Featured Healthcare Simulation Job Listing: Director of Operations for Duke Human Simulation & Patient Safety Center

healthcare sim job

Duke University has a new featured job posting in our Medical Simulation Jobs page!

Job Title: Director of Operations,
Institution: Duke Human Simulation and Patient Safety Center
Location: Durham, North Carolina


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Job Description / Goals: The Duke Human Simulation and Patient Safety Center (HSPSC) Director of Operation’s (DoO) primary responsibility is to maximize the center’s performance by managing daily operations and implementing organizational strategies to improve efficiency, quality, and teamwork. The DoO will also serve as the operational, fiscal, human resources, and strategic advisor to the Director. In the case the Director is unavailable, the DoO will serve as his representative in matters related to education, research and administration.

  • Provide leadership and management for all daily activities in the HSPSC
    • Manage all employees in the HSPSC
    • Define specific roles and responsibilities for all center employees
  • Develop and Implement organizational and programmatic strategies for the HSPSC, in collaboration with Dr. Taekman, and formally assess effectiveness of all strategies
    • Analyze current organizational status, identify needs, and develop organizational improvement plans
    • Common communication platform with dashboard, calendar, and file storage
    • Redistribute workload as appropriate
    • Identify and acquire additional resources as needed
    • Create open channel for feedback and ideas
    • Foster an open and supportive workplace culture
    • Meet with each member of HPSPC staff to determine needs and gather ideas
  • Gain familiarization and provide assistance with program management, clinical, simulation, and resource for ongoing and future projects
    • Meet with each team member to discuss ongoing projects
    • Review relevant material on all projects
    • Provide assistance as needed to all team members
  • Provide fiscal, human resources, operational, and strategic guidance to the director
    • Meet with Dr. Taekman on a regular basis to keep him apprised of all center operations issues
    • Develop and implement operational infra-structure for new facility
    • Work with Dr. Taekman to create/establish the HSPSC mission and vision
    • Anticipate renewal deadlines for required HSPSC lab certification standards (e.g., CME accreditation)
    • Optimize systems in new facility
    • Market goals and achievements in all missions (education, research, safety)
  • Support missions of Duke Health
    • Provide strategic guidance for aligning activities with organizational vision
    • Gather and analyze market and operational data
    • Assist with crafting reports and presentations to Duke Leadership
  • Establish collaborative relationships within and outside of Duke
    • Meet with and establish working relationships with simulation and medical community both within and outside of Duke
    • Identify opportunities to collaborate with Duke Simulation community (e.g., Duke Surgical Education and Activities (SEAL) laboratory)
  • Provide operational support/backup for all missions of the HSPSC

Interested applicants should e-mail their resume, cover letter and salary requirements to Ilene Farkas


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University of San Francisco Launches Online Healthcare Simulation Certificate Program

certificate in healthcare simulation

The University of San Francisco Healthcare Simulation Certificate Program for Professional Development online program is now taking applications for the Fall August 2017 start date! Click the link below to learn more and register for the program!

With Simulation emerging as a novel approach to educating and training healthcare professionals, the demand for simulation professionals has skyrocketed. The University of San Francisco is proud to be leading this change by announcing our new online Certificate in Healthcare simulation program. This unique 3 semester (one year) certificate is designed for both clinicians and non-clinicians requiring no previous experience. “As a non clinician with a history in theatre and business, this gave me a great overall picture of healthcare simulation and how I can bring my specialty to the industry.” Katie Francis, Alumni and Simulation Operations Manager The certificate prepares you for opportunities in healthcare simulation, teaching, management and operations.

Healthcare Sim Cert Program Features

  • Online format – Students attend courses online and complete assignments when they choose, adhering to coursework deadlines.
  • Designed to complete in one (1) year or three (3) semesters.
  • Students are required to attend a teaching & instruction Practicum held in a Simulation Lab (in-person or virtual).

