Does Residency Simulated Training Have an Impact on Patient Outcomes in Robotic Surgery

simulated training

Christopher Simmonds from Mimic Technologies recently shared on LinkedIN some interesting research statistics regarding the patient results from simulated training in surgery.

Join the World’s Largest LinkedIN Medical Simulation Group

Like any new technology, a lot of focus has been placed on ensuring that new users of robotic surgery are adequately trained. Simulation has had a large part to play with this. As the technology has become more mainstream, training requirements have moved from not only training existing surgeons but to ensuring that residents and fellows develop the required skill levels to ensure that they can adapt to the new technologies used in their practice.


Sponsored Advertisement:


Earlier this year we discussed a paper published by the EAU on their curriculum aimed at ensuring that fellows followed a clear curriculum at the end of which they would be deemed to be safe and competent to operate on patients independently. As with many ways of teaching surgery, the procedure is broken into specific steps that the trainee must master before being allowed to carry the whole procedure.

There were no differences in some key clinical outcomes such as positive margins, length of stay, catheter days, readmissions or re-operations when comparing surgeon only to resident –involved cases. There was, however, a difference seen in mean operative time between procedures that were surgeon only cases vs. resident involved (190.4 Min vs. 206.4 Min, P= 0.003)

Read the full article on LinkedIn


Sponsored Advertisement:


New OMNI2 Simulator Control Tablet from Gaumard

gaumard simulator tablet

Check out this latest product release from Gaumard, which has recently also upgraded to a tablet to manage their simulator learning experiences:

OMNI 2 Simulation Made Easy The new OMNI 2 is an easy-to-use, wireless device interface designed to operate Gaumard patient simulators and skills trainers. It offers instructors the essential tools to drive simulation-based training sessions without the complexity of programming. Simply tap and go.

OMNI 2 makes it easier than ever to drive scenarios, monitor performance, and capture participants’ actions for data-rich debriefing sessions. OMNI 2 is simple to operate with touchscreen controls and an intuitive layout that lets you manage physiological changes while remaining focused on the training. Put simply, it’s a frustration-free solution that works to complement your clinical know-how.

Control

  • Wireless communication lets you move freely to better observe the action
  • Over 35 programmable vitals including: HR, ECG, RR, BP, SpO2, EtCO2, and more
  • One-touch vitals controls facilitate changes on-the-fly or trending over time

Monitoring

  • Monitor CPR quality metrics in real time to ensure quality
  • Supports optional virtual patient monitor for training assessment and decision-making skills
  • Monitor ventilation quality and its effectiveness on the patient

Debriefing

  • Timestamped log records provider actions, vital signs changes, and notes to aid debriefing
  • Includes preprogrammed lists of common provider actions for easy tracking
  • Save and share session log for archiving and debriefing

Learn more at the OMNI2 Webpage

Why You & Your Simulation Program Should Avoid Flying United Airlines

why united airlines is the worst(Image via Bloomberg)

When I started HealthySimulation.com 7 years ago my goal was to provide honest unfiltered advice, resources, news and information to healthcare simulation champions around the world. We’ve heard back from a lot of readers that many of the 1,000+ articles on this website have helped their programs successfully start and expand their programs, connecting the right people, equipment, resources, and knowledge to overcome any of the many challenges we all face.

Today will mark the first day I write an article recommending you completely avoid utilizing one specific company when dealing with the logistics of your simulation program, and beyond that, to your professional and personal life. As someone who wants to see your simulation program succeed, I feel it is my duty to inform you that United Airlines should be avoided as your mode of air transportation at all costs. I’m not alone, AirlineQuality.com peer reviews rated United Airlines a 3/10!

I am blessed to be able to travel around the world to host and attend simulation conferences that have taken place in numerous different countries. Of course this has meant I have flown countless hours in economy class with a multitude of carriers — and have seen a dramatic range of services from the industry small and large.

Out of all the carriers I have ever flown, United Airlines has consistently proved to care the least about their passengers. It’s not the poor quality of food served, the minimal legroom (at 6’1″ I literally could not move my legs on my last United flight), and embarrassingly out of date video entertainment systems (which if available at all are flat in the seat in front of you so when the person ahead of you puts their seat back your screen is now irreversibly angled downward). As bad as that sounds, I can exhaust a deep sigh and live with all that without writing an article about it.

What I can’t live with is the fact that during the multiple errors regarding my UA flights around the world through their airlines, their customer service reps consistently demonstrated that they could care less about my needs. Even after waiting 45 minutes in line, I have seen a UA rep play games on their phone until a supervisor showed up. I have been lied to by multiple UA reps about associated change fees. I have seen normal weather conditions be blamed for late service with no overnight support. I have heard UA employees tell me “There’s nothing I can do about what another UA rep told you, it’s not my fault”.

