victoria system includes comprehensive clinical scenarios, including shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage. With articulating endoskeletons and silky smooth elastomeric skin, Victoria is the most realistic, fully tetherless and wireless maternal/fetal simulator for use in actual point of care training.

John Eggert, Gaumard’s executive vice president, said: “Hospital administrators, insurance companies and educators are looking for ways to improve patient care, reduce medical errors and reduce costs, especially in the area of obstetrics. More than 200,000 Americans die from preventable medical errors each year, and the cost to the healthcare system exceeds $17 billion. One third of medical errors by trainees involved the care of obstetrics and gynecology patients. When medical errors happen in obstetrics, settlements of cases may cost millions of dollars. Victoria represents true innovation in patient simulation based on input we obtained from health care educators worldwide. Most importantly, Victoria enables the simulation of care as it would be in real practice and stands as a platform on which Gaumard will develop other simulation applications.”

About Gaumard Scientific

Gaumard Scientific Company has designed, manufactured and marketed simulators for health care education for more than 60 years. Users worldwide – the military, emergency medical services, major teaching hospitals and nursing schools – recognize Gaumard products for their innovation in simulation in the pre-hospital, obstetrics and gynecology, surgical and nursing care segments. In 2000, Gaumard launched the revolutionary family of NOELLE maternal and neonatal care simulators that changed the way training is conducted. In 2004, Gaumard pioneered the use of fully tetherless technology with the introduction of the family of HAL simulators. In 2014, the company introduced Victoria™, its most advanced, mobile maternal/fetal simulator as part of the NOELLE family. Gaumard manufactures its products at its world headquarters in Miami.

For more information, visit Gaumard’s Victoria Page!

“New Validation for Simulation Education” ANA Article from INACSL VP Lori Lioce

american nurse simulation

A recent article on the American Nurse by Lori Lioce Clinical Associate Professor & Simulation Coordinator at the University of Alabama Huntsville entitled “New Validation for Simulation Education” covers the continued evolution of healthcare simulation, the recent NCSBN landmark research study results, and the INACSL standards — all of which are helping to support the increase of medical simulation in healthcare education. Lori is also a Family Nurse Practitioner, Vice President of operations for INACSL and a Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator. Below is some excerpts of this must-read article:

Technology and improved teaching and learning strategies are changing education as we knew it. A 2013 review conducted by David Cook of more than 1,000 individual studies with more than 50,000 participants revealed that “technology-enhanced simulation is consistently associated with large, statistically significant benefits in the areas of knowledge, skills and behaviors.” And “for direct patient effects, such as major complications, mortality, or length of stay, the benefits are smaller but still significant.” These findings, published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, underscore what many nursing educators and students have experienced firsthand.

Keys to successful simulation training experiences

loriHealth care simulation is used in a variety of settings for student and employee orientation, physiologic assessment, deliberate practice, on-demand clinical experiences, reflective exploration, competency validation, communication and teamwork development, remediation, and high-stakes testing. The beauty of simulation-enhanced learning is that it uniquely and deliberately allows participants to make mistakes at the bedside in a controlled environment with no risk to a patient. Health care simulation shouldn’t replace all clinical experiences. However, specific and purposeful integration of simulation can be an incredible process to witness. Further, the subsequent debriefing, whether at the bedside or in a formal debriefing room, allows participants and peers to safely discuss competent practice, rehearse peer-to-peer communication, identify and correct errors and explore the implications for patients, apply clinical practice protocols, and examine clinical reasoning with a knowledgeable facilitator. Personally, I enjoy seeing the “light go on” in the face of the participants when they really “get it.” The rapid discussion of how they made the connection from their reading or didactic education to clinical application is the key. They are excited, and it is contagious. That’s when I know we have had a positive experience.

Successful simulation requires planning and practice. A programmatic framework with specific steps is essential to support successful repeatable outcomes. The process may include a theoretical framework, orientation to the simulator, an explanation of the facilitator and participant roles and expectations, and preselection of specific achievable and measurable objectives. Participants should understand this process. The participant should lead and be empowered through pre- and post-briefing to achieve true change in practice through discovery learning.