The Sim Certificate Will Prepare You To:

  • Implement current simulation organizational standards in curriculum design and teaching
  • Integrate educational principles into simulation practice
  • Distinguish effective, psychomotor and cognitive learning strategies in simulation education
  • Appraise evaluation tools for utility in simulation education
  • Create innovative education designs for interprofessional practice
  • Analyze sustainable business plans for the operation of a simulation lab or program

Distinguished Faculty

  • The Director of the program, KT Waxman, DNP, RN, CNL, CENP, CHSE, FAAN is Director of the California Simulation Alliance and is an internationally known speaker and author on the topic of healthcare simulation.
  • Cynthia Shum DNP (c), MEd, RN, CHSE–A is the Healthcare Simulation Educator at the Veteran’s Hospital in Palo Alto, CA. Cynthia has received a Certificate of Outstanding Contribution in reviewing the “Clinical Simulation in Nursing” journal in 2015. In 2012 she was awarded the Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator certificate by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare.

Learn how you can be a part of this exciting program at the USF Healthcare Simulation Certificate Page!

Featured Job Listing: Western Region Sales Representative

engeniumlogo4

Another featured medical simulation job posting from Engenium:

Western Region Sales representative reports to the Director of Sales and is responsible for managing sales activities throughout every stage of the sales cycle, from lead generation through to close. Covering the Western region, you will be responsible for selling software and hardware solutions used to improve training and patient outcomes in Hospital, Nursing Schools and colleges.

Responsibilities include:

  • Responsible for the sales of Software and hardware solutions for simulation and clinical environments within the Northeast region.
  • Responsible for building strong relationships within the Northeast region within hospitals, Nursing School/colleges and health system networks.
  • Consult and make recommendations to prospects and clients with respect to solutions the company offers.
  • Clearly articulate technology and product positioning to clinical and medical education.
  • Deliver web-based and onsite presentations to audiences of varying sizes and professions
  • Demonstrate the ability to build relationships with Medical Education and Patient Safety Key stakeholders.
  • Maximize all opportunities in the process of closing a sale, resulting in the taking of market share from competitors.
  • Exhibit at industry conferences and special events.
  • Maintain accurate records of all sales and prospecting activities including sales calls, presentations, closed sales, and follow-up activities through weekly reports and the use of a CRM tool.

What we are looking for:

  • A minimum of 2-4 years professional experience
  • Proven ability to achieve sales quotas
  • Experience with web-based productivity tools
  • Willingness to travel a minimum of 30% and work in a fast-paced environment.
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills
  • Ability to work independently and in a team environment
  • B.A./B.S. in Business, Computer Science, Healthcare Management, or related degree strongly preferred
  • Experience using Salesforce is a plus
  • Software & Simulation experience is highly desired
  • Existing contacts within the Medical Education and Patient Safety industries is strongly preferred

Apply here for the position!


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Watch: Gardaí Simulate Terror Attack at Dublin’s Docklands

Watch: Gardaí test response to terror attack in simulation at Dublin's Docklands

The Irish-based Gardai engaged with a counter-terrorism exercise in Dublin recently to test their response in the event of a mass casualty terrorist attack. The simulation, codenamed ’Sciath’, involved a number of actors at the Docklands railway station in Dublin’s north inner city and the garda units involved today had not been told ahead of time what would be involved.

Does your simulation program work with local Civil Service Groups to provide simulated training opportunities? The promotional opportunities to develop new business opportunities and showcase your simulation program are clearly evident!

As part of the simulation, the men inside acted out assaulting a number of people inside the station. Armed officers used stun grenades and blank rounds, shooting one of the suspects and securing the scene. “Today has demonstrated the professionalism and the capability that we have,” Garda Commissioner Nóirín O’Sullivan told reporters after the training exercise was finished. “Incidents like this can happen. We have to make sure that we are ready to respond to those incidents. In the last few days we have given instructions to all of our members and I think we wanted to see how those instructions would work,” she said.

The Commissioner said simulations such as today’s operation are prioritised in high density areas like Dublin city, but she said further exercises will take place in other parts of the country to test response times outside the capital.

Mixed and Augmented Reality Can Facilitate Seamless Medical Communication

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MedicalResearch.com recently interviewed Birmingham City University Associate Professor Dr. Ian Williams PhD about the work of the DMT lab on mixed and augmented reality for healthcare simulated training. Make no mistake, VR and AR are the future of healthcare simulated training:

Dr. Williams: Our work at the DMT Lab (dmtlab.bcu.ac.uk) focuses on developing a novel Mixed Reality (MR) medical presentation platform which allows practitioners to interact with patient data and virtual anatomical models in real time. The system enables the presentation of medical data, models and procedures to patients with the aim of educating them on pending procedures or the effects of lifestyle choices (for example the effects of smoking or excessive alcohol consumption).