Repeatedly I have experienced United Airline’s out of date service model that blames the customer at every turn, taking any opportunity to make another dollar today over the building of a long-term relationship.

Contrast this experience with a company like Southwest Airlines — that consistently goes above and beyond to provide welcoming, understanding, and flexible customer service that knows the life long relationship is the most important priority for the airline. (Southwest is my absolute favorite airlines by the way and I keep asking them to expand further internationally).

While United Airlines may seem cheaper than other carriers for your flights to simulation events, I urge you to consider the strong potential for an unpleasant experience and unforeseeable fees that will show up if almost anything goes wrong.

Bloomberg recently wrote an article about United Airlines which shared some pretty shocking information:

  • Recently the carrier agreed to pay $2.8 million in fines for tarmac delays and the poor treatment of disabled passengers.
  • On all major performance metrics—delays, cancellations, mishandled bags, and bumped passengers—United has, since 2012, been reliably the worst or near worst among its competitors.
  • In 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, United was responsible for 43 percent of all consumer complaints filed against U.S. airlines.
  • There has been 3 different CEOs in the past year
  • Many of the merged airline’s front-line employees complained that management, having promised significant savings to Wall Street, focused on cutting costs above all else.

Bottom line: If I have ANY other alternative when booking travel for myself and others, I will always take another carrier over United Airlines. Do yourself and your sim program a favor and consider doing the same!

Check out more of the Bloomberg article about the failure that is United Airlines

Tweet us your experiences about United Airlines with @HealthySim & @United


Supported Organization:


WISER Provides Simulation Courses For All Staff Positions

healthcare simulation training program

Did you know that UPMC’s WISER Simulation Center offers several courses and programs to help those in the simulation community improve their skills. Our iSIM course is offered in various worldwide locations and we have had preceptors from all over the world spend time watching and learning at WISER.

Courses include:

iSim: This 3-day internationally renowned program, created in collaborative effort between WISER at the University of Pittsburgh and the Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education at the University of Miami, is designed as an introduction to fundamental skills and abilities for delivering simulation-based healthcare education through a variety of techniques and technologies. The program emphasizes hands-on activities and active participation to maximize simulation-based instruction skill acquisition. Class group sizes are kept small to allow for maximum participation. The primary audience for this course are healthcare educators wishing to improve their skills as instructors in simulation education.

Designing or Enhancing Your Simulation Center: Welcome to “Designing or Enhancing Your Simulation Center”. This one day course is designed to assist those individuals or centers who are interested in designing new or updating existing simulation centers. This is an 8 topic course that will guide the participants, step by step, through the process of identifying their training needs and designing a world class simulation center to meet those needs. Topics include:

  • Introduction to WISER and Course Overview
  • Identifying Your Center’s Training Missions
  • Blueprints to Build Out, Designing Your Center
  • Identifying your Center’s Audio and Video Needs
  • Administrative Considerations
  • Job Descriptions
  • Creating Environments
  • Additional Tips for Success

WISER Fellowship Program

The WISER Fellowship Program is available for individuals who are interested in an in-depth learning experience on all aspects of healthcare simulation. Fellowships typically last from one year to 18 months. The fellowship is a self-directed immersive journey into the world of healthcare simulation. Focuses for this fellowship program often include research, curriculum development, operations, or a combination of topics. All fellows will complete a curriculum (or project) based upon their specific needs that will support their focus.

How to Run a Successful Simulation Center: Participants of this two day program will learn best practices associated with the operations of a simulation center. Key operational, administrative, and technological elements of a successful simulation center will be reviewed. Topics such as creating budgets, staff considerations, daily operations, course development, and simulator programming will be discussed. Interactive exercises will allow participants to practice what they learned during course sessions.

TechSim: A variety of topics will be covered that are designed to educate simulation technicians / operations personnel on the key tasks associated with the daily operations and maintenance of a simulation center. The content topics were mapped to the SSH CHSOS Examination Blueprint. Topics include:

  • Simulation Center Technology
  • Scenario Creation
  • Repair and Maintenance Considerations
  • Running Sim Sessions and much more.

Visit the WISER Courses page to learn more!

The Language of Sales – How to Increase Your Simulation Budget

how to start using healthcare simulation

This summer I had two fantastic engagements that focused on helping simulation champions increase their program, by gaining additional financial support through considering the language of sales when dealing with administrators.