Often administrators, staff, novice facilitators, course managers, clinicians and even participants may underestimate the preparation needed. In the educational environment, where you may have multiple groups repeating the same simulation, I am an advocate for a simulation expert and facilitator-led “dry run” of all simulations before implementation with participants. The dry run without participants allows the facilitator to see the experience from the participants’ perspective and ensures selection of a pre- and post-simulation process, especially when there are different facilitators within a course for each clinical group. This deliberate planning provides a vital opportunity for selection of learning preparation assignments, didactic coordination, review of and emphasis on objectives, coordination of vital equipment and medications, altering of the scenario, and agreement on a scenario stopping point. Most important, it verifies the presence of all physical and verbal cues that enable the participants to follow the clinical reasoning. Without these, simulation may not be aspirational or improve patient outcomes. Several vital components of a successful simulation learning program are dedicated simulation staff, effective coordination and scheduling, and an experienced debriefer — one who can guide the participants in discovery learning and not steal the “aha” moment. In fact, once a facilitator sees that light come on for the participants, he or she may never want to lecture again.

National and state regulation

Be aware that rules and regulations are being considered in various states regarding the use of simulation. In fact, in June 2013, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) completed data collection for a three-year multisite study on the use of simulation in prelicensure programs. The results are being released Aug. 13 at the NCSBN annual meeting in Chicago. I encourage you to periodically check with your state boards for specific updates.

Standards for best practice

With the rapid expansion in the field of health care simulation, standards for best practice have become increasingly important for quality, consistency, outcomes, and improvement of simulation programs and learning strategies.

In 2011, the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) published the seminal work Standards of Best Practice: Simulation. This document includes seven standards, and each standard includes specific criteria, outcomes and rationales. The standards provide a vital framework for decreasing clinical variability, planning strategically, initiating research and providing faculty development.

Four new standards, identified in 2013, are currently being prepared for publication in 2015 to address simulation design, research, standardized patients and interprofessional education.

Read Lori’s Full Article here on The ANA Website and order a copy of the Standards of Best Practice: Simulation at www.inacsl.org.


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Australia’s Clinical Skills Development Service Celebrates 10 Year Anniversary

csds-10-years

Earlier this week The Clinical Skills Development Service (CSDS) celebrated 10 years of providing healthcare simulation training throughout Queensland, Australia. The Queensland Health Clinical Skills Development Service (CSDS) is one of the world’s largest providers of healthcare simulation. We deliver education and training to Queensland Health staff and external healthcare providers at the Skills Development Centre and state-wide. The focus of our education and training is on clinical skills, communication, and crisis management, delivered via eLearning and face-to-face simulation. Based at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital campus, our centre covers over 3500m², with 26 session rooms, laboratories, and a fully functional operating theatre and hospital ward. As part of the celebrations, CSDS held an open day at the Skills Development Centre located on the RBWH campus which shared simulation experiences, Pocket Simulation Centre Showcases, Timeline displays and immersive scenarios!

One of the genius models the CSDS has implemented is their “hub-and-spoke” model of equipment utilization:

CSDS provides a large range of support services to Pocket Simulation Centres and Skills Centres to improve state-wide simulation education access across Queensland, using a hub- and-spoke model.

The hub–and-spoke model consists of the Brisbane Skills Development Centre (hub) linking to the other Queensland Skills Centres and Pocket Simulation Centres, providing in situ training within Hospital and Health Services across Queensland.

The services and tools provided include:

  • setting up and maintaining audiovisual equipment
  • providing access to a large pool of simulation equipment
  • access to an online curriculum and resource sharing database
  • accreditation tools that provides a quality framework for simulation education sites.

Learn more about this model and the CSDS through the Free-To-Watch Plenary Session Address provided by CSDS Director Dylan Campher recorded at SimGHOSTS 2014 Australia at the University of the Sunshine Coast!

More information on the CSDS 10 year celebration can also be accessed via the CSDS Homepage!

NAEMSE Symposium Takes Place Next Week in Reno, NV — EMS Educators Don’t Miss Out!

naemse-2014

Next week is the annual National Association for Emergency Medical Service Educator Symposium, taking place the 16-21st at the Peppermill Resort Hotel in Reno, NV. The Annual Symposium is an event that is held each year in different cities around the country. It is an opportunity for EMS Educators to come together and network with other EMS educators. The symposium consists of educational pre-conferences and general/break-out sessions that are designed to help the educator better hone their teaching skills and take those new ideas back with them to the classroom. It also gives attendees the chance to visit the Exhibit Hall where EMS exhibitors will give attendees one-of-a-kind face to face time and information regarding their respective products.