The system employs an exocentric mixed reality environment which can be deployed in any room. It integrates a medical practitioner in real time with multimodal patient data and the corresponding result is a real time co-located visualisation of both the practitioner and the data, which they can interact with in real time.  We implement a natural interaction method into the system which improves a user’s level of direct interaction with the virtual models and provides a more realistic control of the data.

The system can also be used in a fun educational setting where patients, students, children or any naive user, can learn about medical anatomical information via a real-time interactive mixed reality “body scanner”. This fun system overlays the MR information onto their own body in real-time and shows them scaled and interactive virtual organs, anatomy and corresponding medical information. We are aiming for this system to be used not only in patient education but also in engaging and informing people on lifestyle choices.

MedicalResearch.com: What types of medical or surgical problems do you envision can be enhanced with the use of free hand gestures to manipulate patient data?

Dr. Williams: Mixed reality has enormous potential within the medical field, with healthcare being profoundly affected by some recent developments. Mixed reality technology can also provide the platform for facilitating a seamless doctor-patient communications in real time. The system we are developing can provide a real time augmented view of the patient’s data which can be overlaid onto the patient, or interacted with via freehand interaction without the use of complex wearable devices.

Many current mixed reality systems rely on bespoke sensors and cumbersome wearable devices (for example haptic gloves) whereas we work in freehand interaction without the need for a medical practitioner or patient to wear any complex wearable device. This interaction method enables a more natural virtual interface and via the use of naturally inspired physical interaction models (for example common real grasping types) we bridge the gap between users and technology. This form of natural interaction can also enable an interaction which can be perceived as more realistic to the observer.


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Medical Group Readies Complaint Over Use of Live Pigs for Training Instead of Simulators

live animal training instead of simulators for healthcare

Last week the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine announced they will file a federal complaint against the University of Missouri School of Medicine, questioning the legality of the school’s use of live animals for emergency medicine residency training — as reported by the Columbia Tribune.

Consider that if enough healthcare groups complained about the abuse of animals for medical training, that simulators would grow in adoption and utilization, as this article clearly points out! Does your healthcare program have an animal rights group? Perhaps as a simulation center representative you should connect with them to explore collaborative options of mutually beneficial support!

In the complaint, which the committee emailed to the Tribune on Friday, the national not-for-profit organization of 12,000 physicians asserts that the training program does not meet the requirements of the Animal Welfare Act of 1966. Emergency residents practice several medical procedures on live pigs, and “this animal use is at odds with the current standards of practice in emergency medicine training,” the committee said in the complaint.

The committee conducted a survey of 168 emergency medicine programs nationwide and found that 150 of them, or 89 percent, did not use animals to train residents. Four of those 150 programs are in Missouri, including the University of Missouri-Kansas City, which is part of the UM System along with the Columbia campus. In the complaint, the committee said these 150 programs use only human-based simulation to practice the procedures that MU’s residents practice on pigs. 

Because the MU School of Medicine uses live animals despite the existence of alternative methods and has not provided “objective evidence to support” doing so, the school is breaking the law, the organization said in the complaint. However, Foundation for Biomedical Research President Matthew Bailey said in an email that nationwide, doctors do not have a general consensus that simulation can replace the use of animals in physician training.

“While simulators have become increasingly advanced in recent years, and make good adjuncts to training, many doctors do not agree that they provide an adequate level of training before operating on live people,” Bailey said. “They simply aren’t a full replacement in every case, yet.”

Human-based simulators “are not yet capable of replicating the human condition” in the case of some injuries, Bailey said. He gave the example of traumatic injuries that members of the military might suffer in combat. The Association of American Medical Colleges on its website says that the role of live animals in research is “irreplaceable” and that animals are “vital in the medical education continuum.”

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine attributes its information about MU’s emergency medicine training program from a protocol document the committee obtained. According to the document, trainees cut into and open the throats and chests of the live pigs in order to insert needles and tubes and repair an injury to the pericardium, a sac surrounding the heart. The trainees continue the procedures even if the pig dies in the process, but if it survives, they kill it before they perform the final procedure.