First was at the Global Network for Simulation in Healthcare meeting in Oxford last month which continued the work started by previous participants to identify and create a tool set for helping simulation champions convey the opportunities of simulation to administrators. Look out for industry-changing content from this group in the next twenty-four months.

The second was the amazing SimGHOSTS USA keynote address by Jump Trading Simulation Center’s EMS SimulationIQ keynote address by their CMO Dr. John Vozenilek, who demonstrated how their simulation program was seen as a cost-reduction center for the OSF Healthcare hospital. (That keynote address will be uploaded soon any freely available on SimGHOSTS.org)

While this conversation is not new to the world of healthcare simulation, in fact we covered it extensively in 2012 during the HealthySimAdmin event which you can watch here, the conversation has definitely evolved to become a primary concern of simulation program directors and industry partners around the world.

To grow your simulation program, the concept is simple:

To increase your simulation program you will need increased financial and institutional resources, and to do that, you need to gain the support of the highest level administrators possible from your organization. So how do you successful start and maintain that conversation with institutional leadership so they become as impassioned about simulation as you are? As clinicians, researchers, educators, administrators, and technology specialists, we may not have the learned the tools necessary to convey this message in a way that can be heard by the other side.

As a documentary film-maker I learned at an early age that I need to craft my message in a way that can be understood by the audience. If they cannot understand parts of my message, or they are missing context, or don’t have a chance to build the right frame of mind — then my efforts would not translate into the understanding the audience was willing to consume. When it comes to marketing, the first thing I read was that “no one cares about your problems, they only care about their own”.

In that reality, we need to start our campaign to increase simulation not from our perspective, but from the perspective of the highest level administrators we will need to participate in-order to move the program forward in a big way. The question then becomes: What are their priorities, their needs, and most importantly their problems? Usually, the priorities in healthcare education are for maximum learner pass rates and in professional healthcare for increased quality of care with minimal costs. BOTH groups usually share the same primary problem: finances.

With this knowledge we can begin to speak to organizational leadership within the right frame to capture their attention, provide solutions, and create big wins.

Well as healthcare simulation champions we are comfortable with learning a new language, of being early-adopters and challenging the status quo with innovative practices, equipment and programs. We too must also challenge ourselves to also learn the “language of sales” to help those around us see what we see: that simulation improves efficiency and quality, while ultimately reducing costs.

Each week over the next month I will share a book, website, movie, or other resource that can you speak this “language of sales” in an effort to increase your opportunity to expand your simulation program. Topics will include why and how to craft “an elevator pitch”, how to identify key stakeholders and their priorities, sales messaging, and relationship building.

Don’t miss must-read articles by
Subscribing to our free monthly email newsletter!

The Must-Own Healthcare Simulation Library *Updated for 2016

medical simulation books

Sim Champs! Have you seen the latest list of awesome healthcare simulation books? These must-own volumes will help you develop, maintain, expand your simulation program. Whether it’s clinical faculty debriefing techniques, administrative tips, or technical prep for the CHSOS — everything below will have your team ready for any simulation challenge:

Latest Additions:



Here’s the older collection of medical simulation books that are still must-reads:

______________________

Subscribe to our free email newsletter for announcements about new books when they come out!

INACSL’s Latest Simulation in Nursing Journal Highlights Standardized Patients

nursing simulation journal

Suzie Kardong-Edgren, Director of the RISE Center at Robert Morris University, Drexel Faculty member, and INACSL Simulation in Nursing Journal editor recently shared “Standardized Patients have been a part of health professional education for over 50 years now. As an educational field that continues to grow in scholarship and practice, the editors of Clinical Simulation in Nursing feel the time is right to dedicate a special issue to examining ongoing contributions, share best practices and honour debates within the live simulation field relevant to its practitioners and health professional educators more broadly.”

INACL invites health professionals who are engaging standardized patients (SPs) in simulation education to submit manuscripts for a special issue to be published in July 2017.

Nancy McNaughton, M.Ed., Ph.D., Associate Director, Standardized Patient Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto and Mindi Anderson, PhD, ARNP, CPNP-PC, CNE, CHSE-A, ANEF, University of Central Florida College of Nursing will serve as the guest editors for this special issue.

When submitting manuscripts for this special issue, please select “special issue” when the choices appear.

Clinical Simulation in Nursing is the flagship journal of the International Association of Clinical Simulation and Learning. The journal provides a forum for research, innovation, review, and debate in simulation. The journal is dedicated to the advancement of simulation as an educational strategy to improve patient care. A double blind peer-review process is used for all submissions.