About NAEMSE:

The National Association of EMS Educators is a 501 ( c ) non profit educational association that has been incorporated since 1995. It is a professional membership organization that is made up of over 3,000 EMS educators, both nationally and internationally, that include Instructors, Program Directors, Deans, Training Officers, EMS Physicians, EMS Nurses and EMS State Officials. It is governed by a board of directors and the home office headquartered in Pittsburgh, PA. The staff of NAEMSE is made up of an Executive Director, Business Manager, Education Coordinator, Membership Coordinator, Project Coordinator and Communications Coordinator.

 

The annual NAEMSE Symposium is the premiere educational event that is held each year in different locations around the country. It is an opportunity for EMS Educators to come together and network with other EMS educators. The Symposium consists of educational pre-conferences, general sessions and break-out sessions that are presented to help the educator advance their teaching skills and take those new ideas back to the classroom. In additional to learning new skills and networking, all participants receive “take home” resources to use in their classrooms.  Also there is an exhibit hall where educators can view the latest in EMS equipment, textbooks and educational technology. Visit Symposium to find out more information.

Are you attending the show? Email or Twitter @HealthySim to connect!

There’s still time to Register – Learn more at the NAEMSE 2014 Symposium Website


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The Ultimate Job Guide to Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists

healthcare sim tech

About once a week I get an email from a simulation champion asking about the position, job description, responsibilities, hiring, career path or administration of a Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist. Because of the frequency of this question I have started to compile a list of TOP posts we have shared here on HealthySimulation.com regarding this specific topic. Of course, the #1 source for Sim Tech information is SimGHOSTS.org, but below is a great place to also get started on the topic!

First, check out this DACUM Simulation Job Analysis work accomplished California Healthcare Workforce Initiative

Simulation Technology Specialist - Job analysis in MS Word for technician working with high fidelity patient simulation manikins.

Simulation Program Coordinator - The Simulation Program Coordinator is a healthcare professional who is responsible for the development, implementation and evaluation of the integrated simulated clinical experiences to enhance participants learning outcomes.

Below is the Material HealthySimulation.com has written or recorded on the Topic of Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialists:

  1. What to REALLY look for When Hiring a Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist – Speaks to the types of backgrounds and skill-sets that work well as Sim Techs.
  2. Avoid the Number One Sim Tech Hiring MistakeDon’t jeopardize your program by hiring for the wrong position, this article extensively covers the question: Why Do Healthcare Simulation Programs Hire Sim Techs Without Technical Backgrounds?
  3. Community Feedback Agrees: Sim Techs Need Technical Background – Lots of community response regarding the article above in support of the conversation.
  4. How to Start a Career as Healthcare Simulation Technology Specialist - Want to get a job as a Sim Tech to operate Healthcare Simulation Technology? Do you have a background in IT, technology, AV, healthcare, theater or education and want to change careers? Are you interested in using your technical experiences to help train healthcare professionals? Check out this 1 hour webinar provided by Lance Baily, founder of HealthySimulation.com about how to start a career as a Sim Tech!
  5. Best Practices For Medical Simulation Hiring: The goal with hiring for your simulation-based positions is to not necessarily find candidates with the most simulation experience, nor even the most medical experience, but rather the person who has demonstrated the most passion for the position. No matter how strong the core of your simulation program is, we are talking about a technology and methodology that will continue to evolve and disrupt your training program. Thus, finding individuals who are comfortable with change and go to work everyday looking to “learn something new” will far far better serve your program.
  6. Great Interview Questions When Hiring a Sim Tech – Specifically looking to hire a Medical Simulation Technician? Read this practical guide  for hiring individuals to run your medical simulation lab technology.
  7. Simulation in Healthcare Education, A Best Evidence Practical Guide – Dr. Barry Issenberg, Director of the Gordon Medical Simulation Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and co-author of AMEE Guide #82 “Simulation in Healthcare Education: A Best Evidence Practical Guide PART-2″ reminds us here of the importance of considering the practical implementation of medical simulation.
  8. Stream 15 Hours of Sim Lab Administrative Content – Hundreds of Sim Lab Managers from around the world have watched this “How-To” content of Medical Simulation Administration.
  9. How to Increase Sim Lab Staff without Increased Budgets – Imagine having four extra staff members to help with the hands-on work necessary to make a special event run smoothly, or additional sim techs to help run multiple labs at the same time.  Expanding your medical simulation staff support can be easier and more affordable than you think.  To find out how read this article!
  10. Medical Simulation Staff Needs? Webinar on Program Development Overcoming the challenges of being a medical simulation program administrator. New resources for managers of simulation labs, simulation technicians, developing a collaborative simulation program, expanding your simulation program within your organization and with external partners, staff needs regarding moving into a new building and weekly operations, developing new policies and modifying old ones and scheduling suggestions for simulation labs.