The committee will send the complaint to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Animal Care Unit, which is the division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture responsible for enforcing the Animal Welfare Act. The complaint asks APHIS to investigate MU’s medical school and enforce penalties for what the committee sees as breaches of federal law.

BuzzFeed Informs Public: Virtual Reality Is Medical Simulation Training’s Next Frontier

Virtual Reality Is Medical Training's Next Frontier

BuzzFeed recently reported on the new advances in VR technologies currently being utilized for medical training, a sign that our advanced methodologies are contiuning to interest mainstream media!

“There’s a baby boy on a stretcher in a children’s hospital emergency room. His mother is standing nearby, begging the doctors to do something, as her baby lies there. He is drooling and shaking; his diaper is soaked; he is making a disturbing snoring noise. An EMT comes in and says, “Doctor, this is a one-year-old male found by the mother at home, having a seizure. The seizure’s been lasting about seven minutes. Blood glucose on scene was 90.” The EMT leaves.

 

According to Dr. Joshua Sherman of CHLA and the USC Keck School of Medicine, VR helps solve several problems for medical training programs: expense, accessibility, and verisimilitude. (Sherman also helped develop the training.) Hands-on training for medical students and residents is time-consuming and expensive — mannequins run upwards of $50,000, plus maintenance and tech support — and also requires a room full of actual people to play the doctors and nurses. The other type of training currently used is screen-based training, but that doesn’t closely mimic a real-life situation. VR manages to replicate the atmosphere of an emergency room situation while also being accessible — a trainee can easily do it on his or her own time. Besides the simulated nature of the experience, the main drawbacks right now are lack of voice control and inability to have more than one person in the experience at the same time. There’s also currently only two training modules, so the applications are limited.

Sherman’s first VR experience was the Oculus Dreamdeck — which puts users at the top of a very tall building. Sherman, who is afraid of heights, felt his heart rate go up and his palms get sweaty. “I knew it was not real but I couldn’t get myself to jump,” he said. “When I felt that physiologic response and how similar it was to the real world, I immediately thought, why can’t we use this to simulate the response on resuscitations? We can train people who we can’t train in real life, up to an extent, so then when they face it in real life, it still will be very stressful but they will be able to select the correct items and protocols under pressure.”

I’m not a doctor, nor am I training to be one, but when I tried the simulation (or as it’s officially called, the “VR Pediatric Resuscitation Module 1: Status Epilepticus”), I found myself getting anxious about choosing the right protocol for this fake baby. Though I was guided through it by Clay Park VR founder and former Oculus developer relations specialist Shauna Heller, who produced the project, it was still nerve-racking to be inside this emergency room, responsible for saving the life of an infant.

Sherman said that’s entirely the point. “We compared the physiology of stress in real-life emergency situations to that of people going through VR — their heart rate, breathing rate, and salivary cortisol, which is a stress hormone. The preliminary data shows that the heart rates definitely correlate between the real world and VR world.”


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EMSWorld Interviews Moulage Concepts Founder Bobbie Merica About Simulation Realism Through Makeup

EMSWorld recently interviewed Moulage expert Bobbie Merica of MoulageConcepts.com to learn how moulage makeup can improve the educational outcomes of simulation by increasing the realism for learners. Here are a couple of excerpts from the EMSWorld article entitled The Importance of Accuracy in Moulage Trainingby Valeria Amato:

What advice would you give people who are looking to implement more realistic and effective moulage into training regimens?

It’s like anything else: You need to plan and prepare. When you develop your case scenarios, decide what the takeaway is going to be. Is it triage-specific? If so, then your wounds should accurately represent wounds related to triage. A lot of the time, people will throw in the moulage piece at the end without giving it any thought. They won’t collectively decide what the full-thickness burn is going to look like, what the pediatric patient will look like and how they’re going to present it. Locate an accurate picture on the Internet of an actual case. Practice creating moulage so that everyone in your training knows what these wounds will look like.