Manuscripts for consideration should be submitted to Clinical Simulation in Nursing (www.nursingsimulation.org) by 15 February, 2017.

CREST Provides Cultural Respect Simulation Training

CREST cultural training

The Universtiy of Melbourne and Victoria University have partnered to provide Cultural Respect Encompassing Simulation Training, or CREST for short. If this interests you then HURRY — The next program starts NEXT week!!

Cultural Respect Encompassing Simulation Training (CREST) is a collaborative program between the University of Melbourne (UoM) and Victoria University (VU). It was funded over the last 4 years (2012-2015) by Health Workforce Australia and the Department of Health and Human Services. UoM and VU now run it as a self-funded project.

CREST comprises five modules designed to deliver training relating to cultural sensitivity in communication to health professional practitioners and students using simulation pedagogy. The five CREST modules are:

1. Introduction to cultural diversity: This module explores the interaction between culture and health, and the influence culture has on the identity and health beliefs of both patients and health care providers.

2. Negotiating between different health beliefs: This module explores how culture, religion and life experiences influence an individual’s health belief system, understanding of health and disease causation, and health seeking behaviours. It also facilitates the development of effective and culturally sensitive communication and negotiation skills.

3. Effective communication when English proficiency is low: This module explains the principles of effective communication with linguistically diverse patients and identifies strategies for working effectively with an interpreter. Participants will practice communicating with clients with low English proficiency and working with an interpreter.

4. Communicating culturally sensitive issues: This module explores some of the culturally sensitive factors that may affect the identity and health of culturally diverse patients, including those that contribute to health inequalities. Participants will gain an understanding of how some cultural and religious beliefs strongly shape relationships and daily life practices, and potentially affect engagement with healthcare systems.

5. Communication and Indigenous healthcare: This module explores the diversity and uniqueness of the Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultures, and highlights the importance of demonstrating cultural respect in enhancing a patients desire and ability to seek health care.

Learn more on the CREST webpage today!

 

Transsphenoidal Tumor Resection Surgery Simulator from Medprin

tumor surgery simulator

Medprin Biotech GmbH is a high-tech enterprise specializing in R & D and manufacturing of human tissue regenerative implantable medical devices. Recently they provided this video series on a new Transsphenoidal Tumor Resection Surgery Simulator. The solid, highly realistic training model overcomes the disadvantage of the traditional surgical training, saves training cost and time, lowers surgical risk of the new surgeons, improves the quality of the medical teaching and training.

About Medprin

MEDPRIN BIOTECH is a high-tech enterprise co-founded by outstanding biomedicine scientists in September 2008, specialized in R & D, production and sales of regenerative medicine materials and regenerative implantable medical devices. MEDPRIN aims to become global leader in the field of implantable medical devices, relying on amazing capacity to provide excellent products for the patients worldwide based on biological 3D printing technology and nano-bionics technology, so MEDPRIN will accurately and efficiently manufacture more new implantable medical devices for human tissue recovery, replacement and regeneration, in accordance with the enterprise cultures featured in “innovation, cooperation and mutual love” and the quality policy to play a leading role in science & technology capacity and quality and constantly keep sound integrity to save more lives.

More on the Medprin website!

Top 9 Most Read Healthcare Simulation Articles from Summer 2016

top 9 medical simulation articles 2016

Sim Champs do you subscribe to our free monthly healthcare simulation email newsletter? If so you may have seen these awesome articles which are the Top 9 most read medical simulation from Summer 2016! We’re highlighting the ones that have read, shared, and clicked the most so far — as we are sure they will bring increased adoption and utilization of simulation to your healthcare education program!

  1. University of San Francisco Now Offering Master of Science in Healthcare Simulation Online 
  2. Simulation in Healthcare Journal — June 2016 Article List 
  3. SimGHOSTS USA 2016 Opens at Jump Trading Simulation Center Sponsored by SimulationIQ 
  4. Supporting Transitions in Medical Career Pathways: the Role of Simulation-Based Education 
  5. Do Checklists Change Human Behaviors? Thoughts from Medical Lawyer Dr. Argy 
  6. Laerdal Asks Simulation Experts “Is Simulation Just About the Simulator?” and More… 
  7. TEDx Talk: Simulation Necessary To Prepare for Birthing Emergencies 
  8. Media Covers May BMJ Article: “Medical Error 3rd Leading Cause of Death in U.S.” – Call for New Hashtag #SimToZero! 
  9. Delta College Performs 6 Hour Trauma Simulation Scenario with Local Authorities

Bonus Link:

Here is the Top 10 Most Read Healthcare Simulation Articles
from HealthySimulation.com ever!