Timothy Clapper PhD Articles on TeamSTEPPS Communication Training Opportunities for Medical Simulation Programs

dr timothy clapper

Just received an email from my good friend Timothy Clapper, PhD regarding yet ANOTHER great article he has produced regarding TeamSTEPPS communication practices with regards to healthcare simulation. TeamSTEPPS was developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality utilizing CRM communication models from the space and aviation industry. Timothy’s work continues to innovate within our community, helping simulation champions better recognize and utilize simulation as a medium for revolutionary change within healthcare.

TeamSTEPPS is a teamwork system designed for health care professionals that is:

  • A powerful solution to improving patient safety within your organization. An evidence-based teamwork system to improve communication and teamwork skills among health care professionals.
  • A source for ready-to-use materials and a training curriculum to successfully integrate teamwork principles into all areas of your health care system.
  • Scientifically rooted in more than 20 years of research and lessons from the application of teamwork principles.
  • Developed by Department of Defense’s Patient Safety Program in collaboration with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

TeamSTEPPS provides higher quality, safer patient care by:

  • Producing highly effective medical teams that optimize the use of information, people, and resources to achieve the best clinical outcomes for patients.
  • Increasing team awareness and clarifying team roles and responsibilities.
  • Resolving conflicts and improving information sharing.
  • Eliminating barriers to quality and safety.

Timothy’s Letter and Article Links:

Dear Lance & HealtySimulation.com Readers,

Just an update on my latest article for TeamSTEPPS. You may recall that my first article described TeamSTEPPS and the need for this tool to improve patient safety. I am happy to share that this article is still at #25 on ScienceDirect’s top 25 articles!

This was followed by a second article that outlined some reasons why TeamSTEPPS programs fail and ways to work through those issues. My latest one, just released, focuses on next steps in TeamSTEPPS, including the observation that must be done to assess additional simulation training needs.

Clapper, T. C., & Kong, M. (2012). TeamSTEPPS: The patient safety tool that needs to be implemented. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 8(8), e367-e373. doi:10.1016/j.ecns.2011.03.002

Clapper, T. C., & Ng, G. M. (2013). Why your TeamSTEPPS program may not be working. Clinical Simulation in Nursing,9(8), e287-e292. doi:10.1016/j.ecns.2012.03.007

Clapper, T. C. (2014, in press). Next steps in TeamSTEPPS®: Creating a just culture with observation and simulation. Simulation & Gaming. doi:10.1177/1046878114543638

Enjoy!

Tim

Timothy C. Clapper, PhD

TeamSTEPPS Master Trainer and American College of Surgeons Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) Educator
Editor, Healthcare Section, Simulation & Gaming (S&G): An International Journal of Theory, Practice and Research
Public Member, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Review Committee for Anesthesiology
Adjunct Professor & Sr. Instructor, Graduate Instructional Technology Certificate Program University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, College of Education
Dissertation Chair Grand Canyon University, College of Doctoral Studies
Simulation and Education Consultant – TC Curriculum & Instructional Design, LLC

If you are interested in learning about TeamSTEPPS and how it can be used by not only your healthcare staff, but simulation team staff as well, check out the Laerdal sponsored SimGHOSTS 2013 Opening Keynote address provided by Dr. Timothy Clapper, which is permanently available for free on SimGHOSTS.org thanks to Laerdal!

Also, connect with Timothy through his website TC Curriculum & Instructional Design