Mostly it’s about the planning. You’d never run your training scenarios without a great deal of planning. When you’re building those scenarios, start building in those moulage components. Understand what story you want to tell. Understand what the training outcome is. Is intubation with a full-thickness burn the outcome, or is it identifying the smoke inhalation? If the training outcome is smoke inhalation, then you don’t need a full-thickness burn. It’s not difficult to clarify that a full-thickness burn in the upper airway in the chest and neck has smoke inhalation. If you really want to know if someone has smoke inhalation, bring it back and test it in multiple areas. Create that eye-reddening, some tears coming down, the reddening in the back of the throat. That little bit of hoarseness. Break it out into multiple training avenues, unless intubating the patient with a full-thickness burn is the skill set.

That makes sense, especially going back to what you said about using moulage in less of a theatrical capacity and for mass-casualty incidents.

If it’s a mass-casualty incident, you’re going to have some people who look like those first-line-of-response people, but often a lot of those people look the same. Certainly you should assess the woman screaming and covered in blood, but you might also want to look at that person quietly dying right next to her. It’s about creating all those aspects and using this as a tool to define where those strengths are and, more important, where those weaknesses are so you know how to align future training dollars.

I think every person, every entity and every training site should have access to this level of training. Moulage doesn’t have to be expensive and time-consuming. You can have amazing moulage that tells the whole story, allowing you to spend the next six weeks accurately training your participants to meet outcomes, that will cost you pennies.

Do you have a copy of Bobbie’s Best Selling Moulage Recipe Book? Check out our review here!

Featured Job Listing: Simulation Lab Director for Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

vanderbilt

Today HealthySim is featuring a new position from our medical simulation jobs page from the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing and Simulation, who are seeking a Simulation Lab Director!

Position: Simulation Lab Director
Institution: Vanderbilt University
Location: Nashville, Tennessee

From Vanderbilt University SON:

Come join our expanding simulation program at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing as we prepare to open our new simulation lab in August 2018. We are seeking an experienced Master’s prepared nurse (doctorate preferred) to join our simulation team consisting of a simulation researcher, simulation support staff, and informatics personnel. The Skills and Simulation Lab Director will provide leadership and support in simulation-based learning for both students and faculty consistent with national professional standards, including collaboration in design, implementation, evaluation and integration of simulation activities across academic programs, and operational oversight for lab activities. The ideal candidate for this full-time, non-tenure faculty position will have simulation, teaching and administrative experience. Minority candidates are especially encouraged to apply. All faculty positions are 12-month appointments and benefit packages are exceptional. Rank commensurate with experience. Vanderbilt University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer. The Final candidate for this position must successfully complete a background check.

Applicants should initially submit a cover letter and resume or curriculum vitae to: Vanderbilt University School of Nursing at vusnfacultyrecruitment@vanderbilt.edu

 

 

‘The Little Couple’ Star Dr. Jen Arnold Accepts New Position as Medical Director of FL Sim Center

‘The Little Couple' star Jen Arnold making a career move from TX back to her hometown in FL

Fox23 recently reported about Healthcare Simulation’s most famous celebrity, Dr. Jen Arnold, who is moving back to Florida to help direct the John Hopkins All Chidren’s Hospital Sim Center! Dr. Arnold’s powerful story has helped to share healthcare simulation with the world, probably more than any other media persona!

Dr. Jen Arnold and Bill Klein of ‘The Little Couple’ appeared on ‘Good Morning America’ in 2014. After nine years in Houston, the couple is moving back to the St. Petersburg, Florida area, where Arnold grew up. Fred Lee/Getty Images Dr. Jen Arnold of “ The Little Couple ” fame is moving back home to Florida with her husband, Bill Klein, and two children. The reality TV star accepted a position at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg as medical director of the hospital’s expanding Simulation Center.

Coincidentally, Dr. Arnold was cared for as an infant at the very same hospital and married Klein at St. Petersburg’s St. Mary Our Lady of Grace Church, which is located very close to her new hospital. The family, along with their two children, Will, 6, and Zoey, 5, have already made the move from Houston to Florida.

Arnold shared a family photo on Instagram, showing her with her kids over the weekend, writing, “I don’t want summer to end! This has been a summer of wonderful Florida memories!” Arnold previously worked for nine years as the medical director of simulation at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston, but was excited about the new opportunity. “I’m thrilled to return home to Florida,” she said in a statement that the hospital released. “The opportunity at Johns Hopkins All Children’s is a perfect fit personally for me, my husband and two kids and professionally with the growing education and research resources at the hospital.”